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Successfully completing this course allows you to progress onto stage two of the British Psychological Society (BPS) qualification in health psychology or a BPS-accredited doctoral programme in health psychology. Read more
Successfully completing this course allows you to progress onto stage two of the British Psychological Society (BPS) qualification in health psychology or a BPS-accredited doctoral programme in health psychology. Successfully completing stage two confers eligibility to apply to the Health and Care Professions Council for registration as a health psychologist.

We designed the course to give you the knowledge, skills, values and academic approach to improve your work and study in health psychology. You learn to:
-Critically evaluate and apply different approaches, theories and models to health-related issues.
-Develop in-depth knowledge and advanced skills related to the design, implementation and evaluation of health-related research.
-Apply problem solving strategies to complex professional scenarios.
-Critically reflect on your practice, planning and personal development.

You can use your work or voluntary experience from within a health-related setting to aid your learning and training. For example, work-based reflection is a core element of the healthcare contexts module and is designed to contribute to your continuing personal development.

You may be able to gain supervised voluntary work experience within Sheffield Teaching Hospitals’ Medical Psychology Service. Potential placements include: diabetes; HIV/GU medicine; renal services; chronic pain; amputation rehabilitation; trauma services; burns unit; spinal injury rehabilitation.

For more information, see the website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/study-here/find-a-course/msc-health-psychology

Professional recognition

This course is accredited by the British Psychological Society.

Course structure

Online and class-based study
Full time – 1 year.
Part time – typically 1 day per week for 2 years.

On campus study
This is a blended learning course that combines online learning with on-campus study days. Full-time students attend a block week on campus at the course start in September, plus 9 days across 9 months (October-June), usually on a Friday in the middle of the month. Part-time students attend the first three days of the block week at the course start in September, and up to 29 days across 24 months.

Modules
There are nine modules that you have to study within 12 months if you are a full-time student or 24 month for part-time, coming in one day a month. These are as follows:
-Applications and practice of health psychology
-Client groups and stakeholders
-Healthcare contexts: work-based reflection
-Health cognitions and behaviour
-Health psychology research project
-Introduction to research methods
-Perspectives, contexts and issues in health research and practice
-Psychobiological determinants of health
-Research methods and measurement issues in health psychology

Assessment: essays; research reports; health needs assessment; ongoing reflection by personal development portfolio; research project.

Other admission requirements

Applications from students who have achieved a 2.2 psychology degree will be considered by the course leadership team. Where there is evidence that at least two of the following criteria have been met the applicant may be offered a place on the course:
-Applicants have work experience in a health-related setting.
-Applicants have an enthusiasm for health psychology.
-Applicants have demonstrated their ability to achieve a 2.1 within their undergraduate degree (for example, transcripts reveal a 2.1 in key undergraduate curriculum areas such as research methods).

All applicants are required to provide two satisfactory references (normally one of these will be an academic reference) and a personal statement.

If you do not have GBC you can do a BPS accredited conversion course. We offer an MSc in Psychology that would give you eligibility for GBC, provided you achieve an overall mark of at least 50 per cent and pass your dissertation. You should be enthusiastic about psychology and have a good understanding of the British Psychological Society’s core areas.

If English is not your first language you typically need an IELTS 6.5 score with a minimum of 6.0 in writing and 5.5 in all other skills or equivalent. If your English language skill is currently below IELTS 6.5 we recommend you consider a Sheffield Hallam University Pre-sessional English course which will enable you to achieve an equivalent English score.

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The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is the largest professional training course for Clinical Psychologists in the United Kingdom, and welcomes high-calibre candidates from the UK and abroad. Read more
The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is the largest professional training course for Clinical Psychologists in the United Kingdom, and welcomes high-calibre candidates from the UK and abroad. The course provides a first-rate training in clinical psychology, leading to a doctoral qualification accredited by the UK’s Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and the British Psychological Society (BPS). The Course’s overarching aim is to train independently minded, scientifically-oriented and compassionate clinicians capable of taking a leadership role in health services at home or abroad.

The UCL Course is at the forefront of many of the national and local developments and innovations which impact on the profession, and many members of staff are closely involved in NHS planning at both national and local level. We aim to equip trainees with the knowledge and skills they need to become effective clinical practitioners in a rapidly changing NHS. The Course has an explicitly pluralistic ethos and exposes trainees to a variety of approaches. It also encourages practice that demonstrates an awareness of equal opportunities and a sensitivity to the multi-cultural contexts routinely encountered in clinical work in London.

The course is three years in length and consists of a mixture of taught lectures, seminars and workshops running alongside a series of 6 placements based in clinical services in and around London. The academic programme is delivered by a highly experienced team of clinical psychologists, many of whom are world-leaders in their academic and clinical fields. The clinical placements provide trainees with opportunities to develop their skills under experienced supervision in a wide variety of contexts, using a broad range of models, and with a wide spectrum of clients.

As a course that is based in one of the world’s top research-intensive universities, UCL trainees have the opportunity to conduct high-quality research under the supervision of leading scientists in the field.

Core Purpose and Philosophy of the Course http://www.ucl.ac.uk/dclinpsy/docs/app_docs/core_purpose_and_philosophy

Applying to the Course

The course welcomes applications from interested candidates from the UK and EU. International candidates apply directly to UCL. Further details can be found on the following webpage: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/dclinpsy/international/

For details of the application process for UK and EU candidates, please choose from the options below.

At present trainees are full-time employees of the health service, and their University fees are paid directly by the NHS. Although there is a possibility that these arrangement may not apply to candidates entering programmes in 2017, this is unclear. As such, candidates should not be deterred from making applications.

This message will be updated as soon as more information is forthcoming.

The closing date for for receipt of applications for courses starting in Autumn 2017 is 1pm on 30th November 2016.

Further Entry Requirements

The UCL Doctorate in Clinical Psychology is a 3-year full-time programme which entitles graduates to apply for registration as a Clinical Psychologist with the Health Professions Council and as a Chartered Clinical Psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Candidates need to meet some basic academic criteria. After that, they also need to demonstrate (by gaining some relevant clinical experience) that they have some awareness of the roles undertaken by clinical psychologists, are familiar with the sorts of clients psychologists see, and have an idea of the contexts within which psychologists work. In addition, they need to show that they have the appropriate personal characteristics needed to work effectively with a wide range of potentially vulnerable individuals, and to contribute to the work of fellow professionals in the NHS or equivalent organisations.


Candidates who have not achieved a good 2.1 may need to think carefully about whether it makes sense to pursue a training in Clinical Psychology, since it is unlikely that they will be offered a place on a Doctoral Course. However, we recognise that sometimes degrees under-represent someone's academic ability - for example, illness or major life-events may have meant that there were periods when it was hard to maintain a good standard of work. If this is the case applicants need to offer clear evidence of their academic capacity in their application. This evidence must be supported by an academic referee who has monitored the candidate's work and can clearly demonstrate that certain academic achievements results underestimate the applicant's academic abilities.

Candidates with a 2.2 will not usually be accepted on the course unless there is unequivocal evidence of subsequent academic achievement equivalent to a good 2.1. In practice this means obtaining a higher degree, but the type of degree needs to be thought about carefully. Some Masters degrees will not offer enough academic challenge, making it hard for an academic referee to make the unequivocal judgment about a student's ability that a course needs. The more academically demanding a course, the more likely it is that they will be able to do this.

Graduate basis for chartered membership
In order to be considered for a place on any training course in Clinical Psychology it is essential to have Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC)with the British Psychological Society (BPS), usually at the time of applying or certainly by the time shortlisting is completed (in February). Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership is the same as Graduate Basis for Registration: all that has changed is the name. So if you previously had GBR you will now have GBC. The usual way of obtaining this is by completing an undergraduate degree in Psychology, or by taking a qualifying exam or programme which confers eligibility.

Not all Psychology programmes confer eligibility for GBC. If you are unsure whether you are entitled to GBC you should check this with your programme staff or write to the BPS (St Andrews House, 48 Princess Road East , Leicester LE1 7DR; Tel: 0116 254 9568; e-mail: ) for more details.


Relevant clinical experience
In order to have a realistic chance of being selected it is essential to gain some relevant clinical experience before applying to the course. There are several reasons for this. It gives applicants a chance to test out whether work in this field is for them - it is much better to discover this before making a major career commitment. It also means that courses know that candidates' applications are realistic, and gives them an idea of how applicants have responded to the clinical work they have undertaken. Many trainees find that they make good use of their pre-training experience during training, so it is not 'wasted' time.

We know that asking for relevant experience causes people to think twice about applying for Clinical Psychology course. It means that there is a gap between completing an undergraduate degree and starting training, with no guarantee of getting on a course. This presents a real challenge to many people, not least a financial one. There is also a risk - widely recognised by courses - that potential applicants feel themselves obliged to work for a number of years in the hope of gaining enough experience to be taken onto a course. We know that most people work for around 1-2 years before getting on a course, and in most cases this should be sufficient.

Being clear about what counts as experience is hard to specify, especially because suitable posts vary enormously. As above, and very broadly, candidates should look for experience which gives them:

. an idea of what clinical psychologists actually do
. some direct clinical contact with the sort of clients psychologists work with
. an idea of what work with clients actually entails
. a sense of the organisational context in which clinical psychology usually operates

One common route is to find work as an Assistant Psychologist. These posts are advertised in the BPS Bulletin (distributed monthly to all members of the BPS) and also (although less frequently) in other relevant publications - for example, the health section of papers such as The Guardian.

As assistant posts are in relatively short supply, it is important to emphasise that they are not the only route to gaining relevant experience. For this reason applicants should think broadly about the possible options open to them. For example, employment in a social work context or as a nursing assistant in a psychiatric unit, or as a worker in a MIND Day Centre would be extremely valuable; all would count as relevant experience. Another route is to take a post as a research assistant, though the research should usually offer at least some direct involvement in a clinical area. It is worth remembering that a very "academic" research post would not give candidates much of a sense of how the clinical world operates, or how they react to the sorts of clients seen in clinical contexts.

There is something of a myth that applicants need to build an extensive 'portfolio' of experience, with more than one client group, and with a mixture of research and clinical experience. Speaking at least for selectors at UCL, we are not looking for this. We are looking for people whose posts map onto the bullet-pointed criteria just above, and who can show (and reflect on) the benefits of this experience in the way they present themselves. Basically it is the quality of experience - and what the person makes of it - that is as important as the quantity of experience.

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This course prepares you for a career as a skilled primary teacher, specialising in physical education. You gain qualified teacher status in Key Stages 1 and 2, along with a PGCE qualification. Read more
This course prepares you for a career as a skilled primary teacher, specialising in physical education. You gain qualified teacher status in Key Stages 1 and 2, along with a PGCE qualification.

Your learning is based on an equal balance of physical education and the core aspects of the primary curriculum. You receive extensive training in English, maths, science and primary practice, alongside specialist PE teaching tuition and experience.

During the course you develop your teaching skills and confidence during professional placements in at least two schools across the two key stages.

You also take part in a compulsory summer school, designed to enhance your coaching skills. This can lead to nationally recognised coaching qualifications in a range of sports.

Throughout your studies you receive guidance and support from a team of lead practitioners and dedicated university and school-based tutors. You also benefit from the input of National Governing Bodies.

Bursary

If you have a 2.1 degree or above and complete this course, you may be eligible for a £4,000-9,000 teacher training bursary.

Further information

For more information regarding our routes into teaching, including funding, placements, QTS skills tests and career prospects visit our teach site.

Course structure

Full time – 1 year.
Starts September.

Topics
You study:
-PE, primary teaching, learning and assessment
-Inclusion
-English
-Mathematics
-Science
-Foundation subjects
-Researching primary education
-Personal and professional development
-The role of the teacher

Modules
The course is made up of modules which integrate experience in schools with professional and curriculum studies.

You complete two masters levels modules. One enables you to evaluate and reflect on your own progress as a teacher. The second enables you to explore a chosen area in more depth in your school or setting and with colleagues in that setting.

The other modules assess your ability against the teacher standards. You are assessed in Key stage 1 and Key stage 2.

Assessment: your academic work is assessed through coursework using a variety of assessment methods. Your teaching is assessed in schools and by school-based mentors.

Other admission requirements

If you are shortlisted, we will invite you to a selection event, and you should bring a passport or photo driving license with you. You can bring other forms of photo ID for the selection event, but if you do, you will still need to present valid identity documents required by the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) at your pre-course day. View our selection event guidance to ensure you understand the selection process. As you will be working with children, you must complete a declaration of criminal convictions and health check forms. We welcome applications from people seeking a career change into primary teaching. We actively encourage applications from those groups under-represented in teacher education to ensure the teaching profession represents the diverse nature of present day UK society.
*GCSE mathematics and English equivalents are:
-12 level 2 credits from an Access course.
-Equivalency test from http://www.equivalencytesting.co.uk
*GCSE science equivalents are
-12 level 2 credits from an Access course.
-science equivalency test from http://www.equivalencytesting.co.uk
-OCR National Level 2 Science.
-BTEC National Level 2 Science, Applied Science or Medical Science.

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On this well-established MSc programme you willdevelop advanced knowledge and skills in key aspects of telecommunications and wireless systems. Read more
On this well-established MSc programme you willdevelop advanced knowledge and skills in key aspects of telecommunications and wireless systems.

The course content is updated annually to maintain industry relevance and to reflect the latest developments in the industry.

We cover the following core (compulsory) topics during the MSc:

- Embedded computer systems
- Digital system design
- IC design
- Microprocess systems
- Research skills and project management.

Part-time study is in co-operation with the students’ employers. Please contact the Programme Director before applying.

Projects

Your project work will earn you 60 credits towards your MSc degree. The project's examined by oral presentation and dissertation.

In your work you'll need to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of your topic, mastery of research techniques, and the ability to analyse assembled data and assess outcomes.

Why Electrical Engineering and Electronics?

World-class facilities, including top industry standard laboratories

We have specialist facilities for processing semiconductor devices, optical imaging spectroscopy and sensing, technological plasmas, equipment for testing switch gear, specialist robot laboratories, clean room laboratories, e-automation, RF Engineering, bio-nano engineering labs and excellent mechanical and electrical workshops.

A leading centre for electrical and electronic engineering expertise

We are closely involved with over 50 prominent companies and research organisations worldwide, many of which not only fund and collaborate with us but also make a vital contribution to developing our students.

Career prospects

Our postgraduate students get to be a part of the cutting edge research projects being undertaken by our academic staff.

Here are some of the areas these projects cover:-

Molecular and semiconductor integrated circuit electronics
Technological plasmas
Communications
Digital signal processing
Optoelectronics
Nanotechnology
Robotics
Free electron lasers
Power electronics
Energy efficient systems
E-Automation
Intelligence engineering.

You'll get plenty of industry exposure too. Our industrial partners include ARM Holdings Plc, a top 200 UK company that specialises in microprocessor design and development.

As a result our postgraduates have an impressive record of securing employment after graduation in a wide range of careers not limited to engineering.

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Enhance your understanding of the processes involved in people becoming substance users and problematic substance users and broaden your career options. Read more
Enhance your understanding of the processes involved in people becoming substance users and problematic substance users and broaden your career options.

About the programme

Addiction problems involve an interaction between the drug, the individual and the environment. This programme provides a critical perspective on substance use and misuse and looks at the evidence base for policies and interventions within the area. Full-time, part-time and distance learning study is available. Study modes are supported by the virtual learning environment, Moodle.

Applicants with a 2.1 honours degree in a relevant subject can study the MSc in one calendar year. Students successfully completing the PG Diploma can progress to the MSc in the subsequent academic session.

Pg Cert Addiction Practice (part-time) 9-21 months; Pg Dip Alcohol and Drug Studies (full-time/part-time) 9 months/up to 36 months; MSc Alcohol and Drug Studies (full-time/part-time) 11 months.

Practical experience

Postgraduate Diploma students can opt to complete a placement in a research setting or a service/workbased setting, or the module ‘Alcohol/ Drugs: Policy/Practice Review’.

Your learning

Postgraduate Certificate in Addiction Practice (3 modules at SCQF Level 11)
• Understanding Substance Use and Addiction
• Change and Intervention Methods
• Placement

Postgraduate Diploma: Alcohol and Drugs Studies (6 modules at SCQF Level 11)
• Understanding Substance Use and Addiction
• Alcohol/Drugs Policy: Change and Intervention Methods
• Alcohol/Drugs Policy: Evidence Science & Policy
• Alcohol/Drugs Policy: Local to Global
• Placement (in current workplace, or an alcohol/drug setting, or a research setting) or Alcohol/Drugs: Policy/Practice Review
• Research Methods – investigates research design and application

MSc (9 modules at SCQF Level 11)
Students will additionally complete a triple module research dissertation with supervised guidance and present their findings in a thesis.

Our Careers Adviser says

Many full-time students quickly find employment on graduation. Part-time and distance learning students use their qualifications for career enhancement or to develop specialisms in social work, health/ medicine or criminal justice.

Financial support

In session 2015/16 the Postgraduate Diploma element of this programme carried SAAS postgraduate loan funding for eligible students. Check http://www.saas.gov.uk for 2016/17 loan info. Many part-time and distance learning students seek funding support from their employers. Independent applications can be made to Alcohol Research UK for either full-time or part-time/distance learning study routes: http://www.alcoholresearchuk.org

Research excellence

Research carried out by our staff underpins all of our teaching activity, which means you’ll directly benefit from our extensive expertise in a variety of fascinating, relevant areas. Our research outputs span academic publications and a range of contributions to official reports. Our research work is coordinated through a set of interdisciplinary research groups in Applied Psychology, Civil Society and Governance, Health Behaviours and Policy, and Social Work.

We would be interested to hear from anyone who might be interested in pursuing postgraduate studies linked to any aspect of our research work. In addition, we offer a range of research-based modules and short courses for continuing professional development. Our portfolio of research-led taught postgraduate programmes is now expanding across the full range of subject areas.

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The one-year CEMS Masters in International Management (CEMS MIM) degree aims to develop multicultural and multilingual managers with a key understanding of European issues and the skills to thrive in tomorrow’s business environment. Read more
The one-year CEMS Masters in International Management (CEMS MIM) degree aims to develop multicultural and multilingual managers with a key understanding of European issues and the skills to thrive in tomorrow’s business environment. It’s a natural choice for high achieving students who possess the potential and desire to take on a senior international management role.With course offerings and business projects designed jointly by faculty and corporate partners, the CEMS MIM programme bridges university education and practical management, offering insights into leadership best practice.

The programme facilitates international mobility, with each student spending one semester at the ‘home’ university and one semester at a partner university. Ultimately a fast track to success internationally, the unique features of the CEMS MIM include a ten-week internship overseas, skills seminars, and completion of a Group Business Project.

Students participating on the CEMS MIM at UCD Smurfit School will pursue the MSc in International Management. Graduates, on successfully meeting the requirements for both degrees, are awarded the CEMS Masters in International Management and an MSc in International Management.

Applicants must meet the following criteria:

• A minimum second class honours (2.1) in business or related discipline
or
• An honours Higher Diploma in Business Studies

Plus students should demonstrate fluency in three languages including mother tongue, as stipulated by CEMS.

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MA Interaction Design Communication is a practice-led design course that prepares students to design for an increasingly technologically informed and interdisciplinary design world with skills in the following areas. Read more

Introduction

MA Interaction Design Communication is a practice-led design course that prepares students to design for an increasingly technologically informed and interdisciplinary design world with skills in the following areas: interaction design, design prototyping, physical computing, user centered design, open source digital platforms, design research, foresight and insight, experience design, communication design, speculative and critical design, interactive design and digital arts.

Content

MA Interaction Design Communication provides an opportunity for experimental practice in an area of design that increasingly explores the intersection of the physical and digital domains. With a focus on synthesising thought through rigorous design prototyping (making), digital processes and user perspectives, the course is highly reflective of interdisciplinary practice within the contemporary design, media and communications industries.

The integrated approach of the course to critical thinking provides you with the opportunity to work with critical ideas in an applied design context – for example psycho-geographic practice as empirical research or engaging with other critical theories of space to generate user perspectives. This ensures that ideation processes take on both the macro as well as micro opportunities for innovation and speculation crucial to building a portfolio of highly engaged work.

As well as placing you in a position to work across the board spectrum of interaction, design and communication the course is just as interested in design questions as design answers. This means that the course also prepares you for progression to further design research at MPhil/PhD level as well as to advanced self-directed experimental practice.

LCC has an outstanding team of practitioners and published researchers and enjoys a powerful programme of visiting speakers. The course also benefits from a cross-European collaboration with design industry professionals and higher education institutions and there is an opportunity to visit at least one other centre in Europe during the course.

Structure

Phase 1

1.1 Theories and Technologies of Interaction Design (40 credits)
1.2 Research Practice and Human Centered Design (20 credits)

Phase 2

2.1 Interaction Futures and Speculative Design (40 credits)
2.2 Physical Computing and Design Prototyping (20 credits)

Phase 3

Unit 3.1 Final Major Research Project

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Introduction. The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video. Read more
Introduction
The MA in Film Production is a 1 year full-time programme that begins in October of each year, and offers graduate students opportunities to undertake intensive study in production skills in 16mm film and video.
The programme provides instruction in sound recording and design, camerawork, lighting, editing, scriptwriting, budgeting and directing.
The Department of Media is housed in a purpose built complex with professionally designed studios, cutting rooms and editing facilities.

Course Description
This MA Programme is aimed particularly at people who have a good first degree in a subject such as film, television, or media studies but who have limited practical experience. Good honours degrees in other subjects, together with evidence of a serious interest in film and video production outside a formal academic context, may also be appropriate.

This MA Programme will suit people who want a general introduction to all areas of pre-production, production and post-production within 16mm film and digital video. Although some degree of specialisation is possible this MA should be seen as a general introduction to all areas. One of the advantages of this approach is that all our MA students are encouraged to write and direct their own films.

During the first term of the programme (October - December) students undertake a number of familiarisation exercises in film and video, developing pre-production, production and post-production skills. These exercises include 4 short 16mm productions and a number of video productions. These are carried out in small teams and it should be noted that teamwork is a major focal point of this MA.
In the second term (January - March), the programme concentrates on the further development of skills in scriptwriting, cinematography, directing, sound design/dubbing with ProTools, editing with Avid and compositing with After Effects. During this term students carry out the pre-production for their assessed film/video.
This is then shot and edited in the final term (April - June). A budget of up to £500 is provided to cover the basic costs of production. Students receive support through individual tutorials, group seminars and studio classes.


The MA in Film Production is predominantly practical but it should not be seen only as a vocational preparation. Its important theoretical component is related to the practical side and a weekly two-hour session covers theoretical issues such as narrative style, representation or national identity. In addition, students are obliged to attend weekly screenings and playbacks in the final year undergraduate courses.
During July, August and September students research and write a 12000 word dissertation on the theory underpinning their assessed film.

Resources
The Department's video equipment includes DVC-PRO video cameras (equivalent to Digibeta), tracks, doorway dolly, jib, specialist lighting gear, editing on AVID Xpress Pro, sound dubbing in a digital dubbing suite using ProTools, and software such as Photoshop, After Effects and Flash. There is also a newly equipped 3 camera TV Studio using digital widescreen cameras, gallery with digital desk and sound room with 32 channel mixer.

Our film resources offer fully professional 16mm and Super 16 opportunities, using Arriflex, Aaton and Bolex cameras, Nagra sound recorders, solid state recorders, a fully equipped studio and portable lighting kits for location work.

Outside the Department there is a student run campus radio station, in which many students participate. BBC regional radio (Radio Kent) also operates a studio in the Media building and offers student involvement with professional broadcasting.

Student Destinations
Students who successfully complete the MA have gone onto a wide range of Media related careers often starting at the assistant level and moving up from there. A number of ex-students work within Camera Departments, Producing and Feature Film Editing. Lecturing within Further Education and Higher Education has also been a particularly successful employment route.

Funding
Significant funding may be available for UK and EU students who have a good academic background [e.g. a first class or 2.1 honours degree] from the Arts and Humanities Research Board (A.H.R.C.) Please see their website for application details (http://www.ahrb.ac.uk/) Please note that this application process takes some months with a completion deadline in April.

See our website http://www.canterbury.ac.uk/arts-humanities/media/courses/ma_media-production.asp for more details.

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All part-time students must register for the PG Diploma in the first instance. MEd and PG Diploma in Surgical Education. The MEd and PG Diploma in Surgical Education programme aims to challenge your thinking and develop your practice as a surgical educator. Read more
All part-time students must register for the PG Diploma in the first instance

MEd and PG Diploma in Surgical Education

The MEd and PG Diploma in Surgical Education programme aims to challenge your thinking and develop your practice as a surgical educator. The programme offers a sound theoretical background to the principles of surgical education, an introduction to educational research methods, and the opportunity for intellectual growth and development within a stimulating and supportive environment. Its face-to-face nature enables dynamic discussion amongst your peers and tutors and fosters a community atmosphere from which to collaborate and develop your educational interests.

Programme structure
The PG Diploma consists of Modules 1-7, is available in part-time study mode only, and is delivered over a ten-month period.

The MEd qualification consists of eight modules (Modules 1-8), completed in full or part-time study mode.

The programme comprises five core modules (Modules 1-5) each consisting of one week intensive contact teaching time with further private study required to complete module preparation, coursework and assessment.

The modules consist of:

Module 1 - Policy and context of surgical education (mid October)
Module 2 - Introduction to learning and teaching (late November)
Module 3 - Introduction to assessment and appraisal (mid January)
Module 4 - Introduction to simulation and technology enhanced learning (late February)
Module 5 - Theory and practice of learning, teaching and assessment (late March)

Modules 1-5 are assessed by extended writing. Module coursework can be done in a range of formats but is typically carried out in small groups, often during the module.

Module 6a/b - Surgical Education Specialty Stream and Design Project: Selected at the beginning of the course this module provides an opportunity for students to study an area of interest at greater depth. The module includes individual study, three days face-to-face teaching (mid May 2017), and assessment.

Module 7 - Reflection for Surgical Education Project: Spans the PG Diploma stage and draws on learning across the modules to produce a reflective portfolio on teaching and learning.

Those continuing on to the MEd, or doing the MEd in full-time study mode, will also complete:

Module 8a/b - Research methods (8a) and educational research project (8b): Comprises a taught educational research methods element (8a) and conducting an individually supervised research project, written up as a dissertation (8b).

Part-time MEd students complete Module 8 during year-two of the course (e.g. in November).

Entry requirements

Minimum academic requirement:
Normally a 2.1 UK honours degree in a science, engineering, computing, healthcare or education subject plus basic computing experience. We also accept international qualifications of an equivalent standard. For guidance see our Country Index.
Additional requirements
Normally three years’ relevant experience in a healthcare field and/or relevant teaching/education development and research experience are necessary to take full advantage of this challenging programme.

English language requirements
All candidates must demonstrate English language proficiency for admission to Imperial College. Standards of proficiency are available on the College website.

Is this programme for you?
This programme is designed to: produce graduates equipped to further careers in healthcare and surgery –related education;

Our graduates are positioned to take increasing educational responsibility in Universities, Trusts and professional bodies.

Career prospects
We anticipate that graduates of this programme will be well placed to advance their careers in a range of directions. Many are likely to be fairly senior in their ‘first’ profession; for this group the programmes will represent professionalisation for their existing role. Participants are likely to be seeking career advancement through possession of an appropriate degree at Masters level for careers in royal colleges, NHS trusts (or their national equivalents) and in universities, for example in academic departments of surgery.

Key benefits

The PG Dipoma and MEd programmes in Surgical Education aim to challenge your thinking about surgical education. They embrace surgical education’s interdisciplinary nature by engaging, not only clinical educators, but also scholars from the social sciences, humanities and craft professions to illuminate teaching and learning in surgery. The PG Dip programme develops new areas of teaching to reflect contemporary research and scholarship, and ensures that the themes of surgery and education are always linked.

The MEd component provides the opportunity to learn research skills and carry out a research project under supervision.



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This course takes an integrated approach to the visual world, paying as much attention to the ‘decorative’ arts – furniture, silver, ceramics, textiles and costume – as to the ‘fine’ arts of painting and sculpture. Read more
This course takes an integrated approach to the visual world, paying as much attention to the ‘decorative’ arts – furniture, silver, ceramics, textiles and costume – as to the ‘fine’ arts of painting and sculpture. Students are taught both the visual skills with which to analyse works of art and the art historical knowledge with which to contextualize them. Teaching methods focus on object-based study and regular visits to Christie’s salerooms, museums and private collections are arranged accordingly. Students also attend lectures by faculty and visiting experts and participate in student-led seminars. Frequent trips to sites in the UK and abroad are also organized. Considerable attention is given to working in the art world and professionals employed in various different fields – from dealing, insurance and marketing to curating, publishing and set design – are invited to introduce students to the wide range of job opportunities that exist for them. Written assignments take the form of essays, reports, reviews and catalogue entries in order to help students apply their art historical knowledge in a professional context.

Course components
The core lecture series c.1450 – c.1930 underpins all components of the programme

You will participate in two international study trips a year to major events in Europe and visits to UK sites throughout the year

Object-based study is central to our teaching and will provide you with relevant training for the public and commercial art worlds. This includes practical and research based study of materials and techniques, scientific analysis, style, dating, quality and authenticity

You will be trained in cataloguing to auction house and museum standards. Handling sessions and warehouse and museum visits all occur during the course

Being engaged with current debates about curating will enable you to devise fresh approaches to the display of art works. You will explore practices in art criticism, developing skills to review exhibitions and produce reports

Our Culture and Ideology Seminars will enable you to discuss works of fine and decorative art in their cultural contexts. You'll gain the skills to deliver presentations and generate seminar discussion

You'll be involved in Methodology Seminars - the analysis of technical, art-historical and interpretative texts which provide transferable skills for independent research and individual development

Entry Requirements

Completed application
A university degree, normally at 2.1 level
Applicants whose first language is not English should normally have IELTS 7
Applicants must also provide a 1,000 - 2,000 word writing sample on an art related subject
CV/Resume
Personal statement
Two academic letter references on institutional letterhead (or equivalent professional references for mature students)
Scanned colour copy of passport photo page and previous UK visas if applicable

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Direct and produce your own film. Learn from experienced tutors who've screened work for the BBC and Channel 4. Find out how to pitch and compete for commissions. Read more

Introduction

Direct and produce your own film. Learn from experienced tutors who've screened work for the BBC and Channel 4. Find out how to pitch and compete for commissions. With MA Documentary graduates who've achieved distinction in leading industry awards and screenings, this course gives you the chance to become another of the celebrated faces behind the camera.

Content

Get to grips with the entire documentary film making process on this comprehensive course which blends theory with practical experience.

London College of Communication’s MA Documentary Film course leads on exploring the full range of documentary genre and modes of production that have brought about recent innovation. The digital revolution means new ways of directing, producing, and showing documentary films in the broadcast, independent and web 2.0 media. You will learn the entire process, taking the roles of Producer, Director, Camera Operator, Sound-Recordist and Editor.

You can expect to be grounded in documentary direction, camerawork and editing - the key artistic and technical skills for a successful production team. Each year students take their work from LCC onto the competitive British and international documentary filmmaking circuit. You will enhance your career prospects through the valuable skills, vision and opportunities that this postgraduate course provides, including guidance on pitching for funding and commissions.

Structure

Phase 1

1.1 Documentary: process and practice
1.2 Documentary: history and theory

Phase 2

2.1 Documentary Practices: taster tape and pitch and critical context
2.2 Documentary: ethics and methodologies

Phase 3

3.0 Major Project

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Understanding, translating and communicating brand stories graphically. it's what today's key branding designers do. Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, MA Graphic Branding and Identity challenges the whole meaning of graphic branding. Read more

Introduction

Understanding, translating and communicating brand stories graphically: it's what today's key branding designers do. Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, MA Graphic Branding and Identity challenges the whole meaning of graphic branding. Explore the strategic thinking underlying brands and look at how that strategy can drive the creative expression.

Content

Driven by intelligent enquiry and evaluation, this programme encourages students to challenge what is understood about the meaning of graphic branding. It explores the strategic thinking underlying brands and focuses on how that strategy can drive the creative expression.

Look around you and you will see examples of the power of brands - on the High Street, within organisations and in the media. From Coca Cola to Virgin, the most successful brands are worth billions.

This MA course focuses on the role of visual identity within branding. The aim is to produce versatile and creative practitioners who understand design within a business, social and cultural context.

It addresses the subject from a broad perspective, covering individual, group, cultural, national, international, corporate and commercial identities. You will be encouraged to look critically at the graphic elements which make up a contemporary visual identity. The emphasis is on practical design, supported by theoretical components and the application of clear research methodologies. As well as developing a deeper knowledge of branding and graphic design, you will gain an understanding of how to develop brand strategies and propositions. An important part of the course involves developing an independent personal project that investigates these principles and their application.

Learning at this level will be about research, intellectual engagement, discovery, interaction and change. The final product for us is not in itself the goal - it is the research, exploration, evaluation and intellectual understanding of branding and identity that makes this MA distinctive.

Structure

Phase 1

Unit 1.1 Design Literacy
Unit 1.2 Research Methods (Visual Research)
Unit 1.3 Major Project Proposal

Phase 2

Unit 2.1 Workshop Options Project
Unit 2.2 Design + Rhetoric
Unit 2.3 Research Methods: Major Project Definition

Phase 3

Unit 3.1 Major Project Resolution: Practical and Report or
Unit 3.2 Major Project Resolution: Thesis

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A communication plan that adds value. it's what every organisation wants. Develop the advanced skills and theory you'll need for a successful career in public relations and communications on this industry approved course. Read more

Introduction

A communication plan that adds value: it's what every organisation wants. Develop the advanced skills and theory you'll need for a successful career in public relations and communications on this industry approved course. Graduate with the knowledge and skills to strategically manage reputations and communicate effectively with the people on the inside and the outside of an organisation.

Content

Gain a solid grounding in the theory and practice of Public Relations with this highly-regarded Masters degree, and accelerate within one of the UK’s most vibrant professions that ranks consistently amongst the top three career choices for new graduates.

Recognised by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR), this course will appeal to those who may already be working in the profession and want to progress, those who are seeking a career move, or those wishing to start their career by establishing a solid knowledge base.

You can expect to develop your intellectual abilities, skills and knowledge needed to strategically manage the reputation of brands and organisations in adding value to their commercial success and supporting their goals. The course will give you a framework for the PR planning process, addressing the critical role of research and evaluation.

You will examine the disciplines of stakeholder communications, events management, investor relations, public affairs and employee communications and how they link to corporate strategy, and be involved in planning and implementing national and international campaigns.

As part of this, you'll explore the most effective use of PR tools such as media relations, change management and issues and crisis management. The specific skills of story telling and writing for media across traditional and digital media channels are also practiced and looked at in depth, along with the role of persuasion and influence.

An understanding of the impact of global, financial, political and opinion former publics will be gained in you honing your ability to communicate with 'publics' as well the ethical, technological and global issues that are inherent within the modern environment.
You'll also explore the wider cultural and societal landscape in which PR operates touching on areas such as celebrity, power and discourse and the wider impact of globalisation. This will help develop your research and analytical skills in preparation for the final dissertation.

Structure

Phase 1

Induction
Unit 1.1 - Contemporary PR Theory and Practice (20 credits)
Unit 1.2 - Organisational Strategy and Reputation Management (20 credits)
Unit 1.3 - Media and Cultural Landscapes (20 credits)

Phase 2

Unit 2.1 - PR Professional (work-based learning) (20 credits)
Unit 2.2 - Media Relations and PR Specialisms (20 credits)
Unit 2.3 - Digital Communications and Social Media (20 credit)

Phase 3
Unit 3.1 - Final Major Project by Dissertation (Research methods embedded during Phase 2) (60 credits)

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that will enable you to pursue a career as a teacher in the further education and training sector, which is predominantly students aged 16 and above. Read more

Why take this course?

that will enable you to pursue a career as a teacher in the further education and training sector, which is predominantly students aged 16 and above.

You can follow a full-time programme at the university, or train on a part-time basis at one of our partner colleges (South Downs College, Chichester College, St Vincent College campus and Eastleigh College). The full time route is intended for those not currently employed in a teaching role whereas the part time route is designed for teachers who currently work in further education and training sector. Both routes encourage you to develop subject-specific knowledge by working closely with your course teachers and work-based subject mentors.

If you are not in paid employment as a teacher, intend to specialise in Mathematics or English, and you have a relevant degree, you may be entitled to a bursary of up to £25,000 toward the full time programme. Read more: Education and Training Foundation FE-ITT Bursary.

What will I experience?

On this course, you will develop your skills as a teacher through practical activity and the study of theories and contemporary issues within further education.

You will join fellow professionals from a range of subject backgrounds for lectures and seminars, creating an effective peer network where a variety of teaching practice can be shared. You will then gain work experience in a teaching placement.

For full time students the course is similar to a full time job as you will attend lectures and seminars at the university or be on placement days per week. While hours may vary slightly a student’s average hours of attendance are from 8.30am to 4.30pm. Placements are arranged by the university for all fulltime students.

On the part time route, you will attend one of our partner colleges once per week (see college’s website for details). You are expected to have secured your own teaching placement where you will teach at least 50 hours per year and have an identified subject mentor.

What opportunities might it lead to?

This PGCE provides the skills and knowledge to take up teaching roles in further education environments, including:

Further education colleges
Sixth-form colleges
Private training providers
Public services
Voluntary organisations
The PGCE is a professional teaching qualification which is recognised by further education providers in the UK. This means upon successful completion you may gain employment with a further education provider. In addition PGCE graduates may apply to the Society for Education & Training (SET) to gain QTLS.

Module Details

Teaching Block 1 focuses on developing you as a teaching practitioner. This involves learning about teaching concepts and developing practical skills in planning and delivering lessons to a high standard, as well as assessing students. This will be delivered and assessed via the following two units:

Unit 1.1 Planning, Assessing and Evaluating Teaching and Learning Programmes: this unit encourages you to understand how to organise and plan your teaching and learning sessions and use different assessment methods, as well as start developing your own personal and professional skills.

Unit 1.2 Theories and Principles for Planning and Enabling Learning in a Specialist Subject Area: in this unit you will examine a range of teaching and learning theories, learn how to plan and develop inclusive learning into your lessons and understand how to use a range of communication and classroom management skills.

Teaching Block 2 is designed to enable you to establish a wider knowledge of the further education sector. You will research contemporary issues which are affecting further education as well as continuing to hone your teaching practice. This will be delivered and assessed via the following two units:

Unit 2.1 Professional Practice: this unit encourages you to review the development of your personal and professional skills, develop a career management file and research into a specific area of your teaching.

Unit 2.2 Curriculum Design in a Specialist Subject Area: in this unit you will learn about the range of contexts in which education and training are offered, analyse theories and models of curriculum design and understand how to promote equality within practice.

Programme Assessment

Teaching aims to demonstrate good practice and therefore employs a range of styles which include seminars, workshops, lectures and active group participation. Your time in class will develop your skills and knowledge to inform your own teaching practice and help to develop your own teaching style.

The emphasis throughout the course is on inclusive learning and teaching combined with reflective practice within a teacher’s own specialist subject area.

Each teaching block you will complete two units of study, with each unit comprising between 2 – 3 assignments. On the full-time pathway you will take both teaching blocks (four units of study) during the year. On the part-time pathway you will take one teaching block (two units of study) each year.

Each unit has varying approaches to assessment. Examples include research based essays, teaching practice files, lesson observations and logging personal development which will be supported by reflective accounts.

Student Destinations

This programme will enable you to teach in further and higher education environments. It is also an eligible course for conversion to Qualified Teacher Status.

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Duration. MSc - 1 year (full-time) or 3 years (part-time). PgDip - 1 year (full-time) or 2 years (part-time). PgCert - 1 semester (full-time) or 1 year (part-time). Read more
Duration:
MSc - 1 year (full-time) or 3 years (part-time)
PgDip - 1 year (full-time) or 2 years (part-time)
PgCert - 1 semester (full-time) or 1 year (part-time)

Simple timetable information
Full-time: 2 days a week
Part-time: 1 day a week

Entry Requirements
An undergraduate Civil Engineering degree with a minimum of a BEng (Hons) - Lower Second (2.2) Classification, or a BSc (Hons) – Upper Second (2.1) Classification. Applicants with appropriate relevant professional experience will also be considered.

Course units
Civil Engineering course units:
– Coastal Engineering
– Computer Aided Structural Design
– Earthquake Engineering
– Finite Element Methods
– Research Methods
– Soil-Structure Engineering
– Steel-Concrete Design
– Transportation and Traffic
– Major Project
Structural Design course units:
– Advanced Structural Analysis
– Computer Aided Structural Design
– Earthquake Engineering
– Finite Element Methods
– Masonry and Timber Engineering
– Research Methods
– Soil-Structure Engineering
– Steel-Concrete Design
– Project

Course description
The postgraduate programmes follow a fixed selection of eight core taught units centred on research skills and relevant technical units. The Research Methods unit aims to equip the students with the necessary skills for planning a research programme, formulating a hypothesis, developing and extending their knowledge of qualitative and quantitative methods, and evaluating the outcome of the research project.

The project unit is an individual submission of an investigation into a specific area of the programme
studied, providing the student with the opportunity to pursue a programme of independent study. The work is to be of an investigative nature having an experimental, analytical, computer based or fieldwork input.

The technical units aim to develop the understanding and application of advanced theoretical contents of the specialist subject.

Career opportunities
Employment prospects for graduates of these courses are very good, especially in view of the upturn in new infrastructure projects in the UK (e.g. Olympics 2012). Successful students enter into a variety of positions within the construction industry, ranging from working in a design office to working
with contractors and in local authorities.

Typical background of applicant
The programme is designed primarily for engineers and other construction industry professionals who are seeking to enhance their understanding of advanced civil, structural and geotechnical engineering technology. It may also be of interest to graduates who are seeking to directly enhance their attractiveness to potential employers.

Professional contacts/industry links
The MSc course is approved by the Joint Board of Moderators as a programme of further learning, in
accordance with Engineering Council requirements.

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