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Why you should choose this course. -You're looking for a course offering an-depth study of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics. Read more
Why you should choose this course:
-You're looking for a course offering an-depth study of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics
-You want to learn in state-of-the-art facilities, including our £2.5 million electroacoustic studio complex
-You want to pursue a career as a composer working with technology and audio-media, or a PhD in electroacoustic composition

Course description

This course provides an in-depth knowledge of cutting-edge compositional techniques, methodologies and associated aesthetics in creative work that intersects with technology and other artistic or scientific forms. It serves as excellent preparation for a career as a composer working with technology and audio-media, and it provides all the training necessary for embarking on and envisioning novel strands for a PhD in electroacoustic composition, including those informed by other scientific and arts form.

All teaching, research and compositional work is carried out in the NOVARS Research Centre for Electroacoustic Composition, Performance and Sound Art with its state-of-the-art £2.5 million electroacoustic studios. Opportunities for the performance of new works are offered using the 55-loudspeaker sound diffusion system of MANTIS (Manchester Theatre in Sound) and through events such as the Locativeaudio Festival (locativeaudio.org) and Sines and Squares Festival for Analogue Electronics and Modular Synthesis (sines-squares.org). Acousmatic, mixed, live electronic and multimedia works are all possible, with composers able to incorporate the spatialisation of sound and interactive new game-audio media into the presentation of their work.

In addition to the final portfolio, all electroacoustic music and interactive media composition students take the compulsory course unit Composition Project and the further compulsory taught course unit, Fixed Media and Interactive Music . Optional course units normally include Aesthetics and Analysis of Organised Sound, Interactive Tools and Engines, Contemporary Music Studies, Advanced Orchestration, and Historical or Contemporary Performance. There are also choices outside the MusM Composition (subject to course director approval), such as Computer Vision, Mobile Systems, Mobile Communications, Ethno/Musicology in Action: Fieldwork and Ethnography , and Work Placement (Institute of Cultural Practices).

Aims

This programme aims to:
-Build on undergraduate studies, developing skills in electroacoustic composition to Master's level.
-Increase knowledge and a systematic understanding of electroacoustic music.
-Foster the particular creative talents of each individual student.
-Provide all the training necessary for embarking on a PhD in electroacoustic composition.
-Prepare students for a career as a composer and in the wider music industry where critical judgement and developed powers of communication are needed.

Special features

The NOVARS studio complex supports a broad range of activities in the fields of electroacoustic composition and new media. The studios incorporate the newest generation of Apple computers, Genelec, PMC and ATC monitoring (up to 37-channel studios) and state-of-the art licensed software (including Pro Tools HD, Max MSP, GRM Tools, Waves, Ircam's Audiosculpt and Reaper and, for Interactive Media work, Oculus Rift, Unreal Engine 4, Unity Pro and open-source Blender3D). Location and performance work is also supported by a new 64-channel diffusion system.

Postgraduate students at the NOVARS Research Centre play an active role in the planning, organisation and execution of performance events such as the Sines & Squares Festival and MANTIS Festival (over 20 editions since 2004), and projects such as LocativeAudio and our regular Matinée presentations. Relevant training, including rigging and de-rigging the MANTIS system, health and safety, sound diffusion workshops, organisation of Calls for Works when needed, etc., is an important part of the course.

Career opportunities

Graduates of this programme have pursued successful careers in musical and non-musical fields. Some continue to further study via a PhD before securing an academic position. Some go on to teach in schools or further education, both in the UK and overseas. Other areas of work for which advanced compositional training has been directly relevant include recording studios, entrepreneurships, the creative industries, music publishing, music journalism and performance. Careers outside of music have included computer programming, theatre, accountancy, law, social work and human resources.

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Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). Read more
Palaeopathology is the study of past disease in human remains; it is a sub-discipline of bioarchaeology (study of human remains from archaeological sites). This lecture, seminar and laboratory based MSc equips students with the theoretical and practical skills knowledge of how to study and interpret data collected from human remains. The emphasis is on health and well-being using a multidisciplinary approach, linking biological evidence for disease with cultural data (the bioarchaeological approach). This course is unique in the world and it takes a holistic view of disease, as seen in a clinical contexts today, and prepares students for undertaking significant research projects in this subject, or working in contract archaeology, and many other fields. It is aimed at graduates mainly in archaeology and anthropology with or without past experience of knowledge in this field, and for those who aspire to continue into a PhD programme or work in contract archaeology. However, past students have come from a variety of subject backgrounds, and destination data illustrate a wide range of employments take these students.

Course Structure

Two taught modules in the Epiphany term (Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science and Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton), and two taught modules in Michaelmas term (Palaeopathology: Theory and Method; Themes in Palaeopathology), with the double module dissertation over Easter term and the summer (submitted early September).

Core Modules

-Research and Study Skills in Archaeological Science
-Identification and Analysis of the Normal Human Skeleton
-Palaeopathology: Theory and Method
-Themes in Palaeopathology
-Dissertation (double module)

Learning and Teaching

The programme is mainly delivered through a mixture of lectures, seminars and practical classes. Typically lectures provide key information on a particular area, and identify the main areas for discussion and debate in bioarchaeology. Seminars then provide opportunities for smaller groups of students to discuss and debate particular issues or areas, based on the knowledge that they have gained through their lectures and through independent study outside the programme’s formal contact hours. Finally, practical laboratory classes allow students to gain direct practical skills in the recording and interpretation of data from skeletal remains. The latter provide an important element of the programme in allowing independent and group work, as well as hands-on experience under laboratory conditions, essential for a potential future working environment.

The balance of these types of activities changes over the course of the programme, as students develop their knowledge and ability as independent learners, giving them the opportunity to engage in research, professional practice, and developing and demonstrating research skills in a particular area of the subject.

In Term 1 students typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Outside timetabled contact hours, students are also expected to undertake their own independent study to prepare for their classes and broaden their subject knowledge. External speakers specializing in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

In Term 2 the balance shifts from learning the basic skills required for recording and interpreting skeletal data (age at death, sex, normal variation), to further developing skills for palaeopathological data recording and their interpretation and understanding the limitations. In addition, the Themes module aims to develop in students a critical approach to the evaluation of multiple forms of evidence, beyond that for human remains, for the reconstruction of specific themes. It focuses on discussion and debate of different related issues. In Term 2 students typically attend 4 hours a week of lectures and 2.5 hours of laboratory sessions, in addition to seminars over the term. Again, external speakers specializing in specific subject areas from “industry” and academia are brought in to engage the students on issues in research, but also in the profession.

The move towards greater emphasis on independent learning and research continues in Term 3 and beyond, where the research skills acquired earlier in the programme are developed through the dissertation research project. Under the supervision of a member of academic staff with whom they will typically have three one-to-one supervisory meetings, students undertake a detailed study of a particular area, resulting in a significant piece of independent research. The dissertation is regarded as a preparation for further professional or academic work. In Term 3 students are given the opportunity to attend a Careers Session in the Department where past graduates of the course talk about their career trajectories since graduating.

Throughout the programme, all students have access to an “academic adviser”, or in the case of this MSc the two Directors (Professor Charlotte Roberts and Dr Rebecca Gowland), who provide them with academic support and guidance. Typically a student meets their adviser two to three times a year, in addition to which all members of teaching staff have weekly office hours when they are available to meet with students on a ‘drop-in’ basis. The department also has an exciting programme of weekly one hour research seminars which postgraduate students are strongly encouraged to attend. Additionally, the students who attend the MSc Palaeopathology course are provided with the opportunity to attend journal paper critique sessions each term, and human bioarchaeology seminars given by PhD students.

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The Department of Archaeology and History of Art offers a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of archaeology, the history of art and visual culture, cultural heritage management, and museum studies by employing the most recent theoretical and methodological approaches and a hands-on approach to learning. Read more
The Department of Archaeology and History of Art offers a multi-disciplinary approach to the study of archaeology, the history of art and visual culture, cultural heritage management, and museum studies by employing the most recent theoretical and methodological approaches and a hands-on approach to learning. Our faculty consists of specialists in the archaeology and history of art of the civilizations that have flourished in the area of modern Turkey. Students will learn about prehistoric Anatolian archaeology, the Greek and Roman eras, Late Antique and Byzantine studies, and the Ottoman period, and can decide to focus more specifically on one of these time periods. Cultural heritage management practices and museum operations are inseparable from the study of archaeology and the history of art, and students will also be instructed in these areas during their four-year undergraduate program. Students in our department have the opportunity to take courses in ancient languages of the Mediterranean and Anatolian worlds such as Greek, Latin, and Ottoman Turkish. Our lectures are enriched through field trips to archaeological sites and museum excursions, and participation in conferences and workshops organized by visiting lecturers and specialists from Turkey and abroad. We provide hands-on training in methods of analysis and conservation in our archaeological laboratory. Our students are also encouraged to participate in one of our archaeological excavation projects during the summer or to complete internships with museums or cultural heritage organizations.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Archaeology: Archaeology of the Neolitic, Chalcolithic, Bronze or Iron Ages.
• Hellenistic and Roman Art, architecture and archeology.
• Late Antique and Byzantine Art, architecture and archeology.
• Museum studies and cultural heritape management.

Entry Requirements

1. GPA: 2.5 minimum

2. GRE (foreign students) score with the following minimum scores.
GRE: 149 (new exam format), or 610 (older exam format), the minimum scores refer only to the quantitative section

3. English proficiency exam. Applicants need to have taken one of the following exams and have at least the minimum score listed below. Native English speakers do not need to take an English exam.
TOEFL: Paper based (550/4), IBT (80/120)
IELTS: 6.5

4. Statement of purpose: In addition to telling us about your academic background, try to be as specific as possible about which topics you would like to study and research while at Koç University.

5. Two letters of recommendation
Two recommendation letters are required for M.A. applications.

6.Writing Sample
The writing sample should be at least eight pages and could be a research paper or an article. We would prefer the writing sample to be in English, but if your previous academic training has been in another language, we can accept a sample in another language.

7. Interviews
A short list of candidates will be invited for an interview, either in person or through Skype.

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The Department of Psychology aims at producing theoretical and applied research, scholarship, and teaching at a quality that meets and even exceeds the national and international academic standards and at addressing issues that are relevant to national and human development. Read more
The Department of Psychology aims at producing theoretical and applied research, scholarship, and teaching at a quality that meets and even exceeds the national and international academic standards and at addressing issues that are relevant to national and human development. The Department seeks active participation of the students in such research projects, to help them gain first-hand experience in conducting research and to familiarize them with issues that are of concern to human development.
The department expects the students to gain knowledge in almost all fields of psychology and to be aware of different approaches to psychology. The interests of the faculty include a wide range of areas such as cognitive, social, cross-cultural, organizational, developmental psychology, and psychology of language. Students get a chance to actively participate in national and international research projects that are conducted by our faculty. The department also regularly invites leading national and international scholars in psychology to introduce students to the field at large.

Current faculty projects and research interests:

• Culture and Self
• Social Development
• Industrial and Organizational Psychology
• Social Psychology
• Social Cognition
• Attitudes, Persuasion and Social Influence
• Social Development
• Cognitive Development
• Cognitive Models and Theories
• Human Memory
• Conditioning and Learning
• Neural Bases of Memory
• Cognitive Neuroscience
• Science, Technology, and Society
• Gender Inequalities
• Crime and Deviance
• Language development
• Program evaluation
• Prevention
• Positive youth development

Entry Requirements

1. GPA: 2.5 minimum

2. GRE (foreign students) score with the following minimum scores.
GRE: 149 Quantitative section

3. English proficiency exam. Applicants need to have taken one of the following exams and have at least the minimum score listed below. Native English speakers do not need to take an English exam.
TOEFL IBT (80/120)
IELTS: 6.5

4. Statement of purpose: In addition to telling us about your academic background, try to be as specific as possible about which topics you would like to study and research while at Koç University.

5. Two letters of recommendation
Two recommendation letters are required for M.A. applications.

6. Interviews
A short list of candidates will be invited for an interview, either in person or through Skype.

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Studying International Management at EBC Hochschule means for you. - to study business in English in one of the world’s strongest economies. Read more
Studying International Management at EBC Hochschule means for you:

- to study business in English in one of the world’s strongest economies
- to learn how the practitioners do it – each professor was or still is in a leading position in the business world
- to learn in a professional yet personal environment
- the chance to gain extensive international experience by studying one or two semesters at one of our partner universities with a double-degree option
- to have a broad range of specialization opportunities to customize your professional profile

MODULES

Compulsory: International Management & Business Law (I + II)// International Management III// International Business Control// Corporate Finance// Global Supply Chain Management// Customer Management// Strategic Marketing// Sales Management

Electives: HR-Management// HR-Development// Organizational Change// Executive Office & Start-Up Management// Innovation & Service Management// New Media Management

Skill Development: Advanced Skills (I + II + III)// Leadership Assessment// Business Summer School// Company Training or Research Project// Leadership Development

http://www.ebc-hochschule.de/fileadmin/EBC_Daten/Studium/Curriculum/ebc-hochschule-master-ibm.pdf

PROSPECTS

German degrees are recognized all over the world for their academic and professional quality.

We prepare you to work for:

- global players
- small and medium sized companies with a strong focus on export
- international offices of German companies
- consulting companies

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS

Please hand in


completed application form including attachments
tabular résumé
attested proof of higher education entrance qualification
attested proof and certificate of first academic degree (Bachelor’s, Diplom, Master’s etc.) with a final grade of at least good (2.5 on a German grading scale); in the case of the minimum score not having been achieved, a letter of recommendation from a university is required highlighting the student’s particular eligibility for the Master’s degree course.
in the case of a university degree obtained in another country: appropriate documents in German or English (translated where necessary by an officially recognized translation service)
proof of the necessary business relevance of former obtained degree
proof of proficiency in English, in the case of non-native speakers at the language competency levels of B2 (TOEFL 87 p.; Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English: FCE; TOIEC 605 p.; IELTS 6 p. or other internationally recognized proof of a CERFL level B2)
Send them via email to international-admissionsebc-hochschule.de and to uni-assist.

Uni assist controls the legitimacy of your documents and your eligibility to enter the German higher education system. This process takes about six weeks. Since we want to speed up things, we will do a fast pre-check of your documents and proceed already with the application process.

If you have successfully completed your Bachelor’s degree or Diplom at a university with a background in economic science you do not need any additional business administration qualifications for admission. Rather you will be admitted to the Master’s degree course following the selection process. If you only have a limited business administration foundation or none at all, you will be required to furnish proof thereof before beginning the course of studies.

There are no additional special requirements in terms of prior education. The Master’s degree course is open equally to applicants with professional experience.

Given that the pre-check is positive, we will invite you to our “EBC entrance assessment”.

EBC Hochschule determines a student’s aptitude for the course in question via a selection process, in particular by a personal interview in which the applicant's motivation and suitability are assessed. If it is not possible for you to interview in person, we will arrange an interview via Skype extra for you.

NTT DATA and Michel Page International cooperate with us on the programme

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The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Read more
The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Embedded with the program is the Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) credential recommendation made to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) that is required for employment as a California school counselor within school districts.

Graduates of Alliant’s School Counseling master’s program will be prepared to work as school counselors in elementary and secondary school settings. School counselors serve as student advocates and counseling support, working with other professionals within the school (teachers, school psychologists, school nurses, etc.) to create positive learning environments that maximize students’ success.

School counselors design and implement counseling programs that help to equip students to better manage emotions and behaviors, make decisions, cope with challenges, prevent and resolve conflicts, overcome learning disorders, and improve attendance. School counselors also assist students in improving self-management skills, and provide guidance toward helping students achieve future goals through appropriate career and academic counseling.

Who Should Apply?

Successful candidates for the School Counseling master's program may have degrees, experience, and backgrounds in a variety of areas, including: counseling, psychology, sociology, education, child development, liberal students, teaching, social work, and more.

Program Overview

39 units of coursework + 10 units of field placement.
Full program completion within 2-2.5 years.
100 school counseling practicum hours required.
600 hours of supervised field placement in school counseling required. Candidates are responsible for securing a field placement with support and guidance from Alliant.
Late afternoon and evening classes for working adults.
Low-student-to-faculty ratio/small class sizes.
No GRE requirement.
No prerequisites.

Locations

Six California locations: San Diego, Los Angeles, Irvine, San Francisco, Fresno and Sacramento

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The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Read more
The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Embedded with the program is the Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) credential recommendation made to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) that is required for employment as a California school counselor within school districts.

Graduates of Alliant’s School Counseling master’s program will be prepared to work as school counselors in elementary and secondary school settings. School counselors serve as student advocates and counseling support, working with other professionals within the school (teachers, school psychologists, school nurses, etc.) to create positive learning environments that maximize students’ success.

School counselors design and implement counseling programs that help to equip students to better manage emotions and behaviors, make decisions, cope with challenges, prevent and resolve conflicts, overcome learning disorders, and improve attendance. School counselors also assist students in improving self-management skills, and provide guidance toward helping students achieve future goals through appropriate career and academic counseling.

Who Should Apply?

Successful candidates for the School Counseling master's program may have degrees, experience, and backgrounds in a variety of areas, including: counseling, psychology, sociology, education, child development, liberal students, teaching, social work, and more.

Program Overview

39 units of coursework + 10 units of field placement.
Full program completion within 2-2.5 years.
100 school counseling practicum hours required.
600 hours of supervised field placement in school counseling required. Candidates are responsible for securing a field placement with support and guidance from Alliant.
Late afternoon and evening classes for working adults.
Low-student-to-faculty ratio/small class sizes.
No GRE requirement.
No prerequisites.

Locations

Six California locations: San Diego, Los Angeles, Irvine, San Francisco, Fresno and Sacramento

Read less
The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Read more
The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Embedded with the program is the Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) credential recommendation made to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) that is required for employment as a California school counselor within school districts.

Graduates of Alliant’s School Counseling master’s program will be prepared to work as school counselors in elementary and secondary school settings. School counselors serve as student advocates and counseling support, working with other professionals within the school (teachers, school psychologists, school nurses, etc.) to create positive learning environments that maximize students’ success.

School counselors design and implement counseling programs that help to equip students to better manage emotions and behaviors, make decisions, cope with challenges, prevent and resolve conflicts, overcome learning disorders, and improve attendance. School counselors also assist students in improving self-management skills, and provide guidance toward helping students achieve future goals through appropriate career and academic counseling.

Who Should Apply?

Successful candidates for the School Counseling master's program may have degrees, experience, and backgrounds in a variety of areas, including: counseling, psychology, sociology, education, child development, liberal students, teaching, social work, and more.

Program Overview

39 units of coursework + 10 units of field placement.
Full program completion within 2-2.5 years.
100 school counseling practicum hours required.
600 hours of supervised field placement in school counseling required. Candidates are responsible for securing a field placement with support and guidance from Alliant.
Late afternoon and evening classes for working adults.
Low-student-to-faculty ratio/small class sizes.
No GRE requirement.
No prerequisites.

Locations

Six California locations: San Diego, Los Angeles, Irvine, San Francisco, Fresno and Sacramento

Read less
The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Read more
The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Embedded with the program is the Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) credential recommendation made to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) that is required for employment as a California school counselor within school districts.

Graduates of Alliant’s School Counseling master’s program will be prepared to work as school counselors in elementary and secondary school settings. School counselors serve as student advocates and counseling support, working with other professionals within the school (teachers, school psychologists, school nurses, etc.) to create positive learning environments that maximize students’ success.

School counselors design and implement counseling programs that help to equip students to better manage emotions and behaviors, make decisions, cope with challenges, prevent and resolve conflicts, overcome learning disorders, and improve attendance. School counselors also assist students in improving self-management skills, and provide guidance toward helping students achieve future goals through appropriate career and academic counseling.

Who Should Apply?

Successful candidates for the School Counseling master's program may have degrees, experience, and backgrounds in a variety of areas, including: counseling, psychology, sociology, education, child development, liberal students, teaching, social work, and more.

Program Overview

39 units of coursework + 10 units of field placement.
Full program completion within 2-2.5 years.
100 school counseling practicum hours required.
600 hours of supervised field placement in school counseling required. Candidates are responsible for securing a field placement with support and guidance from Alliant.
Late afternoon and evening classes for working adults.
Low-student-to-faculty ratio/small class sizes.
No GRE requirement.
No prerequisites.

Locations

Six California locations: San Diego, Los Angeles, Irvine, San Francisco, Fresno and Sacramento

Read less
The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Read more
The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Embedded with the program is the Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) credential recommendation made to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) that is required for employment as a California school counselor within school districts.

Graduates of Alliant’s School Counseling master’s program will be prepared to work as school counselors in elementary and secondary school settings. School counselors serve as student advocates and counseling support, working with other professionals within the school (teachers, school psychologists, school nurses, etc.) to create positive learning environments that maximize students’ success.

School counselors design and implement counseling programs that help to equip students to better manage emotions and behaviors, make decisions, cope with challenges, prevent and resolve conflicts, overcome learning disorders, and improve attendance. School counselors also assist students in improving self-management skills, and provide guidance toward helping students achieve future goals through appropriate career and academic counseling.

Who Should Apply?

Successful candidates for the School Counseling master's program may have degrees, experience, and backgrounds in a variety of areas, including: counseling, psychology, sociology, education, child development, liberal students, teaching, social work, and more.

Program Overview

39 units of coursework + 10 units of field placement.
Full program completion within 2-2.5 years.
100 school counseling practicum hours required.
600 hours of supervised field placement in school counseling required. Candidates are responsible for securing a field placement with support and guidance from Alliant.
Late afternoon and evening classes for working adults.
Low-student-to-faculty ratio/small class sizes.
No GRE requirement.
No prerequisites.

Locations

Six California locations: San Diego, Los Angeles, Irvine, San Francisco, Fresno and Sacramento

Read less
The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Read more
The master's degree program in School Counseling is for candidates who wish to pursue a school counseling career working with children and adolescents in pre-K-12 schools. Embedded with the program is the Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) credential recommendation made to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) that is required for employment as a California school counselor within school districts.

Graduates of Alliant’s School Counseling master’s program will be prepared to work as school counselors in elementary and secondary school settings. School counselors serve as student advocates and counseling support, working with other professionals within the school (teachers, school psychologists, school nurses, etc.) to create positive learning environments that maximize students’ success.

School counselors design and implement counseling programs that help to equip students to better manage emotions and behaviors, make decisions, cope with challenges, prevent and resolve conflicts, overcome learning disorders, and improve attendance. School counselors also assist students in improving self-management skills, and provide guidance toward helping students achieve future goals through appropriate career and academic counseling.

Who Should Apply?

Successful candidates for the School Counseling master's program may have degrees, experience, and backgrounds in a variety of areas, including: counseling, psychology, sociology, education, child development, liberal students, teaching, social work, and more.

Program Overview

39 units of coursework + 10 units of field placement.
Full program completion within 2-2.5 years.
100 school counseling practicum hours required.
600 hours of supervised field placement in school counseling required. Candidates are responsible for securing a field placement with support and guidance from Alliant.
Late afternoon and evening classes for working adults.
Low-student-to-faculty ratio/small class sizes.
No GRE requirement.
No prerequisites.

Locations

Six California locations: San Diego, Los Angeles, Irvine, San Francisco, Fresno and Sacramento

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In a world constantly in flux there’s a greater need for more coherent, sustainable cities. You’ll gain advanced understanding of how architecture can engage with and improve our changing world. Read more
In a world constantly in flux there’s a greater need for more coherent, sustainable cities. You’ll gain advanced understanding of how architecture can engage with and improve our changing world. Hone your skills, knowledge and thinking to RIBA and ARB Part 2 level. Test your work in the public domain through live projects. Explore architecture as a tool to create more sustainable, inclusive and resilient places. Immersed in our design studio, we’ll help you become the architect you aspire to be.

Key features

Get creative with our amazing facilities and resources. You’ll be based in our eye-catching Faculty of Arts building in the heart of the campus, with students and staff from other art courses to bounce ideas off and collaborate with. And, you’ll have 2.5 square metres of desk to call your own.

Study a programme fully validated by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and prescribed by the Architects Registration Board (ARB) – with National Student Survey results consistently above 90 per cent satisfaction.

Interact with the public domain with architecture that’s responsive to people, places and tectonics. Work with local communities and institutions, including city councils, business organisations and non-governmental organisations.

Choose one of the few programmes of this kind to be assessed by 100 per cent coursework – no exams.

Work on live studio-based projects, both in the UK and abroad. Previous projects have been based in the UK, Spain, Portugal, Latvia and Poland.
Benefit from our future-facing programme that features a strong urban and sustainability dimension.

Learn from tutors with industry experience and interdisciplinary research interests. Our school was described as ‘charged’ by Architects’ Journal.

Find employment after graduating from our programme. Over 95 per cent of our recent graduates have found work in the UK, the Middle East and Australia – with award-winning architects such as Allies and Morrison, Feilden Clegg Bradley, Hopkins, John McAslan, Keith Williams, Make, Nicholas Hare and Walters and Cohen.

Course details

In your first year, you’ll undertake design studio projects set around live UK or overseas urban regeneration projects. You’ll study your core subjects this year – exploring key theories and tools through philosophies of sustainability; considering urban design praxis through urban methodologies; and deepening your understanding of professional practice through professional studies.

In your final year, you’ll have a more flexible timetable. You’ll combine the skills and knowledge you've developed in the design studio with the individual study of an area of your choice. Your design studio projects this year are set around live urban regeneration projects overseas or in the UK. And for your individual study topic, you’ll be able to choose from a selection of modules grounded in current research activity in the School of Architecture, Design and Environment.

How to apply

The University aims to make the application procedure as simple and efficient as possible. Our Postgraduate Admissions and Enquiries team are on hand to offer help and can put you in touch with the appropriate faculty if you wish to discuss any programme in detail. If you have a disability and would like further information about the support provided by Plymouth University, please visit our Disability Assist Services website. Support is also available to overseas students applying to the University from our International Office via our how to apply webpage or email .

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The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas for research degrees. In addition to the particular research interests of each member of staff, we have a number of postgraduate students undertaking research of contemporary social and political relevance in Britain and Europe. Read more
The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas for research degrees.

In addition to the particular research interests of each member of staff, we have a number of postgraduate students undertaking research of contemporary social and political relevance in Britain and Europe. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-anthropology/

Current students are engaged in research projects covering a broad range of subjects, located in Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East.

How do I choose between MRes and MPhil?

Normally research students register for the MRes in order to complete the requisite training for carrying out a doctoral research project. You then transfer to MPhil status after completing your MRes dissertation in September (or in your second year if you are part-time).

However, if you already have a substantial background, it is possible to register directly for the full-time MPhil, provided the Department and your future supervisor(s) agree. MPhil-registered students do exactly the same research training as MRes students, but they present a student dissertation in May, in order to fast-track to fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Whether you start registered as MRes or MPhil, upgrading to PhD status takes place at a later date.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Prof Sophie Day.

First year
In the week before the beginning of the academic year in mid-September there is an Induction Programme for all new research postgraduates at Goldsmiths. You will be introduced to College and Departmental facilities and procedures, and attend workshops on what is involved in doing a research degree.

For the first year you are normally registered for the MRes. It is a training year, in which work on your own research project is coupled with general training in Anthropological and Social Science Methods - run both within the Department and by the Goldsmiths College Research Office - as follows:

Methods in Anthropological Research (20 weeks x 2 hrs)
Research Design (20 weeks x 2.5 hrs)
Quantitative Methods in Social Science
Department of Anthropology Research Seminar

You may also take other modules depending on your specific training needs, such as learning a language, or auditing an MA course, either in the Department or elsewhere, of particular relevance to your research project. You are also encouraged to attend seminars in other parts of the University of London, attend conferences, and go on outside modules such as those organised by GAPP (Group for Anthropology in Policy and Practice). There are Departmental funds to enable you to attend such events.

At the end of the first year, MRes students present a 15,000-word dissertation in September, which discusses in depth their proposed research topic and the relevant literature. Students registered for the MPhil present a 10,000-word dissertation in May. You need formal approval from the Department before you can start your fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Fieldwork and writing up your thesis

Whether you are doing fieldwork down the road or data collection on the other side of the world, it is important that you submit regular reports to your supervisor/s. At the end of the data-collection period when you return to the Department, you join the Writing-Up seminar, which meets weekly to discuss students' draft chapters.

Some time after you return from data-collection (after about 8 months for full-time students, and 16 months for part-time students) you are required to present a detailed thesis outline and 2 draft chapters for consideration by your Advisory Committee. Students normally upgrade to PhD status at this point.

Thesis

An MPhil thesis should be completed within 3 years (full-time) or 4 years (part-time). Some students move between full-time and part-time modes. For example, they may do their training on a part-time basis and then seek funding for a year's full-time fieldwork, reverting once more to part-time mode for the writing-up period. We are happy to encourage such flexibility.

Department

Anthropology at Goldsmiths is ranked 6th in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas at MPhil level. http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-anthropology/. Read more
The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas at MPhil level.

http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/mphil-phd-visual-anthropology/

The MPhil in Visual Anthropology can be achieved through two main strands:

research projects that centre on the study of visual cultures, such as various forms of media representation or art
the use of specific visual methodologies as a central feature of the research project itself

The programme focuses on the visual as a vital and defining factor in the research project as a whole.

Additional practical training can be provided, alongside some access to department audio-visual equipment and facilities, but we generally expect MPhil candidates to have an appropriate level of practical visual production skills and to be largely self-sufficient in this area.

MPhil students are currently carrying out visual projects in Mexico, India, Argentina, Lebanon, Israel, and the UK.

How to choose between MRes and MPhil

Normally research students register for the MRes in order to complete the requisite training for carrying out a doctoral research project. You then transfer to MPhil status after completing your MRes dissertation in September (or in your second year if you are part-time).

However, if you already have a substantial background, it is possible to register directly for the full-time MPhil, provided the Department and your future supervisor(s) agree. MPhil-registered students do exactly the same research training as MRes students, but they present a student dissertation in May, in order to fast-track to fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

This programme offers the opportunity for you to continue your research to a PhD.

Contact the department

If you have specific questions about the degree, contact Prof Sophie Day.

Structure

First year
In the first year, the emphasis of the visual anthropology training is on key themes and issues within the sub-field, particularly in relation to your own work. You develop your own research project over the year through the production of several small-scale visual projects. Guidance and feedback on visual and academic work will be provided in the weekly visual practice seminars and through supervision meetings.

In the week before the beginning of the academic year in mid-September there is an Induction Programme for all new research postgraduates at Goldsmiths. You will be introduced to College and Departmental facilities and procedures, and attend workshops on what is involved in doing a research degree.

For the first year you are normally registered for the MRes. It is a training year, in which work on your own research project is coupled with general training in Anthropological and Social Science Methods - run both within the Department and by the Goldsmiths College Research Office - as follows:

Methods in Anthropological Research (20 weeks x 2 hrs)
Research Design (20 weeks x 2.5 hrs)
Quantitative Methods in Social Science
Department of Anthropology Research Seminar

You may also take other modules depending on your specific training needs, such as learning a language, or auditing an MA course, either in the Department or elsewhere, of particular relevance to your research project. You are also encouraged to attend seminars in other parts of the University of London, attend conferences, and go on outside modules such as those organised by GAPP (Group for Anthropology in Policy and Practice). There are Departmental funds to enable you to attend such events.

MPhil students present a 10,000-word dissertation in May. You need formal approval from the Department before you can start your fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Fieldwork and writing up your thesis

Whether you are doing fieldwork down the road or data collection on the other side of the world, it is important that you submit regular reports to your supervisor/s. At the end of the data-collection period when you return to the Department, you join the Writing-Up seminar, which meets weekly to discuss students' draft chapters.

Some time after you return from data-collection (after about 8 months for full-time students, and 16 months for part-time students) you are required to present a detailed thesis outline and 2 draft chapters for consideration by your Advisory Committee. Students normally upgrade to PhD status at this point. An MPhil thesis should be completed within 3 years (full-time) or 4 years (part-time). Some students move between full-time and part-time modes. For example, they may do their training on a part-time basis and then seek funding for a year's full-time fieldwork, reverting once more to part-time mode for the writing-up period. We are happy to encourage such flexibility.

Assessment

Thesis (including film or photographic portfolio) and viva voce.

Department

Anthropology at Goldsmiths is ranked 6th in the UK for the quality of our research**

**Research Excellence Framework 2014, Times Higher Education research intensity subject rankings

Investigate a variety of fascinating areas that have real relevance to modern life.

As a department we’re interested in pushing the discipline forward. We’re known for pioneering new fields including visual anthropology and the anthropology of modernity. And we tackle other contemporary issues like urban planning, development, emotions and aesthetics, and new social movements.

Skills & Careers

Our students have taken up academic posts in anthropology as well as related fields all over the world; some have joined NGOs or GOs and taken employment as researchers, teachers and in broadcasting.

How to apply

Before you apply for a research programme, we advise you to get in touch with the programme contact, listed above. It may also be possible to arrange an advisory meeting.

Before you start at Goldsmiths, the actual topic of your research has to be agreed with your proposed supervisor, who will be a member of staff active in your general field of research. The choice of topic may be influenced by the current research in the department or the requirements of an external funding body.

If you wish to study on a part-time basis, you should also indicate how many hours a week you intend to devote to research, whether this will be at evenings or weekends, and for how many hours each day.

Research proposals

Along with your application and academic reference, you should also upload a research proposal at the point of application.

This should be in the form of a 2-5 page statement of the proposed area of research and should include:

delineation of the research topic
why it has been chosen
an initial hypothesis (if applicable)
a brief list of major secondary sources

Funding

Please visit http://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/ for details.

Read less
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Help meet the ever growing need for cardiologists with an in-depth knowledge of Sports Cardiology in areas such as; the drive for a healthier lifestyle, the growing population of amateur athletes, with 2.5 million marathon runs per year in Europe, alone; and the commitment of sporting organisations to pre-participation screening.

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Highlights

- Taught by world leading experts in Sports Cardiology
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A formal MSc degree in sports cardiology conferred by a well established and well published academic institution will set you apart from potential competition and will provide you with unique employment opportunities within national health systems, sporting organisations and charitable organisations dedicated to sport and prevention of sudden cardiac death.

For more information visit sgul.ac.uk/sportscardiology

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