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Masters Degrees (20Th Century)

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This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Read more

This Masters is concerned with outlining and critically evaluating the concept of the ‘avant-garde’ both theoretically and in terms of its applicability to representative areas of 20th-century art. Dealing with art from the early twentieth century to the present, you will investigate concepts such as historical avant-garde, neo-avant-garde, and post-avant-garde, paying close attention to the theorists who have elaborated these ideas.

Why this programme

  • Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. You are granted privileged access to the extensive collections in our own Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery.
  • You have the opportunity to take part in a project-based work placement, where you can explore a possible future career while meeting professional practitioners and developing your skills and experience.
  • If you want to learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge of 20th-century Avant-Gardes, this programme is for you.
  • Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics.

Programme structure

Closely focused on the visual and historical specificities of the subject, the core teaching will have you examining the politically oppositional and ‘transgressive’ impulses of the avant-garde.

You will interpret ‘transgression’ in the widest sense and in relation to a range of diverse historical contexts, including: the anti-art concerns of Dada; the political tensions arising from conflicts between nationalist and internationalist currents in European art of the early 20th century and the Nietzschian/Bataillean testing of the boundaries of conventional moral positions, particularly regarding sexual identity and the body.

The optional courses available are closely geared to the research interests of our staff. Their content will draw upon current exhibitions and debates. 

You will take five core courses and one optional course. This is followed by a period of self-study towards a dissertation 15,000 words in length (including footnotes but excluding bibliography) and will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and the programme convenor.

Core courses

  • Research methods in practice
  • Theories of the Avant Garde
  • Readings in Duchamp: anti-art, blasphemy, sexuality
  • Art, embodiment, transgression
  • Dada in Switzerland and Germany.

Optional courses

You may choose from the following options in the College of Arts

  • a Humanities Advanced Technology and Information Institute (HATII) course: 2D Digitisation (Theory and Practice)
  • a course from the MLitt Modernities: Modernism, Modernity & Post-Modernity run by English Literature 
  • a course from elsewhere in the College of Arts, subject to the approval of the programme convenor.

Or from courses run by History of Art

  • Art in the making: modern and Avant-Garde techniques
  • Independent study 
  • Work placement.

Study trip

Students on this programme are invited to take part in an optional study trip of approximately one week, which is funded by the student. Previous destinations include Berlin and Dublin.

Career prospects

Career opportunities include positions in curation, digitisation and research within museums and other cultural and heritage institutions. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move onto PhD studies and an academic career.



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Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. Read more
Our history programme offers research opportunities in areas as diverse as medicine, death, historical demography, gender, women's history and urban culture. As an MPhil or PhD student you will enjoy a research environment in which ambitious and original ideas can flourish.

Many of the research opportunities in history are interdisciplinary and are available for most periods of history and in most geographical regions.

You can find out more about MPhil and PhD supervision areas from the School of History, Classics and Archaeology. There are opportunities for joint supervision with Latin American researchers in the School of Modern Languages.

Supervision is normally available in the following subject areas:

Classical, medieval and early modern medicine

Topics include:
-Reception(s) of Hippocratic medicine and Hippocratic Oath
-History of medical ethics
-History and iconography of melancholy and psychopathology
-Medical history/historiography as an academic discipline
-Genres of medical writing
-Interface between medicine and literature, Thomas Mann and medicine
-Medicine and philosophy; medicine and law

The supervisor in this area is Dr T Rütten.

Death and burial

The history of poverty and poor relief in pre-industrial England (Professor J Boulton).

Gender, women's history and the history of sexuality

Britain (Dr H Berry); the modern Atlantic world (Dr D Paton); Greece (Dr V Hionidou).

Historical demography

The history of nutrition, famine and mortality; the history of fertility, birth control and contraception (Dr V Hionidou).

History of ideas

Revolutionary ideology in 18th and 19th century Britain and France (Dr R Hammersley); European historiography (Dr L Racaut).

History of psychiatry

Mental health and the 'asylum'; forensic psychiatry, criminal lunacy and crime; the history of the body; early modern social and cultural history of health; history of hospitals; history of sexuality; domestic/household medicine; travel and medicine (Dr J Andrews).

Early medieval Britain and Europe (Dr S Ashley, Ms A Redgate).

National identity, inter-ethnic relations and border issues

Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); North America (Dr B Houston); Russia and Ukraine (Professor D Saunders); Mexico and Cuba (Dr K Brewster); the Caribbean (Dr D Paton); Spain (Dr A Quiroga); Ireland (Dr S Ashley, Dr F Campbell); the Irish in Britain (Dr J Allen).

Politics, international relations and the impact of war

Modern British politics (Dr J Allen, Dr M Farr, Dr F Campbell); European fascism and the Nazi new order (Professor T Kirk); 20th century France (Dr M Perry); 20th century Italy (Dr C Baldoli); transwar Japan (Dr M Dusinberre); American Civil War and the United States in the 19th century (Professor S M Grant); the United States in the 20th century (Dr B Houston).

Urban history and urban culture

History of the press in early modern France (Dr L Racaut); 19th century Newcastle and the North East (Dr J Allen); 18th century urban cultures in Britain (Dr H Berry); 17th century London (Professor J Boulton); urban culture in the Habsburg Empire (Professor T Kirk).

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How has the decline of European empires in the extra-European world shaped the 20th century – and beyond?. The Master’s degree in The Making of the Modern World is an innovative programme which addresses the legacies of decolonisation on contemporary nation and state-building around the world. Read more
How has the decline of European empires in the extra-European world shaped the 20th century – and beyond?

The Master’s degree in The Making of the Modern World is an innovative programme which addresses the legacies of decolonisation on contemporary nation and state-building around the world. Students are introduced to debates about decolonisation and its relationship with modernity, addressing the question of how the end of empire has shaped the modern world.

This MA examines the nature of decolonisation in comparative perspective, looking at the British, French, Dutch, Spanish, Portuguese, German and Belgian empires, rather than limiting the study of empire to a few case studies or to a single colonial power. The MA examines the differences in colonial governance and decolonisation processes, and how this has impacted the development of successor colonial states and the processes of decolonisation, nation-building, and the strengthening of the state which these states experienced.

Upon graduating, students will receive a degree awarded by the University of London.

Students will:

Learn about and analyse the political, developmental, institutional and social legacies of the decolonisation process;
Understand the connectivity between domestic politics and society and international diplomacy and policymaking;
Develop skills in understanding and analysing archival sources and undertaking archival and oral research;
Understand the ways in which the decline of the European empires in the extra-European world has shaped the 20th century.
This advanced degree provides an excellent foundation for students who wish to expand their knowledge of international history, politics and society prior to working for international organisations, the media, or in other professional capacities. It also provides the base for those wishing to do further research in African, Asian or European studies.

In addition to the knowledge gained over the course of the MA, the skills students develop - including the ability to analyse material in detail, process quantitative and qualitative data to reach informed conclusions, critique existing knowledge and conduct independent research - will be relevant to a wide variety of careers and will broaden students' appeal to a range of employers.

Structure

In order to pass the MA, students need to have achieved a total of 90 European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System (ECTS) credits. ECTS credits are recognised across the European Union. The degree comprises four compulsory modules (including the dissertation), and three optional modules.

Required (core) modules (Autumn Term):

Historical Research Skills (with the Institute of Historical Research) [10 ECTS]
European Decolonisation in the 20th Century [10 ECTS]
Ethnicity, Nationalism, Liberation and Identity: the view from the Extra-European world [10 ECTS]
Optional modules* (Spring Term):

Diplomacy and Decolonisation [10 credits]
Geopolitics and Decolonisation [10 credits]
Policing, Intelligence and Counter-Insurgency [10 credits]
Decolonisation, Nation-State Building and Development [10 credits]
*All modules are subject to availability.

Dissertation [30 ECTS]

Students will complete a 15,000-word research-based dissertation on a chosen topic within human rights which is of special interest to them. This topic will be chosen in consultation with your dissertation supervisor, who will provide support.

Assessment

The MA is assessed primarily through essays, although class participation also contributes towards assessment. Additional formative assessments include class presentations.

Mode of study

Study options: full-time over one year, or part time over 24 months.

Students undertaking the MA on a part-time basis will take two required modules in Autumn Term of their first year, and up to two optional modules in the Spring Term. They will take one required module in the Autumn Term of their second year, and one or two optional modules in the Spring Term.

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Why this course?. The MSc in Health History explores the last two-and-a-half centuries to seek the origins and impacts of our modern health experiences and expectations, together with the reasons they've changed so rapidly. Read more

Why this course?

The MSc in Health History explores the last two-and-a-half centuries to seek the origins and impacts of our modern health experiences and expectations, together with the reasons they've changed so rapidly. It examines a variety of issues such as the:

  • development of psychiatry since its birth in the 19th century
  • rise of regulation for drugs and medicines
  • impact of warfare on medical technologies
  • challenges faced by those seeking to transform the health of British children
  • changes and continuities in health and healtcare in Britain since 1800
  • effects of work and workplaces on individual and environmental health
  • intersection of rece, ethnicity and health in America
  • concepts of and treatments for mental health in modern societies
  • intersection of gender, sexuality and health since 1800

The degree is suitable for those from humanities, social science and health science backgrounds as well as those who have worked in the health professions.

The MSc Health History is organised around the expertise of staff in the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare (CSHHH) Glasgow. The CSHHH is a research collaboration between historians of medicine and of health and healthcare at Glasgow Caledonian and Strathclyde universities.

You’ll study

Modules can be built into a Masters degree. This can form the basis for future doctoral research funded by the:

  • Wellcome Trust
  • Arts & Humanities Research Council
  • Economic & Social Research Council

Compulsory class

  • Sources, Skills & Methods for Historians

Optional classes

Choose four from:

  • Health & Healthcare in the Long 19th Century
  • Pharmaceuticals, Ethics & Health, 1800 to 1980
  • Governing Highs & Health: History & the Control of Drugs, c1800 to c1945
  • Work & Occupational Health in the 20th Century: Comparative Perspectives
  • Food & Health in the West during the 20th Century
  • The Politics of Health in 20th-century Britain
  • Medicine & Warfare, 1800 to 2000
  • Race, Ethnicity and Health in 20th-century America
  • Gender, Health and Modern Medicine Since 1800

Dissertation

MSc students also write a dissertation of 10,000 words. You’ll research a topic of your choice, under the supervision of a member of the programme staff. You’ll be able to use the extensive archive holdings relating to the history of medicine and of health and healthcare available in Glasgow and elsewhere in Central Scotland.

Seminars

The CSHHH Glasgow seminar series is designed to showcase the latest research from across the subject area at the centre. All students on the MSc are expected to attend these sessions.

Assessment

A full account of assessment will be provided in each module handbook. The pass mark is 50% in all classes.



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This MA programme introduces students to major works of 19th and 20th-century British, French and American writers and provides a context for those works in philosophical and technological developments of the period. Read more

This MA programme introduces students to major works of 19th and 20th-century British, French and American writers and provides a context for those works in philosophical and technological developments of the period. The programme explores a wide range of genres and authors and encourages the development of independent research skills.

About this degree

The core module develops a close reading of works by writers of the period, while the optional modules offer the opportunity to analyse some of the technologies, media, philosophical perspectives and art forms whose development during the 20th century has made itself felt in modernist and postmodernist writing.

Students undertake modules to the value of 180 credits.

The programme consists of one core module (60 credits), three optional modules (60 credits) and a research dissertation (60 credits).

Core module

  • Authors (including Gustave Flaubert, D.H. Lawrence; T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Ralph Ellison, Alfred Hitchcock, Sylvia Plath, Toni Morrison, Alan Hollinghurst, David Foster Wallace). Please see UCL English website for more.

Optional modules

  • The majority of students elect to take Contexts, which explores the relationship between modern culture and the city from the 1860s to the present day, and may include the following topics:
  • The Body and Technology
  • Catastrophe and the City
  • Psychogeography
  • Class and the City
  • The Harlem Renaissance
  • Hollywood Fiction
  • Queer Fictions and the City
  • Students then take further optional modules. Options available change every year, but in recent years have included:
  • Contemporary Poetry
  • American Counter-Culture
  • 21st Century Fiction
  • Modernism, Sex and Redemption
  • Afrofuturism
  • Inventions of Cinema
  • Marxist Aesthetics in the 20th Century
  • Cultures of Chance: Accident, Error, and Catastrophe in post-1945 Literature and Culture
  • Global Anglophone Literature

Dissertation/report

All MA students undertake an independent research project which culminates in a dissertation of 12,000 words.

Teaching and learning

Each module is taught through a weekly seminar. Assessment is through take-home written examination, essays and the research dissertation.

Further information on modules and degree structure is available on the department website: English: Issues in Modern Culture MA

Careers

The programme is an ideal preliminary stage to doctoral research and candidates who obtain the MA and have found a promising subject requiring further study are encouraged to apply to the UCL MPhil/PhD programme.

Recent career destinations for this degree

  • Assistant Editor, Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Commissioning Editor, CIPD (Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development)
  • Copywriter / Strategist, Zenith Optimedia
  • Researcher, AMVBBDO
  • Copywriter, Freelance Copywriter

Careers data is taken from the ‘Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education’ survey undertaken by HESA looking at the destinations of UK and EU students in the 2013–2015 graduating cohorts six months after graduation.

Why study this degree at UCL?

UCL English has an outstanding record for research; many staff publish in mainstream as well as academic media: some are regular reviewers for newspapers and periodicals.

Excellent facilities are provided by the UCL library. It has several important holdings including the James Joyce Collection and the George Orwell Archive.

Our graduate students have access to an incomparable range of archives and libraries, including Senate House Library and the British Library, both of which are nearby.

Research Excellence Framework (REF)

The Research Excellence Framework, or REF, is the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. The 2014 REF was carried out by the UK's higher education funding bodies, and the results used to allocate research funding from 2015/16.

The following REF score was awarded to the department: English Language & Literature

85% rated 4* (‘world-leading’) or 3* (‘internationally excellent’)

Learn more about the scope of UCL's research, and browse case studies, on our Research Impact website.



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Explore a broad range of literature and culture from Britain, North America and the English-speaking world covering the 19th and 20th centuries. The course offers you the chance to delve into a range of research topics and texts from this period including Victorian Studies, Modernism, and American Studies. Read more

Explore a broad range of literature and culture from Britain, North America and the English-speaking world covering the 19th and 20th centuries. The course offers you the chance to delve into a range of research topics and texts from this period including Victorian Studies, Modernism, and American Studies. It will give you the opportunity to read widely and to think broadly across conventional period boundaries, with optional modules ranging from lyric poetry to the graphic novel. 

You'll be studying at one of the oldest English departments in the country in a fantastic central London location where you'll get the chance to explore the literature of the 19th and 20th centuries in a place where that literary history actually took place and you'll benefit from being in London, where the city and its rich literary heritage will be your classroom. 

As part of the course you will receive experience and training in a wide variety of research, writing and presentation skills and you'll get the chance to complete a large-scale research project within a research environment which values independent thought.

Key benefits

  • Unrivalled location in the centre of London, with easy access to the British Library and the major libraries and archives of the capital.
  • Flexible programme with a wide range of optional modules covering Victorian Studies, Modernism, and American and Transatlantic Studies allowing you to specialise in areas of yourchoice.
  • A dynamic, research-led department with an international reputation for excellence and special strengths in Victorian, Modernist and American literature.

Description

This course gives you an opportunity to explore a wide and eclectic range of topics and texts from the mid-19th centry to the present and to think across the period boundaries that restrict other courses. The course focuses on a broad range of 19th and 20th century literature and culture from Britain, North America and the English-speaking world. You will read widely in 19th century and Modernist literature, while also exploring more specialised topics through a range of optional modules which cover almost every aspect of modern literature and culture: from the Victorian novel and Modernist poetics to postcolonial life writing and the Graphic novel.

In semester one, the core module, Text, Culture, Theory: London and Urban Modernity, introduces key literary and theoretical approaches to urban modernity while encouraging you to explore the rich cultural history of our immediate surroundings in the cultural heart of London. King’s has the oldest English Department in the country and graduates will join an illustrious tradition of literary Londoners: writers, readers, and critics.

The course offers teaching and research training at postgraduate level in a wide range of aspects of English literature, language and culture, based in a research environment which values independence of thought and offers graduate students a clear sense of what would be involved in progressing to PhD study. Students receive training in research and writing skills (including manuscript work, bibliographies, internet resources) in preparation for the completion of a large-scale research project. 

Visit our department blog to find out more about English at King's.

Course purpose

This programme enables you to develop critical understanding of key texts and issues in 19th and 20th century English literature and acquire advanced skills in research methods that prepare you for doctoral study or for work within the broader cultural sector.

Course format and assessment

Teaching

If you are a full-time student, we will provide you with four to seven hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 26 hours of independent study.

If you are a part-time student, we will provide you with two to four hours of teaching each week through lectures and seminars. We will expect you to undertake 13 hours of independent study.

Assessment

We will assess our modules entirely through coursework, normally in the form of a 4,000-word essay. We will assess your dissertation module through a 4,000-word critical survey and a 15,000-word essay.

Career prospects

Many of our graduates go on to pursue further research. Others transfer the skills and knowledge they develop with us to careers in teaching, journalism, cultural arts and management or the legal and financial sectors.

Sign up for more information. Email now

Have a question about applying to King’s? Email now



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The Modern Languages MPhil is a research-based programme. You can specialise in topics in the languages of. Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American studies. Read more
The Modern Languages MPhil is a research-based programme. You can specialise in topics in the languages of: Chinese, French, German, Japanese and Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American studies. Specialism is also possible in translating and interpreting.

The Modern Languages MPhil is offered through the School of Modern Languages. We offer expert supervision in the following areas:

Chinese

-Chinese translating and interpreting
-Chinese numerology, number and gender in nursery rhymes (Dr V Pellatt)
-Cross-cultural studies between China and the West
-Chinese modernity studies
-Modern Chinese literature and culture
-Chinese-English translation
-Global Chinese diaspora studies
-Chinese-American studies
-Cultural theory (Prof J Qian)
-Contemporary society, especially identity, ethnicity and religion
-Minority nationalities (eg Xinjiang or Uyghur studies)
-Chinese state or popular nationalism and national identity
-Islam in China
-Performing arts, music cultures and popular culture in mainland China (Dr J Smith Finley)
-Transnational Chinese cinema
-Stardom
-Independent documentary filmmaking
-Gender and sexuality in Chinese media (Dr S Yu)

French

-Contemporary women's writing (Dr Robson, Dr El-Maïzi)
-19th century literature and culture (Prof Harkness, Prof Cross)
-Dialectology (Dr Hall)
-French and Algerian cinema (Prof Austin, Dr Leahy)
-History, politics and gender (Prof Cross, Prof Harkness)
-Language change (Dr Hall, Dr Waltereit)
-Popular culture (media, sport, music) and public policy (Dr Dauncey)
-Postcolonial cultures (Prof Austin, Dr El-Maïzi)
-Trauma and culture (Prof Austin, Dr Robson)

German

-20th century German and contemporary literature (Dr T Ludden, Dr B Müller)
-GDR literature and censorship (Dr B Müller)
-Representations of the Holocaust and/or World War II (Dr B Müller)
-Literature and philosophy - cultural and critical theory (Dr T Ludden)
-Women's writing (Dr T Ludden)
-Medieval German and comparative literature (Dr E Andersen)
-Morphological theory - morphology, phonology and dialectology of German and Dutch (Dr C Fehringer)

Japanese

-Gender studies (Dr G Hansen)
-Popular culture, film and media studies (Dr G Hansen, Dr S Yoshioka)
-Political studies (Dr G Hansen, Dr S Yoshioka)
-Literary studies (Dr G Hansen)

Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American studies

-Anthropology, anthropological linguistics and sociolinguistics of Latin America, including Quechua language (Prof Howard)
-Semantics, philosophy of language, history and spread of Spanish in Latin America, Latin American dialects and Creole (Prof Mackenzie)
-Political, social and intellectual history of Latin America in the 19th and 20th centuries, especially Brazil and Southern Cone (Prof Hentschke)
-History of education in Latin America in 19th and 20th century Latin America (Prof Hentschke, Dr Oliart, Prof Howard)
-Discourses of race and identity in Latin America (Prof Howard, Dr Oliart, Dr Morgan)
-Latin American film, literature and theatre (Dr Page)
-Spanish and Latin American cultural history and popular culture (Dr Catala Carracso, Dr Morgan, Dr Oliart, Dr Fernández)
-Catalan nationalism (Dr Catala-Carrasco)
-Spanish novel (Dr Catala Carrasco)

Translating and Interpreting

We can offer supervision for projects involving English plus Catalan, Chinese, Dutch, French, German, Hungarian, Italian, Quechua, Spanish, Bosnian, Croatian and Serbian.

Our research specialisms are:
-Interpreting (Dr Y Chen, Dr M Jin, Dr V Pellatt, Dr F Wu)
-Psycholinguistics of interpreting and translating (Dr M Jin)
-Translating literature (Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translation and culture (Dr Y Chen, Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translation and ethics, ideology and power (Prof R. Howard, Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translation products, processes and strategies (Dr Y Chen, Dr M Jin, Dr F Jones, Dr V Pellatt)
-Translator and interpreter training and assessment (Dr Y Chen, Dr V Pellatt, Dr F Wu)
-Reflective/autonomous learning and educational psychology (Dr Y Chen, Dr F Wu)
-Audiovisual translation studies (Dr Y Chen)

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This programme draws on our long-established strengths in research and teaching in Continental Philosophy. It is distinctive in offering an unusually broad range of module options specifically in this area of philosophy, covering major figures and themes, as well as more specialized or less mainstream topics. Read more

This programme draws on our long-established strengths in research and teaching in Continental Philosophy. It is distinctive in offering an unusually broad range of module options specifically in this area of philosophy, covering major figures and themes, as well as more specialized or less mainstream topics. Because of the breadth of our expertise in this area, whichever module option you choose, you will be taught by world leaders in their respective fields. Unlike some other postgraduate programmes, you’ll have the chance to choose all of your course work and your dissertation from the field of Continental Philosophy, although modules from other philosophical traditions or subject areas can also be taken.

There is no restriction on the selection of module options. If you are looking for a course that gives you an exposure to Continental Philosophy that is both broad and in-depth, this is likely to be the right course for you. The influential Leiter Report 2014-15 ranks our graduate programme 1st in the UK and 3rd internationally in the area 20th Century Continental Philosophy. In the category 19th Century Continental Philosophy we are ranked 1st in the UK and 6th internationally. The 2014 UK Research Excellence Framework (REF) ranks the research produced by our department as 1st in the UK.

On this course, you'll have the freedom to choose six modules from our department's extensive selection. You can view our complete listing of Philosophy modules on our module webpage. So, whether you're interested in Nietzsche, Kant's Aesthetics, Hegel's Science of Logic or 20th Century French Philosophy, you'll find modules here that suit you.

You might wish to take this MA as a self-standing degree, to enhance your knowledge of continental philosophy, or perhaps you wish to take this programme as an entry route to PhD research in Continental Philosophy. Either way, we'll offer you a comprehensive education in the Continental tradition.



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The School of History and Heritage offers advanced research opportunities in the subject of History. As a research student, you will have access to support and training which aims to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Read more
The School of History and Heritage offers advanced research opportunities in the subject of History.

As a research student, you will have access to support and training which aims to develop the practical and critical skills necessary for investigation and study at doctoral level. Direction will be available from a supervisory team and you have the opportunity to benefit from the School’s research expertise in areas including medieval history, gender history and modern British history.

Regular research seminars aim to provide a stimulating environment in which to discuss and debate theoretical concepts with fellow students, scholars and visiting academics. Strong links exist with the Schools of Film & Media, English & Journalism and Fine & Performing Arts and an interdisciplinary research culture facilitates collaboration with colleagues across a wide range of topics.

Research Areas, Projects & Topics

Research areas covered within the School include:
-Roman and Byzantine history
-Medieval ecclesiastical history
-20th Century British political history
-History and culture in the 19th Century
-Gender history
-Urban history
-Early modern science and medicine
-Late antique and medieval Spain
-Imperial history
-20th Century mass culture

How You Study

Study at MPhil/PhD level takes the form of supervised individual research. You work on one topic of your choice for the duration of the study period. On a regular basis, you are expected to produce appropriate written work, submit it to your supervisors, then meet with your supervisors to receive feedback on your submission and agree the next stage of work.

Due to the nature of postgraduate research programmes, the vast majority of your time will be spent in independent study and research. You will have meetings with your academic supervisor, however the regularity of these will vary depending on your own individual requirements, subject area, staff availability and the stage of your programme.

How You Are Assessed

The assessment at this level of study takes the form of an 80,000 word thesis.

A PhD is awarded based on the quality of your thesis and your ability in an oral examination (viva voce) to present and successfully defend your chosen research topic to a group of academics. You are also expected to demonstrate how your research findings have contributed to knowledge or developed existing theory or understanding.

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The two-year full-time study programme (120 ECTS) focuses on European philosophy from Descartes to the present day and is especially designed for international students who aim for a first class education in modern and contemporary European philosophy. Read more

About the course

The two-year full-time study programme (120 ECTS) focuses on European philosophy from Descartes to the present day and is especially designed for international students who aim for a first class education in modern and contemporary European philosophy. The programme offers an in depth study of European philosophy beginning with classical rationalism and empiricism, moving on to Kant and German Idealism, and concluding with 20th century and contemporary philosophy.

Aims

As a student, you will

• acquire high-level academic education in modern and contemporary European philosophy with a strong focus on research
• get profound insights into historical developments and systematic problems of modern and contemporary European philosophy
• choose from optional courses in other disciplines (history, linguistics, political sciences etc.)
• benefit from credited German and French language courses
• have the opportunity to do a credited internship organised by the Institute of Philosophy (EU institutions, media, museums, industry etc.)

Course modules

• Early modern European philosophy
• Kant and German idealism
• 20th century and contemporary European philosophy
• Master colloquium
• Electives

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In Milan, the programme aims to train graduates capable of changing and transforming the environment in its physical, architectural and landscape elements focusing the attention on various scales, on aspects of composition, on functional, historical and technical aspects, as well as on the various requirements for sustainability and environmental compatibility. Read more

Mission and Goals

In Milan, the programme aims to train graduates capable of changing and transforming the environment in its physical, architectural and landscape elements focusing the attention on various scales, on aspects of composition, on functional, historical and technical aspects, as well as on the various requirements for sustainability and environmental compatibility. Critical attention is devoted to cultural and social changes.

A complete set of courses and laboratories is taught in English (curricula “Architecture” and "Architecture of Interiors").

Career Opportunities

The Master of Science in Architecture produces highly qualified designers, recognised by the European Union, thereby opening extensive fields of professional opportunity in the industry. Graduates of our MSc programme are currently working as independent professionals, for Public Administration, research institutes, private firms both in Italy and abroad.

Presentation

See http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/uploads/media/Architecture-Leo.pdf
The programme provides advanced training in the field of Architectural Design and in the field of Architecture of Interiors (two different curricula). It aims to train graduates capable of changing and transforming the environment in its physical, architectural and landscape elements focusing the attention on various scales, on aspects of composition, on functional, historical and technical aspects, as well as on the various requirements for sustainability and environmental compatibility. Critical attention is devoted to cultural and social changes. Politecnico di Milano has been home to many wellknown architects of the 20th century: Renzo Piano, Franco Albini, Achille Castiglioni, Franca Helg, Ernesto Nathan Rogers, Aldo Rossi, etc. Beside curricular activities, the School provides a number of international seminars, conferences, workshops and study visits to enhance academic development.
Graduates of our MSc programme are currently working as independent professionals, for Public Administration, research institutes, private firms both in Italy and abroad. The programme is taught in English.

Subjects

The following is a sample of a typical study plan:

- First year:
History and Theory of Late 20th Century, Architecture, Construction Techniques, Contemporary Architectural Design Theory and Techniques, Architectural Design Studio, Town Planning Design, Architectural Restoration Studio.

- Second year:
Architectural Design & Construction studio, Architectural Design studio, Project Appraisal, Elective and Thematic Courses, Internship, final thesis.

See the website http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/architecture/

Find out how to apply here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/how-to-apply/

For contact information see here http://www.polinternational.polimi.it/educational-offer/laurea-magistrale-equivalent-to-master-of-science-programmes/architecture/

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Southern Europe is a region that finds itself at the cutting edge of key global challenges. South European Studies offers the stimulating experience of studying and training in three different European countries in the region and the opportunity to acquire advanced language, research and professional skills. Read more

Southern Europe is a region that finds itself at the cutting edge of key global challenges. South European Studies offers the stimulating experience of studying and training in three different European countries in the region and the opportunity to acquire advanced language, research and professional skills.

Why This Programme

  • The programme is unique in examining Southern Europe as a distinct region with its own identity and global role. Themes include democracy and protest, migration, social and economic change, nationalism, European integration and the new trade and security challenges that are reshaping the region.
  • Multiple mobilities allow for a truly international learning experience. Immersion into South European society and culture, experience of diverse educational systems, and needs-based language training in all major South European languages offer in depth knowledge of the region.
  • Research and professional tracks are available for maximum choice in curriculum building. The research track leads to a dissertation while the professional track leads to a substantial work placement and a professional project. 
  • Consortium partners include University of Glasgow, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Aix-Marseille Université, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, LUISS Guido Carli Rome and Instituto de Ciências Sociais da Universidade de Lisboa.
  • An innovative summer school offering dissertation training will be held annually over 10 days in July in Lisbon, Portugal.
  • Guest lectures and seminars are offered by scholars and policy practitioners who are leading experts in their field.

PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

The programme is taught over 24 months and includes three mobility periods. In semester 1 you gain an overview of the subject in Glasgow, followed by a choice of mobility partner in semester 2 (Athens or Madrid). Here you will follow a geographical pathway that situates the region in its broader neighbourhood context. Semester 2 also includes an online research and training course. A summer school featuring dissertation/project workshops and meetings with the supervisory teams will be held at the end of semester 2 in Lisbon.

In semester 3 you will have the choice of four thematic pathways along the research track in Athens, Madrid, Aix-en-Provence or Rome. Alternatively, you may follow a professional track that includes a lengthy work placement available in Madrid or Aix-en-Provence. You will spend semester 4 with the same semester 3 mobility partner researching and writing your dissertation or professional project under the guidance of a supervisory team made up of members of staff from each of your chosen mobility partners. If on the professional track you will also undertake a substantial work placement in S4. Please note semesters 3 and 4 cannot be spent with the same partner as semester 2.

Teaching will be via lectures and small group seminars utilising a wealth of theoretical and methodological approaches drawn from the humanities and social sciences. Assignments and coursework include individual and group presentations, structured debates, simulation exercises and role play, reflective logs, fieldwork and study trips. Language courses in all major South European languages are available with each mobility partner over the two years of the programme.

Year 1 - semester 1

University of Glasgow – Overview

  • Research design
  • Politics and society in Southern Europe
  • Southern Europe in international affairs.

Year 1 – semester 2

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens – Greece and the Balkans

  • Contemporary Turkey: Domestic and foreign policy
  • International law and peaceful settlement of disputes in Southeast Europe
  • Nationalism in South Eastern Europe. 

Universidad Autónoma de Madrid* – Spain and the Arab world

  • Elections and electoral behaviour
  • Management and public administration
  • Political Islam in the Magreb and Mashreq 
  • Processes of democratic transition in the Arab World
  • Research seminar.

Introduction to quantitative and qualitative methods in the social sciences (online)

Instituto de Ciências Sociais da Universidade de Lisboa – Dissertation workshops (summer school)

Year 2 – semester 3

Research track

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens – Crisis and change

  • European Union enlargement to Southeast Europe
  • Greek politics: Political economy, crisis and change
  • Interconnected histories: The Balkans and the Black Sea from the 18th to the 20th century.

Universidad Autónoma de Madrid* – Nationalism

  • Public policy analysis
  • Representation and political participation
  • Seminar in comparative politics
  • Theories of nationalism.

Aix-Marseille Université – Borders

  • Borders, territory and conflict in Euro-Mediterranean space
  • Euro-Mediterranean immigration policies
  • Nationalism, religion and identity in the Balkans
  • Patrimony, culture and sustainable development in the Mediterranean
  • Political transitions in Southern Europe
  • Writings and representations of the Mediterranean Sea

LUISS Guido Carli –Democratisation

  • Business and economics in the Mediterranean area
  • European institutions
  • European macroeconomics
  • European politics in the 20th century
  • History of South European enlargements
  • Security and migration in the Mediterranean.

Professional track

Aix-Marseille Université

  • Mediterranean economies
  • Methodologies for the professional project and the traineeship
  • Patrimony, culture and sustainable development in the Mediterranean
  • Politics, governance and institutional actors in the Euro-Mediterranean framework
  • Professional seminars
  • Project and team management.

Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

  • same as research track

Year 2 – semester 4

Research track

Athens/Madrid/Aix-en-Provence/Rome – Dissertation

Professional track

Aix-Marseille Université

  • Internship report
  • Methodology for the applied research project
  • Professional project.

Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

  • Contemporary political theory
  • Internship/Project
  • Research seminar.

*Additonal courses available in English and Spanish.

Career Prospects

Career prospects include the civil service, diplomacy, regional organisations such as the Union for the Mediterranean and the European Union, international organisations such as NATO and the United Nations, journalism, public opinion and market research, non-governmental organisations and charities, teaching, academic research, business, tourism and international trade.



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This absorbing MA gives you the opportunity to study and reflect on major 20th century events, such as total war, the rise and fall of communism, the collapse of the European empires, the changing place of women in western society and the decline of traditional religious belief. Read more
This absorbing MA gives you the opportunity to study and reflect on major 20th century events, such as total war, the rise and fall of communism, the collapse of the European empires, the changing place of women in western society and the decline of traditional religious belief.

You’ll be able to:-

explore the features that made the twentieth century unique
study social and political developments that most defined the character of the twentieth century
focus in-depth on particular countries or themes that interest you
develop the research skills needed to complete your 15,000 word dissertation on the topic of your choice
This programme will appeal to a wide range of students, including those who’ve recently or have decided to return to university later in life.

The structure of the course provides a good grounding for those intending to proceed to doctoral research.



Students study two 30-credit core modules and four 15-credit research training modules, culminating in a 60- credit dissertation.

Why History?

Breadth of expertise

The interests of our staff and PhD students are extremely diverse and span the medieval, early modern and modern periods.

Their work encompasses political, social, cultural, economic, military and diplomatic history, across Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and the Americas.

Active seminar programmes, linked to our research centres and MA programmes, enable staff and postgraduates to present their work and listen to eminent visiting speakers.

These are our on-going seminar series:

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
Contemporary Cultural and Social
History
International Slavery
Contemporary History and Policy
New Research (run by our postgraduate students)
Recent conferences and workshops have addressed ‘Religion in the Spanish Baroque’, ‘Text and Place in Medieval and Early Modern Europe’, ‘Re-thinking Post- Slavery’ and ‘British Nuclear Culture’.

Taught programmes that prepare you for future research

By pursuing our programmes you’ll gain the skills and knowledge you need to carry out further research towards a PhD.

Our MA programmes are taught by research-active experts who bring their knowledge of, and passion for, their subjects into the seminar room.

Teaching takes place in small-group seminars or workshops and through one-to-one tutorials, as we believe this leads to the best collaboration between students and staff.

We offer programmes in:-

Cultural History
Eighteenth-Century Worlds
International Slavery Studies
Medieval and Renaissance Studies
Twentieth-Century History
You can also pursue an MRes in History or a vocational Masters in Archives and Records Management.

Support and skills training for PhD students

As a postgraduate research student you’ll receive comprehensive skills from the Graduate School, the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences and History Department.

This will equip you with the research skills you need to successfully complete your PhD.

Our PhD programmes place a strong emphasis on independent research and study, culminating in a 100,000-word dissertation. Two supervisors (normally experts in your chosen field) who will advise and support you through the process.

Our commitment to postgraduate students

We welcome enquiries from all postgraduate students interested in studying here and will give you all the academic, practical and pastoral support we can.

Students have a voice here and are represented on the School Postgraduate Committee. There’s also a dedicated staff – student liaison committee to oversee our MA and PhD programmes.

Postgraduate studentships and bursaries are often available.

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The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition. Read more
The course (Standard Track) allows students to specialise in music after 1900. Typically students this area will be approached through a combination of different angles, such as historical musicology, analysis, performance and composition.

This will be aided by a broader look at techniques, methodologies and approaches (through the core module in either Composition or Musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in 20th-/21st-Century Music. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area.

WMP4052: Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas related to music after 1900, including:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Performance / Composition with Live Electronics
Sacred Music Studies
Analysis
Arts Administration
Music Studio Techniques
Popular Music Studies
Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects (with a focus on music after 1900) can be studied.

(Total of 120 credits)

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation or critical edition.

(60 credits)

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (40 Credits).
Compulsory Core Module: Current Musicology (30 credits)
Open submission: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject: 20th-/21st-Century Music (60 Credits)
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (30 credits)
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) are chosen from the following areas (with emphasis on music after 1900):

Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Sacred Music Studies, Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only)

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Do you want to define your own path in literary and cultural studies? Take the opportunity to further your understanding of Modernity or eighteenth-century studies, or pursue your own interests and passions, with our MA English and Culture. Read more
Do you want to define your own path in literary and cultural studies? Take the opportunity to further your understanding of Modernity or eighteenth-century studies, or pursue your own interests and passions, with our MA English and Culture. On this diverse and challenging degree you’ll gain advanced research skills, which you’ll apply throughout your studies and beyond. Learn more about an existing area of interest, or discover something new on our highly adaptable and varied MA.

Key features

-Develop your research interests in the eighteenth century or Modernity studies, or carve your own path with a general MA spanning different periods.
-Define your own programme with modules which rotate yearly, giving you a fresh choice each year.
-Benefit from small tutorial groups across all modules, providing you with invaluable face-to-face contact with your tutors.
-Choose from modules closely integrated with staff research interests, whilst being able to pursue your own ideas.
-Hone your skills with a compulsory initial module which shows you how to carry out postgraduate research.
-Benefit from adaptable study routes, allowing you to find a means of studying which fits around your other commitments.
-Access resources at any time with the University library, open 24 hours, 365 days a year, offering a vast range of electronic and print materials, including a rare books collection.
-Engage closely with unique local resources such as the nationally designated eighteenth-century Cottonian Collection, or the University’s own rare books collection stocked with 19th century and 20th century periodicals.
-Build on your experience - some of our students have been involved in curating exhibitions and organising conferences.
-Make the most of a rich cultural environment with Plymouth University’s Peninsula Arts programme and the University’s links with local arts organisations, like the Theatre Royal.

Course details

In your first term you’ll take our compulsory research methods module. In addition, you’ll take a further three modules from those listed below – the combination depends on the award you wish to achieve at the end of the MA. The spring term and summer period will see you take the dissertation module in a subject of your choice, involving one-on-one supervision and support. This will be a chance to work independently on a project which interests and excites you. On a part-time route, you can complete the programme over either two or three years. After completing research methods in the first term, you’ll usually study one module per term for two years (although other arrangements are possible). This works out at three contact hours per week, plus independent reading and study of around 20 hours per week. You’ll then do your dissertation in the spring and summer of the second year, finishing the MA in two years, or defer the dissertation to the following year and complete in three years.

Core modules
-MAEL708 Poetry and the Modern Self
-MALT712 Fictions of femininity in eighteenth-century England
-MAEL700 Research Methods and Debates in Literary and Cultural Studies
-ENMA706 The Legacy of War: Fiction of the 1920's and 1930's

Optional modules
-MALT760 MA English and Culture Dissertation (Art, Architecture and Literature in the Eighteenth Century)
-MAEL740 MA English and Culture Dissertation
-ENMA720 MA English and Culture Dissertation (Literature and Modernity, 1860 - 1960)

Every postgraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the programme aims, the programme structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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