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About the course. Explore the most advanced studio techniques, technologies and processes at the forefront of current music production. Read more

About the course

  • Explore the most advanced studio techniques, technologies and processes at the forefront of current music production.
  • Discover advanced compositional devices and strategy applicable to DAW-based realisation of original material.
  • Unleash your creative potential and cultivate your own individual style to produce original works that stand out from the crowd in their artistic and technical sophistication.
  • Survey the most exciting aesthetic trends in current music-making with technology, and their relation to the demands of the music industry.

Why choose this course?

The MA Creative Music Production is aimed at applicants specifically interested in applying studio technologies and production skills to the creation of their own original music (as opposed to “producing” other artists’ music). In addition to equipping students with solid bases in studio technology, processes and practices, the course addresses the purely formal, artistic and aesthetic aspects of music-making, and the specific compositional devices and strategy applicable to DAW-based realisations of original material.

By surveying the defining traits and aesthetic concerns of a number of popular genres centred on electronic composition-production, students develop a sophisticated awareness of current artistic and aesthetic trends, and an enhanced knowledge of the musicology of production. On this course, you will develop a portfolio of original works showcasing your talent as a composer-producer, opening up a wide range of possibilities for your professional career.

Course content

Taught sessions will typically cover the following topics:

  • Studio Technology, processes and practices
  • Audio production and design
  • Compositional strategies in DAW environments
  • Musical form, structure and discourse in Electronica
  • Rhythm and kinesis in EDM
  • Experimentation in IDM
  • Noise in Techno
  • Timbre and texture in Ambient music
  • Machine aesthetics in House music
  • Sampling and re-contextualisation in Hip-Hop
  • Lo-fi aesthetics and Glitch
  • Retro-revivalism - analogue sound in the digital age

Resources

  • A large recording studio featuring the high-end SSL AWS 900+ SE mixing desk / Protools HD system and Quested and JBL monitoring (2.0, 2.1 and 5.1).
  • A medium-size studio featuring an Avid C24 / Protools HD system with RedNET and Neumann 5.1 monitoring.
  • 4 x iMac control/edit spaces with Slate Raven Mti touchscreen control and RedNET.
  • 2 x live recording booth/spaces.
  • 3 monitoring spaces for surround sound mixing.
  • a dubbing suite for A/V work (foley, ADR, etc.)
  • 2 x 30 seat dual-monitor Apple iMac labs.
  • A 150-seats state-of-the-art performance venue with Soundcraft vi1 console and full RedNET integration.
  • Top class outboard including Digidesign Pro Tools, Lexicon TLAudio, TC Electronic, Focusrite, and more.
  • Vast selection of top-quality dynamic, condenser and ribbon microphones, including Soundfield, Neumann, AKG, Coles, Shure, Audio-Technica, Beyerdynamic.

Careers

Graduates from this award will be equipped with a wide range of specialist knowledge and skills in the field of music technology and music creation – from purely technical to creative and intellectual. As such, they will be ideally positioned to pursue a career in the music and media industries, creating their own musical content for production music library, film/TV synch, or commercial release. You may, in addition, consider positions in music publishing, music journalism and criticism, or teaching, or you may continue your higher education at doctoral level.

Teaching methods

Lecture, seminars and tutorials are typically scheduled over two consecutive days a week, plus some extra sessions for particular workshops, performance, recording, as necessary. In addition to scheduled sessions, students are expected to engage in continuous self-directed study and studio practice.

Staff team

The MA Creative Music Production is led by Bruce Aisher.  Bruce is a music producer, songwriter, composer, remixer, sound designer and technology journalist whose work is to be found on over 100 commercially released tracks (including a US Billboard Club Chart No.1) on TV programmes such as ‘CSI’ ‘Numb3rs’ and 'Top Gear' and products by Apple, Clavia and Native Instruments.

Industry links

Our industry partners include:

  • BAFTA
  • Splash Damage Videogame Company
  • Videofeet Media Company
  • Focusrite
  • SampleMagic
  • Dynamic Music
  • Extreme Music (Sony)
  • Grand Chapel Studios
  • iZotope
  • SSL

Entry requirements

A good (1st, 2.1 or 2.2) BMus/BSc/BA in Music / Music Technology (or equivalent qualification), or 5 years professional industry experience at the discretion of the admissions or programme tutor. Evidence of solid compositional work with technology prior to undertaking the course is required (determined by the submission of a small portfolio of original compositions with the student’s application).

All international students are required to demonstrate suitable levels of English language competence. This can be through previous study in English, but we often require specific performance in English tests. All undergraduates must be able to prove a minimum of IELTS 6.5 with at least 5.5 in every component or equivalent.

Fees and Funding

Fees for 2018/19 are still to be confirmed for home students.

International Students

Full time: £12,500 for the 2018 academic year

Part time: If you decide to study this course on a part time basis you will be charged £1040 per 15 credits for the 2018 academic year

*Tuition fees are charged annually. The fees quoted above are for the specified year(s) only. Fees may be higher in future years, for both new and continuing students. Please see the University’s Fees and Finance Policy (and in particular the section headed “When tuition fees change”), for further information about when and by how much the University may increase its fees for future years.

How to apply

For more information about our new MA in Creative Music Production, please contact Bruce Aisher on



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The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is the largest professional training course for Clinical Psychologists in the United Kingdom, and welcomes high-calibre candidates from the UK and abroad. Read more
The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is the largest professional training course for Clinical Psychologists in the United Kingdom, and welcomes high-calibre candidates from the UK and abroad. The course provides a first-rate training in clinical psychology, leading to a doctoral qualification accredited by the UK’s Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and the British Psychological Society (BPS). The Course’s overarching aim is to train independently minded, scientifically-oriented and compassionate clinicians capable of taking a leadership role in health services at home or abroad.

The UCL Course is at the forefront of many of the national and local developments and innovations which impact on the profession, and many members of staff are closely involved in NHS planning at both national and local level. We aim to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills they need to become effective clinical practitioners in a rapidly changing NHS. The Course has an explicitly pluralistic ethos and exposes trainees to a variety of approaches. It also encourages practice that demonstrates an awareness of equal opportunities and a sensitivity to the multi-cultural contexts routinely encountered in clinical work in London.

The course is three years in length and consists of a mixture of taught lectures, seminars and workshops running alongside a series of 6 placements based in clinical services in and around London. The academic programme is delivered by a highly experienced team of clinical psychologists, many of whom are world-leaders in their academic and clinical fields. The clinical placements provide trainees with opportunities to develop their skills under experienced supervision in a wide variety of contexts, using a broad range of models, and with a wide spectrum of clients.

As a course that is based in one of the world’s top research-intensive universities, UCL trainees have the opportunity to conduct high-quality research under the supervision of leading scientists in the field.

Core Purpose and Philosophy of the Course http://www.ucl.ac.uk/dclinpsy/docs/app_docs/core_purpose_and_philosophy

Applying to the Course

The course welcomes applications from interested candidates from the UK and EU. International candidates apply directly to UCL. Further details can be found on the following webpage: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/dclinpsy/international/

For details of the application process for UK and EU candidates, please choose from the options below.

At present trainees are full-time employees of the health service, and their University fees are paid directly by the NHS. Although there is a possibility that these arrangement may not apply to candidates entering programmes in 2017, this is unclear. As such, candidates should not be deterred from making applications.

This message will be updated as soon as more information is forthcoming.

The closing date for for receipt of applications for courses starting in Autumn 2017 is 1pm on 30th November 2016.

Further Entry Requirements

The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is a 3-year full-time programme which entitles graduates to apply for registration as a Clinical Psychologist with the Health Professions Council and as a Chartered Clinical Psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Candidates need to meet some basic academic criteria. After that, they also need to demonstrate (by gaining some relevant clinical experience) that they have some awareness of the roles undertaken by clinical psychologists, are familiar with the sorts of clients psychologists see, and have an idea of the contexts within which psychologists work. In addition, they need to show that they have the appropriate personal characteristics needed to work effectively with a wide range of potentially vulnerable individuals, and to contribute to the work of fellow professionals in the NHS or equivalent organisations.


Candidates who have not achieved a good 2.1 may need to think carefully about whether it makes sense to pursue a training in Clinical Psychology, since it is unlikely that they will be offered a place on a Doctoral Course. However, we recognise that sometimes degrees under-represent someone's academic ability - for example, illness or major life-events may have meant that there were periods when it was hard to maintain a good standard of work. If this is the case applicants need to offer clear evidence of their academic capacity in their application. This evidence must be supported by an academic referee who has monitored the candidate's work and can clearly demonstrate that certain academic achievements results underestimate the applicant's academic abilities.

Candidates with a 2.2 will not usually be accepted on the course unless there is unequivocal evidence of subsequent academic achievement equivalent to a good 2.1. In practice this means obtaining a higher degree, but the type of degree needs to be thought about carefully. Some Masters degrees will not offer enough academic challenge, making it hard for an academic referee to make the unequivocal judgment about a student's ability that a course needs. The more academically demanding a course, the more likely it is that they will be able to do this.

Graduate basis for chartered membership
In order to be considered for a place on any training course in Clinical Psychology it is essential to have Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC)with the British Psychological Society (BPS), usually at the time of applying or certainly by the time shortlisting is completed (in February). Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership is the same as Graduate Basis for Registration: all that has changed is the name. So if you previously had GBR you will now have GBC. The usual way of obtaining this is by completing an undergraduate degree in Psychology, or by taking a qualifying exam or programme which confers eligibility.

Not all Psychology programmes confer eligibility for GBC. If you are unsure whether you are entitled to GBC you should check this with your programme staff or write to the BPS (St Andrews House, 48 Princess Road East , Leicester LE1 7DR; Tel: 0116 254 9568; e-mail: ) for more details.


Relevant clinical experience
In order to have a realistic chance of being selected it is essential to gain some relevant clinical experience before applying to the course. There are several reasons for this. It gives applicants a chance to test out whether work in this field is for them - it is much better to discover this before making a major career commitment. It also means that courses know that candidates' applications are realistic, and gives them an idea of how applicants have responded to the clinical work they have undertaken. Many trainees find that they make good use of their pre-training experience during training, so it is not 'wasted' time.

We know that asking for relevant experience causes people to think twice about applying for Clinical Psychology course. It means that there is a gap between completing an undergraduate degree and starting training, with no guarantee of getting on a course. This presents a real challenge to many people, not least a financial one. There is also a risk - widely recognised by courses - that potential applicants feel themselves obliged to work for a number of years in the hope of gaining enough experience to be taken onto a course. We know that most people work for around 1-2 years before getting on a course, and in most cases this should be sufficient.

Being clear about what counts as experience is hard to specify, especially because suitable posts vary enormously. As above, and very broadly, candidates should look for experience which gives them:

. an idea of what clinical psychologists actually do
. some direct clinical contact with the sort of clients psychologists work with
. an idea of what work with clients actually entails
. a sense of the organisational context in which clinical psychology usually operates

One common route is to find work as an Assistant Psychologist. These posts are advertised in the BPS Bulletin (distributed monthly to all members of the BPS) and also (although less frequently) in other relevant publications - for example, the health section of papers such as The Guardian.

As assistant posts are in relatively short supply, it is important to emphasise that they are not the only route to gaining relevant experience. For this reason applicants should think broadly about the possible options open to them. For example, employment in a social work context or as a nursing assistant in a psychiatric unit, or as a worker in a MIND Day Centre would be extremely valuable; all would count as relevant experience. Another route is to take a post as a research assistant, though the research should usually offer at least some direct involvement in a clinical area. It is worth remembering that a very "academic" research post would not give candidates much of a sense of how the clinical world operates, or how they react to the sorts of clients seen in clinical contexts.

There is something of a myth that applicants need to build an extensive 'portfolio' of experience, with more than one client group, and with a mixture of research and clinical experience. Speaking at least for selectors at UCL, we are not looking for this. We are looking for people whose posts map onto the bullet-pointed criteria just above, and who can show (and reflect on) the benefits of this experience in the way they present themselves. Basically it is the quality of experience - and what the person makes of it - that is as important as the quantity of experience.

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Biofilms consists of a microbial community within an extracellular matrix and, in this form, they allow bacteria to colonise otherwise hostile environments. Read more

Biofilms consists of a microbial community within an extracellular matrix and, in this form, they allow bacteria to colonise otherwise hostile environments. Biofilms represent a challenge to a number of sectors, including industry (e.g. food and drink) and medicine/public health. This is partly due to the difference in behaviour of bacteria within a biofilm compared to free-living cells, including resistance to biocides and antibiotics. It is known that bacteriophages (phages; viruses that specifically attack bacteria resulting in bacterial cell lysis and death) are capable of infecting bacteria within the biofilm. Due to bacterial genus, species and strain specificity, phages therefore offer the potential for targeted ‘knock-out’ of a species of interest in a multispecies community thereby facilitating development of our understanding of biofilm development, and also offering the potential for development of a targeted strategy to destroy biofilms.

Dental plaque is a mixed-species biofilm in which oral streptococci play a pivotal role. The complex nature and diversity of these biofilms makes it difficult to identify the specific contributors to disease outcomes (e.g. dental caries). The goal of our research is therefore to determine the impact of phages on oral streptococci in a mixed-species oral biofilm and, in so doing, develop phages as a tool to both understand and control oral biofilm development. This is significant given the prevalence of dental decay amongst adults and pre-school children, and the increasing evidence that biofilms leading to dental caries can negatively impact on systemic health in adults.

The specific aim of this MRes will be the isolation and characterization of phages infecting oral streptococci from saliva and dental plaque, followed by preliminary analysis of the impact on biofilm development.

The project will be in collaboration with the Edinburgh Dental Institute and will include Dr Jennie Foley (Senior Clinical Lecturer/consultant) as a supervisor.

Academic qualifications

A first degree (at least a 2.1) ideally in Microbiology or in biology with a good fundamental knowledge of microbiology.

English language requirement

IELTS score must be at least 6.5 (with not less than 6.0 in each of the four components). Other, equivalent qualifications will be accepted. Full details of the University’s policy are available online

Essential attributes:

• Experience of fundamental microbiology laboratory techniques including routine culturing of bacteria and basic molecular biology techniques of DNA isolation and PCR 

• Competent in data analysis and MS Office

• Knowledge of molecular biology

• Good written and oral communication skills

• Strong motivation, with evidence of independent research skills relevant to the project

• Good time management

Desirable attributes:

Bioinformatics

Funding Notes

This is a fees-only studentship and a stipend is not included. Edinburgh Napier University’s School of Applied Sciences will pay for the UK fees for a full time Masters by research (MRes) degree for 12 months and the associated laboratory and reagent costs. Non-UK/EU residents are eligible to apply but must cover the difference between the UK/EU and overseas tuition fees.



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Do you want to become a capable, articulate teacher who can inspire children to combine designing and practical skills with in-depth knowledge and understanding? If so, our PGCE in Secondary Design and Technology (Food, Textiles and Product Design) is for you. Read more

Do you want to become a capable, articulate teacher who can inspire children to combine designing and practical skills with in-depth knowledge and understanding? If so, our PGCE in Secondary Design and Technology (Food, Textiles and Product Design) is for you.

What's covered in the course?

We believe that Design and Technology is an essential and exciting subject that allows pupils to be innovative and creative when taught by inspiring and motivational teachers like you. We’ll enable you to become the committed, confident and creative teacher you want to be with the skills you need share your passion for your subject.

Assignments and school-centred activities are structured around the development of your School Experience Progress Journal (SEPJ) which demonstrates your progress against the nationally agreed competences (the Teachers’ Standards), which all teachers must meet throughout their career. A system of continuous review and assessment of progress in the SEPJ will support your growing ability to take responsibility for your own development. 

After interview you may be advised you need to take a funded Subject Knowledge Enhancement (SKE) course before you start your PGCE.

Why Choose Us?

  • You’ll learn in an environment that offers top quality facilities, including specialist learning spaces for food, textiles and product design.
  • If you have a minimum of a 2.1 in your undergraduate degree, or a Master’s or PhD, in a subject area relevant for teaching Design & Technology, you may be eligible for a bursary from the National College for Teaching and Learning (NCTL). For 2017 entry this bursary is £9,000 if you have a 2:1 or Master's, or £12,000 if you have a First or PhD.
  • At least 120 days across a minimum of two placements, in line with (NCTL requirements, supported by a subject mentor in your school and a personal development tutor at the University.
  • We’re proud of our high employability rates, with 100 per cent of students in employment or further study six months after completing this course for the last five years in a row! (DLHE survey reports 2011/12 - 2015/16).
  • 100 per cent of our 2015 graduates said we prepared them ‘well’ or ‘very well’ for employment (latest DLHE survey 2014/15).
  • If you accept an offer from us you’ll be able to take part in our free Skills Test ‘bootcamps’ to make sure you’re ready to start your PGCE in September.
  • You'll gain Master's level credits gained as part of this course that you can then use towards a full Master's degree, such as our Master’s in Teaching and Learning or Educational Leadership.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

You will need to have a good degree (minimum 2:2 but 2:1 or 1st preferred) from a UK higher education institution or equivalent, at least 50 per cent of which is in a food or textiles-related subject.

You must have a GCSE grade C or above (or equivalent) in both English language and mathematics prior to application and if you are offered an interview you will take a written test to assess your standard of English.

There is an expectation that you will have had some general experience of working with secondary age students in a school setting. In preparation for the selection interview you are required to engage in a teaching episode, observed by an experienced qualified teacher.

As part of the selection procedure, the interview panel will expect you to demonstrate your knowledge of design and technology and will also assess personal qualities such as the potential to relate well to secondary age students, enthusiasm, sensitivity, communication skills and robustness and resilience for teaching.

Applicants must also meet The National College for Teaching and Leadership requirements for Initial Teacher Training, which means being medically fit and successfully completing an enhanced disclosure via the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS).

ASSESSMENT

Modules are assessed through a range of directed tasks and targeted assignments. Trainee teachers are also required to complete a profile of evidence towards the achievement of the standards required by the National College for Teaching and Leadership for the award of Qualified Teacher Status (QTS). Evidence is verified by mentors.

HOW DO I APPLY?

All applications need to be made via the UCAS Teacher Training website.

Course code: 33RM



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Our Initial Teacher Education course in Religious Education received the top grade in all areas in the last Ofsted subject inspection. Read more

Our Initial Teacher Education course in Religious Education received the top grade in all areas in the last Ofsted subject inspection. The course tries to develop a deep understanding of issues and complexities which surround the teaching and learning of religious education, religious studies and philosophy education. We wish to develop you as a thinking teacher who can be aware of a variety of effective ways to teach Religious Education and make informed decisions about how you work with students. 

Find out more about the Beyond the Ordinary national campaign which highlights the benefits of a career in teaching religious education. There is also a bursary of £9,000 currently available for those with a 1st degree/Phd and £4,000 for those with a 2.1 degree/Master's. 

At the University of Birmingham we believe we should provide student teachers with the highest level of teacher training possible, and this is why we offer a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDipEd) rather than a Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE). Both qualifications lead to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) but the PGDipEd also offers the equivalent of 120 credits at Master’s level (out of 180), which makes it a highly rewarding course by combining both theory and practice.

Following satisfactory completion of this course, plus a successful induction year in school and references, you can return to complete an MA in Teaching Studies (data collection and a 15,000 word dissertation). Additionally, the School also offers a number of specialised Professional Development programmes which will enable you to further develop your career.

Course details

The School of Education at the University of Birmingham has a long tradition of delivering teaching training courses. Its teaching has been graded as 'outstanding' for the third consecutive time by Ofsted inspectors which reaffirms the University’s status as one of the UK’s leading institutions for excellence in teacher training. 

The Initial Teacher Education course

The PGDipEd course lasts 36 weeks, of which 24 are spent in our partnership schools.

Teaching practice will take several forms: school placements and also team teaching while at the University. You will also get involved in small scale research projects for your assignments so that you can evaluate the theory in practice and integrate this learning into your own teaching.

The course will not pretend that teaching Religious Education is straightforward, because it is not! Our sessions will rarely be of the form of a lecture, instead we use activities and discussion as the main way of working.

We will help you become aware of issues relating to planning lessons, assessment, the difference between telling students information and teaching students, how to provide learning experiences which meet the needs of students with different learning styles, how different approaches to teaching a topic can change the learning experience for students, how choice of teaching methods, resources and technology can change the sort of religious education with which students engage. Along the way we will, of course, also introduce you to the National Framework and local agreed syllabuses for religious education and you will have some opportunities to experience religion at first hand!

You will also get an opportunity to plan, resource and delivering a 6th form conference at the university of Birmingham for over 100 Year 12 and 13 pupils from local schools. This is a unique opportunity and experience and ensures you will leave your training year not only fully equipped to plan, resource and teach A Level but also with the skills of team work, planning for diversity and inclusion and the skills of conference management.

Religious Education students who successfully complete their PGDipED year are eligible to apply for the MA in Teaching Studies once they have completed their NQT year of teaching and within 5 years of passing the PGDipED. The MA in Teaching and Learning is part-time and you study for this alongside your teaching role in school.

Those students who qualified through the University of Birmingham in the PgDipEd (QTS) Religious Education can take advantage of a generous grant scheme run by Culham St Gabriel’s Trust called 3ForRE which enables alumni to undertake the masters qualification in an affordable, manageable way. It is a unique scheme based on a three-way partnership between RE Teachers, schools and Culham St Gabriel’s Trust. Culham St Gabriel’s will currently pay up to £1500 per year of fees for those University of Birmingham PGDipED Religious Education alumni who undertake a dissertation on an RE theme and are accepted onto the MA Teaching Studies programme following a successful NQT year.

Employability

Many local schools have a high regard for Birmingham Religious Education PGDipEd (QTS) students and we have an excellent record of students gaining jobs at the end of the course. For 2013-14, 93% of graduates obtained a post in teaching (with the remaining 7% undertaking further study or choosing to acquire employment outside of teaching). Many of our ex-students are now Heads of Departments in our partnership schools. 



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Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterised by chronic inflammation of the Gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Studies have shown activation of hypoxia-inducible pathways can promote the resolution of inflammatory disease. Read more

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterised by chronic inflammation of the Gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Studies have shown activation of hypoxia-inducible pathways can promote the resolution of inflammatory disease. This occurs, in part, through regulation of autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress/unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways, and potentially, their co-ordinated action. Not surprisingly, there is considerable interest in harnessing hypoxia-inducible pathways for potential IBD therapies; however this can only be achieved once we fully understand the biological mechanisms.

This clinically-relevant project would look to examine the functional effects of hypoxia on IBD using an in vitro model of IBD and a range of techniques, including mammalian cell culture, immunoblotting and qPCR, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry. In particular, it would focus on the importance of UPR and autophagic pathways and how they functionally intersect to resolve hypoxia-induced inflammation in IBD. This model and the research data generated from its will ultimately advance our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms contributing to IBD.

A first degree (at least a 2.1) ideally in biomedical sciences or equivalent discipline with a good fundamental knowledge of cell biology and molecular biology associated techniques.

English language requirement

IELTS score must be at least 6.5 (with not less than 6.0 in each of the four components). Other, equivalent qualifications will be accepted. Full details of the University’s policy are available online.

Essential attributes:

• Experience of fundamental GLP, record keeping, troubleshooting, data handling and presentation skills

• Competent in basic laboratory skills

• Knowledge of cell biology and analytical techniques

• Good written and oral communication skills

• Strong motivation, with evidence of independent research skills relevant to the project

• Good time management

Desirable attributes:

Prior laboratory experience in mammalian cell culture and molecular biology is desirable



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Wild birds have been postulated as sentinels, reservoirs, and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. They are known to forage at various pollution sources such as waste water treatment plants, landfill sites and at hospitals and domestic waste sites. Read more

Wild birds have been postulated as sentinels, reservoirs, and potential spreaders of antibiotic resistance. They are known to forage at various pollution sources such as waste water treatment plants, landfill sites and at hospitals and domestic waste sites. In addition, wild birds have the potential to spread antibiotic resistance over long distances through migration. This project will investigate the prevalence of antibiotic resistant E.coli in different species of wild birds near various pollution sites. E.coli resistance levels will be quantified and strain and resistance characteristics will be determined using phenotypic and molecular techniques.

Academic qualifications

A first degree (at least a 2.1) ideally in Biology/Microbiology with a good fundamental knowledge of techniques used to study microorganisms.

English language requirement

IELTS score must be at least 6.5 (with not less than 6.0 in each of the four components). Other, equivalent qualifications will be accepted. Full details of the University’s policy are available online.

Essential attributes:

• Experience of fundamental microbiology practical skills

• Competent in data analysis, MS Office

• Knowledge of molecular biology

• Good written and oral communication skills

• Strong motivation, with evidence of independent research skills relevant to the project

• Good time management

Desirable attributes:

Good statistical skills, bioinformatics



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Introduction. MA 3D Computer Animation is a practice-led course that explores both the theory and practice of digital 3D animation in film, television, games and interactive applications. Read more

Introduction

MA 3D Computer Animation is a practice-led course that explores both the theory and practice of digital 3D animation in film, television, games and interactive applications. With new and emerging technologies changing how we make, understand and experience animation, you'll be encouraged to push boundaries and explore the practices of animation from a variety of critical and professional perspectives.

Content

In an era of unparalleled opportunities for skilled visual players and sequential image-makers, you will create, explore and play with 3D digital technologies and develop a specialist personal practice. The animation industry is rapidly evolving, with new developments in real-time animation and immersive digital world-building.

During the course, you’ll create 3D computer animation sequences and assets, both individually and as part of creative teams comprising students from different media disciplines. 

Structure

The course is delivered across four terms, starting in September and finishing in December the year after. Incorporating a summer break, this is a one-year full-time course (45 taught weeks), delivered over 15 months. 

Term 1

1.1 3D Computer Animation Fundamentals (40 Credits)

1.2 Design for Animation, Narrative Structures and Film Language (20 Credits)

Terms 2 and 3

2.1 Advanced and Experimental 3D Computer Animation Techniques (40 Credits)

2.2 Collaborative Unit (20 Credits)

Term 4

3.1 Final Major Project and Thesis (60 Credits)



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Introduction. Read more

Introduction

MA Virtual Reality (VR) explores both the practical and theoretical implications of emerging virtual reality technologies. The course will help to position you at the forefront of setting narratives and developing a critical language of how virtual reality can be applied across a vast range of media products.

Content

MA Virtual Reality will equip you with the technical resources and specialist guidance needed to test and develop virtual experiences across a range of media platforms including 3D computer animation, 360-degree filmmaking, games and interactive AR applications.

You’ll experiment with new approaches to the use of these technologies, as well as explore the design and conceptualisation pipeline for these virtual experiences.

Structure

The course is delivered across four terms, starting in September and finishing in December the year after. Incorporating a summer break, this is a one-year full-time course (45 taught weeks), delivered over 15 months. 

Term 1

1.1 Creative VR Project Portfolio (40 Credits)

1.2 Designing Immersive Experiences (20 Credits)

Terms 2 and 3

2.1 Critical Practice and Exploration (40 Credits)

2.2 Collaborative Unit (20 Credits)

Term 4

3.1 Final Major Project and Thesis (60 Credits)



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Introduction. MA Visual Effects (VFX) at London College of Communication is a practice-led course that will develop your technical computing skills, animation, lighting and editing capabilities. Read more

Introduction

MA Visual Effects (VFX) at London College of Communication is a practice-led course that will develop your technical computing skills, animation, lighting and editing capabilities. The course culminates in a collaborative project that will prepare you for integrated roles within the VFX industry.

Content

MA Visual Effects (VFX) at LCC is taught as a specialist subject within the broad and experimental visual practice of animated visual communication. The course explores the theoretical and historical contexts that inform how audiences perceive reality and photorealism.

You'll be introduced to a range of technical and conceptual approaches to VFX animation. You’ll also explore technologies and processes by producing short-form animation across the VFX spectrum, to set briefs. 

Structure

The course is delivered across four terms, starting in September and finishing in December the year after. Incorporating a summer break, this is a one-year full-time course (45 taught weeks), delivered over 15 months. 

Term 1

1.1 VFX Animation Fundamentals (40 Credits)

1.2 Design for Animation, Narrative Structures and Film Language (20 Credits)

Terms 2 and 3

2.1 Advanced and Experimental VFX Animation Techniques (40 Credits)

2.2 Collaborative Unit (20 Credits)

Term 4

3.1 Final Major Project VFX and Thesis (60 Credits)



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Plant endophytic bacteria such as. Pseudomonas fluorescens. offer an untapped resource of new antibiotics and other bioactive molecules. Read more

Plant endophytic bacteria such as Pseudomonas fluorescens offer an untapped resource of new antibiotics and other bioactive molecules. We have identified a number of such bacterial strains that have activity against important plant diseases and parasites such as the nematode Meloidogynejavanica (root-knot disease of many plant species) and the pathogenic fungus Pyrenophora teres (Barley leaf spot disease). We have sequenced the genomes of three such strains (Moreira et al 2016) and identified a number of chromosomal regions with novel potential secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways. The first task of the project is to analyse these in detail using bioinformatics to compare with other pathways and to identify targets for gene inactivation. To demonstrate the potential role these pathways may have in killing M. javanica and P. teres we will use a targeted gene inactivation technique (perfected in our labs) to generate knock-out mutations in the key gene(s) involved in the synthesis of the bioactive products. In parallel, we will undertake an analysis of the metabolites produced by both the wild type strains and these mutants using HPLC, LCMS and GCMS with a view to identification of the pathway encoded bioactive compounds. Wild Type, mutant strains and extracts will be tested for activity against M. javanica and P. teres using bioassays developed in our labs. As time permits plant protection experiments in a plant growth room and greenhouse will also be undertaken. This project will be designed as a PhD programme with an international collaborative dimension.

Further information

These projects are funded under the President’s Research Fellowship Programme of the Institute, with the college fees and research materials and consumables covered. A small student stipend will also be provided. The successful candidates will work in the enviroCORE, which is the Institute’s environmental research centre, in a team of research supervisors and postgraduate students.

Applicants should have a primary honours degree (Level 8) in an appropriate discipline (Biosciences, Microbiology, Genetics, Biology, Bioinformatics, Zoology, Environmental Science etc.). They must also hold a minimum of a Second Class Honours Grade 1 (2.1) undergraduate degree. The successful candidates are expected start in the postgraduate positions no later than September 2018.

To apply for a President’s Research Fellowship Scholarship, please email with the title(s) of the project being applied for, a CV and a statement (c.500 words) as to why this project is of interest to you. If applying for more than one research project, please list them in your order of preference.

Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2018



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Carotenoids (i.e. lutein [L], zeaxanthin [Z] and meso-zeaxanthin [MZ]) exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and optical properties that are believed to support human health and function. Read more

Carotenoids (i.e. lutein [L], zeaxanthin [Z] and meso-zeaxanthin [MZ]) exhibit anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and optical properties that are believed to support human health and function. These and other nutrients are present in livestock i.e. chicken, pork and beef. The presence and concentration of such nutrients can be used to assess the health of the animals and assess the conditions that animals were exposed to during farming. FAME analysis by GC would identify higher levels of unsaturated fatty acids in meat products (Unsaturated fatty acids are known to have an adverse impact on human health). Also, the protein level and amino acid composition can be characterised, to identify proline and phenylalanine concentrations which also have implications in human health. In combination, these analytical techniques could be used to assess the impact of environmental factors on animal health, and the nutritional benefits of eating higher quality products can be determined. This analysis would be able to identify the quality of agricultural products and/or environments and their potential impact on animal health and the health of the consumer.

Further information

These projects are funded under the President’s Research Fellowship Programme of the Institute, with the college fees and research materials and consumables covered. A small student stipend will also be provided. The successful candidates will work in the enviroCORE, which is the Institute’s environmental research centre, in a team of research supervisors and postgraduate students.

Applicants should have a primary honours degree (Level 8) in an appropriate discipline (Biosciences, Microbiology, Genetics, Biology, Bioinformatics, Zoology, Environmental Science etc.). They must also hold a minimum of a Second Class Honours Grade 1 (2.1) undergraduate degree. The successful candidates are expected start in the postgraduate positions no later than September 2018.

To apply for a President’s Research Fellowship Scholarship, please email with the title(s) of the project being applied for, a CV and a statement (c.500 words) as to why this project is of interest to you. If applying for more than one research project, please list them in your order of preference.

Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2018



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This project will set out to assess the distribution and extent of damage caused by an emerging pest in Irish bean crops. the Bruchid beetle. Read more

This project will set out to assess the distribution and extent of damage caused by an emerging pest in Irish bean crops: the Bruchid beetle. It will also aim to monitor resistance emergence in a number of key pests for growers with resistance detected already in Europe including; pea & bean weevil (legumes), pollen beetle (OSR), cabbage stem flea beetle (OSR) and western flower thrips (strawberries).

Further information

These projects are funded under the President’s Research Fellowship Programme of the Institute, with the college fees and research materials and consumables covered. A small student stipend will also be provided. The successful candidates will work in the enviroCORE, which is the Institute’s environmental research centre, in a team of research supervisors and postgraduate students.

Applicants should have a primary honours degree (Level 8) in an appropriate discipline (Biosciences, Microbiology, Genetics, Biology, Bioinformatics, Zoology, Environmental Science etc.). They must also hold a minimum of a Second Class Honours Grade 1 (2.1) undergraduate degree. The successful candidates are expected start in the postgraduate positions no later than September 2018.

To apply for a President’s Research Fellowship Scholarship, please email with the title(s) of the project being applied for, a CV and a statement (c.500 words) as to why this project is of interest to you. If applying for more than one research project, please list them in your order of preference.

Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2018



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Oats are very well suited to Ireland’s climate and there is currently a renewed interest in oats as a result of a growing appreciation of the nutritional and health benefits of oat grains. Read more

Oats are very well suited to Ireland’s climate and there is currently a renewed interest in oats as a result of a growing appreciation of the nutritional and health benefits of oat grains. This project will aim to (a) quantify potassium cycling through the oat crop growing season, (b) understand the mechanics of potassium cycling, and (c) optimise the nutritional agronomy of the oat crop. It is expected that this research will

  1. Expand our understanding of this important crop
  2. Enable the nutritional agronomy of the crop to be optimised
  3. Help form a firm basis for the Irish Oat industry to expand the production of this important functional food which is so beneficial to the human diet.

Further information

These projects are funded under the President’s Research Fellowship Programme of the Institute, with the college fees and research materials and consumables covered. A small student stipend will also be provided. The successful candidates will work in the enviroCORE, which is the Institute’s environmental research centre, in a team of research supervisors and postgraduate students.

Applicants should have a primary honours degree (Level 8) in an appropriate discipline (Biosciences, Microbiology, Genetics, Biology, Bioinformatics, Zoology, Environmental Science etc.). They must also hold a minimum of a Second Class Honours Grade 1 (2.1) undergraduate degree. The successful candidates are expected start in the postgraduate positions no later than September 2018.

To apply for a President’s Research Fellowship Scholarship, please email with the title(s) of the project being applied for, a CV and a statement (c.500 words) as to why this project is of interest to you. If applying for more than one research project, please list them in your order of preference.

Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2018



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Novel formulations of bioplastics will be generated in this project with different characteristics of the ones reported in literature. Read more

Novel formulations of bioplastics will be generated in this project with different characteristics of the ones reported in literature. These novel bioplastics can have special interest as more ecologically friendly packaging materials with a low production cost. Moreover, the test results could inform as to the suitability of the materials for other applications such as surface treatment technologies, or encapsulation of bacteria or pharmaceuticals. Specifically, the project will set out to:

  1. Formulate organic bioplastics with incorporation of alternative marine collagen arising from waste products of the fish and shellfish industries.
  2. Characterise the marine bioplastics with physicochemical approaches and evaluation of their potential degradation and durability.
  3. Assess the biosafety and biodegradation of the marine bioplastics in the soil and sea/freshwater.
  4. Evaluate the deterioration of food stuffs using the novel marine bioplastics.

Further information

These projects are funded under the President’s Research Fellowship Programme of the Institute, with the college fees and research materials and consumables covered. A small student stipend will also be provided. The successful candidates will work in the enviroCORE, which is the Institute’s environmental research centre, in a team of research supervisors and postgraduate students.

Applicants should have a primary honours degree (Level 8) in an appropriate discipline (Biosciences, Microbiology, Genetics, Biology, Bioinformatics, Zoology, Environmental Science etc.). They must also hold a minimum of a Second Class Honours Grade 1 (2.1) undergraduate degree. The successful candidates are expected start in the postgraduate positions no later than September 2018.

To apply for a President’s Research Fellowship Scholarship, please email with the title(s) of the project being applied for, a CV and a statement (c.500 words) as to why this project is of interest to you. If applying for more than one research project, please list them in your order of preference.

Closing Date: Monday 5th June 2018



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