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Masters Degrees (2.5 Gpa)

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The Department of Archaeology and History of Art offers a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of archaeology, the history of art and visual culture, cultural heritage management, and museum studies by employing the most recent theoretical and methodological approaches and a hands-on approach to learning. Read more
The Department of Archaeology and History of Art offers a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of archaeology, the history of art and visual culture, cultural heritage management, and museum studies by employing the most recent theoretical and methodological approaches and a hands-on approach to learning. Our faculty consists of specialists in the archaeology and history of art of the civilizations that have flourished in the area of modern Turkey. Students will learn about prehistoric Anatolian archaeology, the Greek and Roman eras, Late Antique and Byzantine studies, and the Ottoman period, and can decide to focus more specifically on one of these time periods. Cultural heritage management practices and museum operations are inseparable from the study of archaeology and the history of art, and students will also be instructed in these areas during their four-year undergraduate program. Students in our department have the opportunity to take courses in ancient languages of the Mediterranean and Anatolian worlds such as Greek, Latin, and Ottoman Turkish. Our lectures are enriched through field trips to archaeological sites and museum excursions, and participation in conferences and workshops organized by visiting lecturers and specialists from Turkey and abroad. We provide hands-on training in methods of analysis and conservation in our archaeological laboratory. Our students are also encouraged to participate in one of our archaeological excavation projects during the summer or to complete internships with museums or cultural heritage organizations.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Archaeology: Archaeology of the Neolitic, Chalcolithic, Bronze or Iron Ages.
• Hellenistic and Roman Art, architecture and archeology.
• Late Antique and Byzantine Art, architecture and archeology.
• Museum studies and cultural heritape management.

Entry Requirements

1. GPA: 2.5 minimum

2. GRE (foreign students) score with the following minimum scores.
GRE: 149 (new exam format), or 610 (older exam format), the minimum scores refer only to the quantitative section

3. English proficiency exam. Applicants need to have taken one of the following exams and have at least the minimum score listed below. Native English speakers do not need to take an English exam.
TOEFL: Paper based (550/4), IBT (80/120)
IELTS: 6.5

4. Statement of purpose: In addition to telling us about your academic background, try to be as specific as possible about which topics you would like to study and research while at Koç University.

5. Two letters of recommendation
Two recommendation letters are required for M.A. applications.

6.Writing Sample
The writing sample should be at least eight pages and could be a research paper or an article. We would prefer the writing sample to be in English, but if your previous academic training has been in another language, we can accept a sample in another language.

7. Interviews
A short list of candidates will be invited for an interview, either in person or through Skype.

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The Department of Psychology aims at producing theoretical and applied research, scholarship, and teaching at a quality that meets and even exceeds the national and international academic standards and at addressing issues that are relevant to national and human development. Read more
The Department of Psychology aims at producing theoretical and applied research, scholarship, and teaching at a quality that meets and even exceeds the national and international academic standards and at addressing issues that are relevant to national and human development. The Department seeks active participation of the students in such research projects, to help them gain first-hand experience in conducting research and to familiarize them with issues that are of concern to human development.
The department expects the students to gain knowledge in almost all fields of psychology and to be aware of different approaches to psychology. The interests of the faculty include a wide range of areas such as cognitive, social, cross-cultural, organizational, developmental psychology, and psychology of language. Students get a chance to actively participate in national and international research projects that are conducted by our faculty. The department also regularly invites leading national and international scholars in psychology to introduce students to the field at large.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Culture and Self
• Social Development
• Industrial and Organizational Psychology
• Social Psychology
• Social Cognition
• Attitudes, Persuasion and Social Influence
• Social Development
• Cognitive Development
• Cognitive Models and Theories
• Human Memory
• Conditioning and Learning
• Neural Bases of Memory
• Cognitive Neuroscience
• Science, Technology, and Society
• Gender Inequalities
• Crime and Deviance
• Language development
• Program evaluation
• Prevention
• Positive youth development

Entry Requirements

1. GPA: 2.5 minimum

2. GRE (foreign students) score with the following minimum scores.
GRE: 149 Quantitative section

3. English proficiency exam. Applicants need to have taken one of the following exams and have at least the minimum score listed below. Native English speakers do not need to take an English exam.
TOEFL IBT (80/120)
IELTS: 6.5

4. Statement of purpose: In addition to telling us about your academic background, try to be as specific as possible about which topics you would like to study and research while at Koç University.

5. Two letters of recommendation
Two recommendation letters are required for M.A. applications.

6. Interviews
A short list of candidates will be invited for an interview, either in person or through Skype.

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Click Here (http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id605) to view the states from which the Capstone College of Nursing currently accepts applications for admission. Read more

State Authorizations

Click Here (http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id=605) to view the states from which the Capstone College of Nursing currently accepts applications for admission.

Visit the website http://nursing.ua.edu/?page_id=184

Transfer of Graduate Credit for MSN:

Acceptable graduate credit of up to twelve credit hours, earned in a regionally accredited institution in which the student was enrolled in that institution’s graduate school, may be transferred and applied to the requirements for a master’s degree if approved by the CCN and Graduate School.

Consideration of credit does not guarantee transfer. Evaluation of credit for transfer will not be made until after the student has enrolled in the Graduate School of The University of Alabama.

Further information can be found in the UA Graduate Student Catalog (http://graduate.ua.edu/academics/doctoral.html#credit).

Admission Requirements for MSN:

Admission requirements are consistent with those of the Graduate School. Applicants for the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) will be considered on a competitive basis.

- Nurses who are interested in the Case Management Program, NP Concentration, and CNL Program are encouraged to contact the Capstone College of Nursing (CCN) Graduate Recruitment and Retention Liaison. Currently only residents of Alabama and Mississippi are eligible for the Nurse Practitioner Concentration.

Note: Currently, only baccalaureate prepared registered nurses who are residents of Alabama and Mississippi are eligible for admission to the NP concentration. There is no post-master’s certificate option. Please check this site in the future for changes in the residency requirement.

Application Process for MSN:

Enrollment into the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program is available for fall semester each year. Your completed application must be received by the April 1st deadline.

MSN Application Process

1. Begin your graduate application at the Graduate School’s Application Center.

2. Request transcripts following the Graduate School’s transcript instructions.

3. Submit supporting documents. Within 48 hours of submitting the initial part of your application, you will receive an e-mail with your Campus-Wide Identification (CWID) number. It is very important that you safeguard this number. Once you have received this e-mail, you will need to submit the following documents through Manage Supporting Documents.

- Statement of purpose
- Resume or curriculum vitae
- Contact information for two references – The references should be professionals who can provide insight regarding your potential for success in the doctoral program. The Graduate School will contact these references via e-mail.
- Copy of active RN license from every state in which you are licensed. Note: Licensure must be maintained throughout the program.

Additionally, we may require the following:

- Official MAT or GRE score – If your grade point average (GPA) is lower than a 3.0, based on a 4.0 sytem, either overall or in your last 60 hours, an acceptable Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or must be submitted by the testing service to the Graduate School, Box 870118, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487. Test scores may not be older than 5 years of the application date. Use school code 1012 for MAT and 1830 for GRE.

- English proficiency exam score – Whether an international or a permanent resident, if your first language is not English, you must submit an official score report from one of the following proficiency examinations: Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), International English Language Testing System (IELTS), or Pearson Test of English (PTE).

Upon admission, you will receive written notification of admission from the Dean of the Graduate School. You will also receive a letter from the Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs at CCN outlining requirements for entry into the MSN program.

Documents Required Prior to Registration (after admitted)

Documents below should be completed and signed where appropriate and sent to Christina Horen at or faxed to 205-348-6674. A hold will be placed on your student record until all documents have been received. You are responsible for keeping all documents current throughout enrollment including annual health requirements (see CCN Graduate Student Handbook).

- Current RN license verification
- Current CPR certification for healthcare professionals
- Program of Study
- OSHA Training for Infection Control, Bloodborne Pathogens, and Safety
- HIPAA Privacy and Security Training
- Information Literacy for the 21st Century Training
- Nursing Student Health and Physical Exam Form
- Graduate Student TB Test and Immunization Form
- Substance Abuse Policy and Drug/Alcohol Testing Policy
- Academic Dishonesty Form
- Progression Policy
- Consent to Release and Disclose Form

MSN Degree Requirements:

The MSN will be awarded to the student who has met the following requirements:

- GPA of 3.0 or higher
- Good standing at the time of graduation
- Successful completion of the required coursework

In addition for CNL only:

- Completion of CNL Self-assessment Exam and CNL Certification Exam

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). Read more

Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). This lecture, seminar and laboratory based MSc equips you with the theoretical and practical skills knowledge of how to study and interpret data collected from human remains. The emphasis is on health and well-being using a multidisciplinary approach, linking biological evidence for disease with cultural data (the bioarchaeological approach). This course is unique in the world and it takes a holistic view of disease, as seen in a clinical contexts today, and will prepare you for undertaking significant research projects in this subject, or working in contract/commercial archaeology, and many other fields. It is aimed at graduates mainly in archaeology and anthropology with or without past experience of knowledge in this field, and for those who aspire to continue into a PhD programme or work in contract archaeology. However, past students have come from a variety of subject backgrounds, and destination data illustrate a wide range of employments take these students.

Course Structure

Two taught modules in the Epiphany term (Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science and Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton), and two taught modules in Michaelmas term (Palaeopathology: Theory and Method; Themes in Palaeopathology), with the double module dissertation over Easter term and the summer (submitted early September).

Core Modules

  • Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
  • Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton
  • Palaeopathology: Theory and Method
  • Themes in Palaeopathology
  • Dissertation (double module).

Course Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in bioarchaeology. Seminars then provide opportunities for smaller groups of you to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that you have gained through your lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Finally, practical laboratory classes allow you to gain direct practical skills in the recording and interpretation of data from skeletal remains. The latter provide an important element of the programme in allowing independent and group work, as well as hands-on experience under laboratory conditions, essential for a potential future working environment.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as you develop your knowledge and ability as independent learners, giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject.

In Term 1 you will typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Outside timetabled contact hours, you are also expected to undertake your own independent study to prepare for your classes and broaden your subject knowledge. External speakers specialising in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

In Term 2 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required for recording and interpreting skeletal data (age at death, sex, normal variation), to further developing skills for palaeopathological data recording and their interpretation and understanding the limitations. In addition, the Themes module aims to develop in students a critical approach to the evaluation of multiple forms of evidence, beyond that for human remains, for the reconstruction of specific themes. It focuses on discussion and debate of different related issues. In Term 2 you will typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Again, external speakers specialising in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and research continues in Term 3 and beyond, where the research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the dissertation research project. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have three one-to-one supervisory meetings, you will undertake a detailed study of a particular area, resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further professional or academic work. In Term 3 students are given the opportunity to attend a Careers Session in the Department where past graduates of the course talk about their career trajectories since graduating.

Throughout the programme, you will have access to an “academic adviser”, or in the case of this MSc the two Directors (Professor Charlotte Roberts and Dr Rebecca Gowland), who provide you with academic support and guidance. Typically a student meets their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend. Additionally, the students who attend the MSc Palaeopathology course are provided with the opportunity to attend journal paper critique sessions each term, and human bioarchaeology seminars given by PhD students.

Career Opportunities

Many of our postgraduates move into an academic career, either teaching or by taking up post-doctoral research positions in universities. Others join museums or national and regional heritage organisations. Some work in professional archaeology, in national or local planning departments, while others elect to use their analytical and presentation skills to gain positions in industry, commerce and government.



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With a master’s degree in Web Science you will be able to study and solve problems on the web. Our interdisciplinary curriculum emphasises computer science and builds bridges to social sciences, economics, studies of the law, linguistics and mathematics. Read more

About the Program

With a master’s degree in Web Science you will be able to study and solve problems on the web. Our interdisciplinary curriculum emphasises computer science and builds bridges to social sciences, economics, studies of the law, linguistics and mathematics. All mandatory courses are taught in English.

In general, our programme aims at people with a bachelor’s degree or a minor in computer science. Our programme even is free of tuition. The medium of instruction is English.

More information under: http://west.uni-koblenz.de/en/mws

Employment Outlook

Graduates from the institute WeST have found interesting positions at successful companies, started their own businesses or continued towards a Ph.D. Institute WeST has a limited number of places available each year for pursueing a Ph.D. If you excel earning a master's degree in Web Science you will be in pole position for continuing with doctoral studies.

Studying in Koblenz

Koblenz is one of the oldest and most attractive cities in Germany with its surroundings honoured as UNESCO World Cultural Heritage. The university of Koblenz-Landau has close contacts to leading companies, offering possibilities for internships, collaboration and project experiences.

Program Structure

Our interdisciplinary curriculum emphasises computer science and builds bridges to social sciences, economics, law, linguistics and mathematics. All mandatory courses are taught in English.

The curriculum is organized in seven module groups:

Foundations of Web Science (two modules) establishes the main idea of Web Science. It provides an interdisciplinary primary view of the web and of more abstract web structures.

The Computer Science track (three modules) teaches the essential technical aspects, namely web engineering, semantic web and web retrieval.

Web and Society (two out of four modules) considers interaction of the web and different user groups: citizens, customers, entrepreneurs, and interest groups.

The module group Elective Courses in Computer Science provides a wide range of technical topics. Modules may be choosen freely from all Master courses in computer science with relevance to the web given at the University of Koblenz-Landau (three modules or more, mininum 18 ECTS).

Elective Interdisciplinary Courses contain web-related modules offered by our university from other disciplines (such as economy, social sciences, linguistics, anthropology, communication theory etc.). Students have to freely elect at least two modules (12 ECTS).

Topics for seminars and research lab can be freely chosen from Web Science subjects. Furthermore, this module group contains a social skills and leadership training..

The topic of the master's thesis can also be freely chosen from any Web Science subjects.

More information about the curriculum can also be found under: http://west.uni-koblenz.de/en/mws/curriculum

Requirements

Higher Education Entrance Qualification -

It is a legal requirement in Germany that students own a Higher education entrance qualification („Hochschulzugangsberechtigung“) respectively a Master entrance qualification („Masterzugangsberechtigung“), proven by school leaving certificates or studies completed at secondary education level.

Entrance qualification is not checked by us, but uni-assist (see application process), therefore please refrain from asking us if your diploma will be accepted. Uni-assist provides some further information on higher education entrance qualification.

Academic Background in Computer Science -

You need some academic background in computer science, such as a

bachelor's degree in computer science, business informatics, Computervisualistik (as offered by the University of Koblenz-Landau), Information management (as offered by the University of Koblenz-Landau until 2012 if 60 ECTS in computer science were acquired) or similar.

Students with a minor in computer science (at least 60 European Credit Points) can apply, too. Here we have to make a decision on a by-case-basis. To get an educated guess please contact the course guidance.

Only diplomas of international accredited universities will be accepted. If you are unshure if your academic background fulfils our requirements, do not hesitate to contact us: . Non-academic, practical experience in computer science alone does not qualify you for our programme.

Sufficient Grades in Previous Studies -

The German grading system ranges from 1 ("very good") to 6 ("insufficient"). Lower numbers mean better grades. To be eligible for our programme, the grades from your previous studies must be between 1 and 2.5. Grade conversion into the German system is done by uni-assist (cf. application procedure), so we cannot tell you if your GPA fis sufficient. For a first, non-binding estimation on your eligibility you might want to check the calculator provided by the University of Paderborn.

English Language Proficiency -

The medium of instruction for all required courses is English, some additional electives can be taken in German. Thus, we require a certain level of English proficiency such that studies can be undertaken successfully. Thus, a standardised language certificate is required – proof that your previous studies were held in English are not sufficient and not negiotiable. We accept three types of language proficiency certificates:

a TOEFL result of at least 79 (internet based), 550 (paper based) or 213 (computer based)

IELTS test with 6.5 points mininum

Cambridge certificate at level B2 or higher (find an exam center)

Proficiency of German language is not a requirement for application. However, additional elective courses are available in German, and we recommend to learn some basic German for daily life. Some hints on learning German can be found at Deutsche Welle.

Motivational Letter -

Applicants need to supply a motivational letter. Please do not send lenghty standard letters describing your general interest in computer science and your appreciation of the German education system. Instead, refer only to our specific programme and follow these guidelines:

Length should be between 150 and 300 words.

The letter must be written in English.

Specify what you learnt and found particularly interesting in your previous studies or practical experiences. Tell us how you want to deepen these previous experience in our master's programme. You can also describe what you expect to learn here for your future job. You should always refer to our curriculum, especially the module groups Foundations of Web Science, Major Subject Computer Science und Major Subject Web and Society. Make clear that you know our curriculum and point out why you have chosen our programme above others.

Further information under: http://west.uni-koblenz.de/en/mws/requirements

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Our master’s program appeals to those interested in a more patient-centered approach to helping people achieve and maintain optimal wellness through focus on the whole person, rather than simply their symptoms. Read more
Our master’s program appeals to those interested in a more patient-centered approach to helping people achieve and maintain optimal wellness through focus on the whole person, rather than simply their symptoms.

Highlights:

- Accredited program offered in collaboration with the Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM)
- Rigorous, clinically-applicable curriculum that is continually reviewed and updated with new research and findings
- 100 percent online format with flexible schedule options
- Engaging online learning experience featuring distinguished and dedicated instructors and an expert support network to reinforce clinical and academic skills
- Program satisfies educational requirements to sit for many national nutrition certification exams

Don’t miss your chance to enroll in our spring term!

MISSION

The mission of the UWS master’s in human nutrition and functional medicine (HNFM) program is to prepare learners to serve as outstanding health care clinicians, consultants, educators, administrators and researchers in the field of human nutrition and functional medicine.

PROGRAM

Our clinically-oriented human nutrition and functional medicine program is the only fully accredited master’s degree in functional medicine, having been granted regional accreditation from the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities, the highest level of academic accreditation available in the U.S. This program is 100 percent online as offered as a collaborative endeavor between UWS and the Institute for Functional Medicine (IFM), the organization which founded and developed the key functional medicine concepts used today.

Functional medicine is a science-based, patient-centered and systems-oriented approach to helping people achieve and maintain excellent health. This is accomplished primarily through natural methods, with diet and nutrition as a central focus. It is a forefront model for health care practice that seeks to address the causes of disease and dysfunction rather than suppressing symptoms. Founded on a holistic view of health, functional medicine delves deep into the biochemical and genetic individuality of each patient.

Why choose UWS for a master’s in nutrition?

This program includes advanced instruction in clinical nutrition, similar to other master’s level nutrition programs, but it goes far beyond by also presenting extensive educational content on functional medicine principles and practices derived from the Institute for Functional Medicine. These include important interdisciplinary and evidence-based perspectives, patient assessments and clinical interventions designed to enhance the function of the whole person.

It is primarily a clinically focused degree, with emphasis on treating individual or multiple conditions and their risk factors using dietary and nutritional interventions. Every course contains elements of clinical assessment and diagnosis. There is also a strong focus on wellness promotion and general health in order to meet the clinician’s primary goal of preventing disease and metabolic dysfunction before they occur.

SCHEDULE

The program consists of 50 quarter-credits of graduate coursework (33 semester credits) and can be completed in seven quarters (under two years) if taken at the recommended pace of 7-8 credits (usually two courses) per quarter, though students may move more quickly or more slowly through the program. We recognize that the life situations of our students vary considerably in terms of their family, employment and community commitments, thus we are flexible with regard to speed and prefer that students take the time they need in order to learn the material well.

Additionally, it is possible to take a leave of absence for a quarter or more if needed. As long as the intended schedule is communicated with the registrar, it is possible to extend the program to better suit a student’s individual needs.

Classes are admitted twice per year, with Fall (October) and Spring (April) starts.

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This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. Read more
This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. It aims to prepare students not only for research in archaeological science, but also to further career prospects in all areas of mainstream archaeology. Students normally follow one of three pathways.
-Environmental Archaeology focuses on subsistence and health through studies of animal bones, plant remains and biomarkers in human and non-human hard tissue. It also introduces environmental issues which impact on human beings, including environmental change.
-Landscape Archaeology focuses on understanding and interpreting landscapes in the past using scientific methods.
-Biomolecular Archaeology allows students to specialise in the use of biomolecular methods to study both human remains and artefacts.

The pathways are intended to guide students through appropriate modules; they are indicative rather than prescriptive and students may choose to take the optional modules offered in any combination, subject to timetabling.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/archaeological-sciences-msc-part-time

Why Bradford?

-Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area
-This course includes hands-on experience in the Division's laboratories, a substantial individual research dissertation and has a wide range of option choices
-First destination figures indicate that about 85% of postgraduates in Archaeological Sciences achieve work or further studies in the discipline or cognate areas

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 3 x (C) Modules and 30 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Analytical Methods 1* (10 Credits) (C)
-The Nature of Matter 1 (10 Credits) (C)
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (O)
-GIS: Theory and Practice (10 Credits) (O)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (O)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits) (O)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Analytical Methods 2* (10 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Techniques and Interpretation in Instrumental Analysis (10 Credits) (C)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (C)
-Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits) (O)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Past Environments (20 Credits) (O)
-Site Evaluation Strategies (20 Credits) (O)
-Soils and Chemical Prospection (10 Credits) (O)

End of Semester 2 onwards (60 Credits - 1 x (C) Module):
-Dissertation (MSc) (60 Credits) (C)

* Students must take at least 20 credits from Analytical Methods 1 and 2. These comprise a wide choice of 10 credit modules run as short courses are shared with the MSc Analytical Sciences. These modules are run as short courses.

Semester 1:
-X-Ray Diffraction
-Separation Science
-Vibrational Spectroscopy

Semester 2:
-Mass Spectrometry
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis
-Electron Microscopy

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

The course prepares students not only for research in archaeological science, but also furthers career prospects in mainstream archaeology or scientific analysis. The course is well-suited both to students who wish to use it as a foundation from which to commence research or as vocational training to enhance employment prospects in archaeology.

Career destinations have included PhDs at Universities of York, Bradford, Oxford, Texas A&M, Catamarca; UNESCO research; archaeological project managers; conservation science and teaching.

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This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology. Read more
This course is designed to give graduates a systematic training in the application of modern scientific methods in archaeology. It provides the necessary practical, analytical and interpretative skills to apply a wide range of specialist approaches in archaeology.

It aims to prepare students not only for research in archaeological science, but also to further career prospects in all areas of mainstream archaeology.

Students normally follow one of three pathways.
-Environmental Archaeology focuses on subsistence and health through studies of animal bones, plant remains and biomarkers in human and non-human hard tissue. It also introduces environmental issues which impact on human beings, including environmental change.
-Landscape Archaeology focuses on understanding and interpreting landscapes in the past using scientific methods.
-Biomolecular Archaeology allows students to specialise in the use of biomolecular methods to study both human remains and artefacts.

The pathways are intended to guide students through appropriate modules; they are indicative rather than prescriptive and students may choose to take the optional modules offered in any combination, subject to timetabling.

To find out more about the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/archaeological-sciences-pgdip-part-time

Why Bradford?

-Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area
-This course includes hands-on experience in the Division's laboratories, a substantial individual research dissertation and has a wide range of option choices
-First destination figures indicate that about 85% of postgraduates in Archaeological Sciences achieve work or further studies in the discipline or cognate areas

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 3 x (C) Modules and 30 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Analytical Methods 1* (10 Credits) (C)
-The Nature of Matter 1 (10 Credits) (C)
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (O)
-GIS: Theory and Practice (10 Credits) (O)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (O)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits) (O)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Analytical Methods 2* (10 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Techniques and Interpretation in Instrumental Analysis (10 Credits) (C)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (C)
-Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits) (O)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Past Environments (20 Credits) (O)
-Site Evaluation Strategies (20 Credits) (O)
-Soils and Chemical Prospection (10 Credits) (O)

* Students must take at least 20 credits from Analytical Methods 1 and 2. These comprise a wide choice of 10 credit modules run as short courses are shared with the MSc Analytical Sciences. These modules are run as short courses.

Semester 1:
-X-Ray Diffraction
-Separation Science
-Vibrational Spectroscopy

Semester 2:
-Mass Spectrometry
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis
-Electron Microscopy

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

The course prepares students not only for research in archaeological science, but also furthers career prospects in mainstream archaeology or scientific analysis. The course is well-suited both to students who wish to use it as a foundation from which to commence research or as vocational training to enhance employment prospects in archaeology.

Career destinations have included PhDs at Universities of York, Bradford, Oxford, Texas A&M, Catamarca; UNESCO research; archaeological project managers; conservation science and teaching.

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Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains. Read more
Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains.

This course is taught by staff with extensive crime scene experience who regularly work on a range of operations and are at the forefront of the professional development of the discipline.

The course will:
-Provide you with advanced practical, analytical and interpretative skills in forensic archaeology
-Provide training in discipline skills to enable graduates to pursue careers in Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (CSI)
-Prepare students for careers in non-cognate fields through emphasis on team working and application of a wide knowledge base to problem solving

This course combines approaches from different disciplines to provide students with a comprehensive forensic skill set.

It is essential that forensic archaeologists are able to appreciate their role within a wider police investigation and have a detailed understanding of crime scene management procedures. Forensic Archaeology in the United Kingdom is rapidly developing and recognised as a distinct discipline by the Home Office Forensic Science Regulator. Bradford staff have been actively involved in defining skills matrices for use by the Institute for Archaeologists as part of the process of professional regulation.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/forensic-archaeology-crime-scene-investigation-msc-part-time

Why Bradford?

-The course is underpinned by modules on English Law delivered by University of Bradford School of Law
-The course provides hands-on experience utilising simulated complex, multi-scene crime scene scenarios and is based upon direct case experience by the principal tutors working with UK police forces
-Flexible design means that the MSc award can include either a substantial research dissertation or a period of enhanced professional training
-The course can be studied full-time over 12 months or by flexible study up to 5 years

Modules

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Crime Scene Management (10 Credits)
-English Legal System and Criminal Law for Non-Lawyers (Law 1) (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Anthropology for Crime Scene Investigators (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits)
-Recording Crime Scenes: the use of photographic and survey techniques (10 Credits)

Semester 2 (70 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Research Skills (10 Credits)
-Research and Brief Writing (10 Credits)
-Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (20 Credits)
-Elements of Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits)
-Law of Evidence for Non-Lawyers (Law 2) (10 Credits)

End of Semester 2 onwards (60 Credits - 1 Module):
-Dissertation (MSc) (60 Credits)

The MSc award can be obtained with enhanced professional training (MSc without dissertation) in which case, the following modules are taken instead of the Dissertation:
-Advanced Fieldwork Programme for CSI (30 Credits)
-Independent Research Paper for CSI 1 (10 Credits )
-Independent Research Paper for CSI 2 (20 Credits)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Graduates from this programme have gone on to work in law enforcement (both as Police Officers and Scene of Crime/Scientific Support), Forensic Science as well as commercial archaeology with enhanced skill sets.

Read less
Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains. Read more
Forensic Archaeology is the specialist application of archaeological techniques to the search and recovery of evidential material from crime scenes, often but not always related to buried human remains.

This course is taught by staff with extensive crime scene experience who regularly work on a range of operations and are at the forefront of the professional development of the discipline.

The course will:
-Provide you with advanced practical, analytical and interpretative skills in forensic archaeology
-Provide training in discipline skills to enable graduates to pursue careers in Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (CSI)
-Prepare students for careers in non-cognate fields through emphasis on team working and application of a wide knowledge base to problem solving

This course combines approaches from different disciplines to provide students with a comprehensive forensic skill set.

It is essential that forensic archaeologists are able to appreciate their role within a wider police investigation and have a detailed understanding of crime scene management procedures.

Forensic Archaeology in the United Kingdom is rapidly developing and recognised as a distinct discipline by the Home Office Forensic Science Regulator. Bradford staff have been actively involved in defining skills matrices for use by the Institute for Archaeologists as part of the process of professional regulation.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/forensic-archaeology-crime-scene-investigation-pgdip-part-time

Why Bradford?

-The course is underpinned by modules on English Law delivered by University of Bradford School of Law
-The course provides hands-on experience utilising simulated complex, multi-scene crime scene scenarios and is based upon direct case experience by the principal tutors working with UK police forces
-Flexible design means that the MSc award can include either a substantial research dissertation or a period of enhanced professional training
-The course can be studied full-time over 12 months or by flexible study up to 5 years

Modules

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Crime Scene Management (10 Credits)
-English Legal System and Criminal Law for Non-Lawyers (Law 1) (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Anthropology for Crime Scene Investigators (10 Credits)
-Introduction to Forensic Archaeology (20 Credits)
-Recording Crime Scenes: the use of photographic and survey techniques (10 Credits)

Semester 2 (70 Credits - 5 Modules):
-Research Skills (10 Credits)
-Research and Brief Writing (10 Credits)
-Forensic Archaeology and Crime Scene Investigation (20 Credits)
-Elements of Forensic Taphonomy (20 Credits)
-Law of Evidence for Non-Lawyers (Law 2) (10 Credits)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Graduates from this programme have gone on to work in law enforcement (both as Police Officers and Scene of Crime/Scientific Support), Forensic Science as well as commercial archaeology with enhanced skill sets.

Read less
This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context. It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry. Read more
This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context.

It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry.

The course strongly emphasises the integration of biological and archaeological evidence to address problem-orientated research themes and the application of scientific methods to unravelling the human past.

It provides advanced instruction in the identification and analysis of human remains, the techniques and methods applied to understanding human skeletal morphological variation, and the means by which to assess pathological conditions affecting the skeleton.

The course can be used either as vocational training or, for the MSc, as a foundation from which to commence further research. The course is normally offered on a full-time basis but a part-time route is feasible as well. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/human-osteology-and-palaeopathology-msc-part-time

Professional Accreditation

The course provides access to our world renowned collection of reference material (The Bradford Human Remains Collection), hands-on experience in the School's laboratories, and a substantial individual research dissertation.

A part-time route is feasible, accumulating module credits over a period of study. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option
Semester 1 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules):
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (C)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (C)
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Musculoskeletal Anatomy (20 Credits) (C)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 2 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Palaeopathology (30 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis (10 Credits) (O)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (O)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Career destinations after the MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology have included:
-Lecturers, teaching assistants and post-doctoral researchers at universities in the UK and overseas
-Osteologists and archaeologists working in commercial archaeology
-Research, curatorial and education staff in museums
-Other professional careers

The MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology has also produced a large number of doctoral research students. They have undertaken research in Bradford and at other universities in the UK and overseas, including Ireland, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand, the USA and Canada.

Read less
This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context. It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry. Read more
This course emphasises the study of archaeological human remains within their funerary context.

It builds upon the School's extensive research in human osteology and palaeopathology and related research expertise in field archaeology, archaeozoology, molecular archaeology and archaeological biogeochemistry.

The course strongly emphasises the integration of biological and archaeological evidence to address problem-orientated research themes and the application of scientific methods to unravelling the human past.

It provides advanced instruction in the identification and analysis of human remains, the techniques and methods applied to understanding human skeletal morphological variation, and the means by which to assess pathological conditions affecting the skeleton.

The course can be used either as vocational training or, for the MSc, as a foundation from which to commence further research. The course is normally offered on a full-time basis but a part-time route is feasible as well. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

Professional Accreditation

-The course provides access to our world renowned collection of reference material (The Bradford Human Remains Collection), hands-on experience in the School's laboratories, and a substantial individual research dissertation.
-A part-time route is feasible, accumulating module credits over a period of study. Individual modules are available to candidates wishing to enhance their specialist knowledge in a particular area.

For more information on the part time version of this course, please view this web-page: http://www.brad.ac.uk/study/courses/info/human-osteology-and-palaeopathology-pgdip-part-time

Modules

(C) = Core, (O) = Option

Semester 1 (60 Credits - 4 x (C) Modules):
-Analysis of Human Remains (20 Credits) (C)
-Archaeozoology (10 Credits) (C)
-Quantitative Methods (10 Credits) (C)
-Musculoskeletal Anatomy (20 Credits) (C)

Semester 2 (60 Credits - 2 x (C) Modules and 20 Credits from the (O) Modules listed):
-Palaeopathology (30 Credits) (C)
-Research Skills (10 Credits) (C)
-Funerary Archaeology (10 Credits) (O)
-Stable Light Isotope Analysis (10 Credits) (O)
-Topics in Archaeometry (10 Credits) (O)

Career support and prospects

The University is committed to helping students develop and enhance employability and this is an integral part of many programmes. Specialist support is available throughout the course from Career and Employability Services including help to find part-time work while studying, placements, vacation work and graduate vacancies. Students are encouraged to access this support at an early stage and to use the extensive resources on the Careers website.

Discussing options with specialist advisers helps to clarify plans through exploring options and refining skills of job-hunting. In most of our programmes there is direct input by Career Development Advisers into the curriculum or through specially arranged workshops.

Career destinations after the MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology have included:
-Lecturers, teaching assistants and post-doctoral researchers at universities in the UK and overseas
-Osteologists and archaeologists working in commercial archaeology
-Research, curatorial and education staff in museums
-Other professional careers

The MSc Human Osteology and Palaeopathology has also produced a large number of doctoral research students. They have undertaken research in Bradford and at other universities in the UK and overseas, including Ireland, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand, the USA and Canada.

Read less
The UIW Master of Arts with a major in Fashion Design allows students to prepare for careers in both industry and academia. The mainstream practice has been to emphasize academic careers. Read more
The UIW Master of Arts with a major in Fashion Design allows students to prepare for careers in both industry and academia. The mainstream practice has been to emphasize academic careers. The proposed program is different in that both industry and academia will receive equal emphasis and the focus of courses in the curriculum will be to learn new skills while refining skills already acquired.

The master program with a major in Fashion Design is unique in the incorporation of teaching methodologies into each class and stressing the importance of the skills necessary in the fashion industry. Students in the master’s program will learn how to teach each of the courses that they are taking to complete their degree and further develop techniques learned in their undergraduate courses. No other master’s program provides graduate students with directive on how to teach the subject matter. This will give graduates of the master’s program a unique advantage, whether entering academia or industry.

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The Public Economics, Law and Politics programme at the Leuphana Graduate School unites disciplines that have traditionally examined the relationship between state, society and the economy. Read more
The Public Economics, Law and Politics programme at the Leuphana Graduate School unites disciplines that have traditionally examined the relationship between state, society and the economy. Questions, problems and solutions that ensue from this complex network of relations will be analyzed from the perspective of political science, economics, and law. The causes, the contexts and the social and economic effect of state action stand at the center of this programme. We aim to provide an academically grounded, yet interdisciplinary, account of how politics, law and the economy interact.

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The Master's degree in Sustainability Studies offers an academically grounded education in sustainable development research. Read more
The Master's degree in Sustainability Studies offers an academically grounded education in sustainable development research. Our goal is to provide the theoretical, methodological, organisational and communicative skills needed to conceive, implement and critically reflect upon the interdisciplinary projects and research that define sustainability studies. In addition, the degree programme aims to train students to become agents for change in the economic, scientific, political and civil organisations, so that they can promote, manage and evaluate how these organisations make a transition toward sustainable policies.

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