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Reliability Engineering and Asset Management is a critical field of managerial and technical importance to UK and International industry. Read more

Reliability Engineering and Asset Management is a critical field of managerial and technical importance to UK and International industry. It is estimated that 10% of annual typical plant cost is spent maintaining plant. Maintenance costs are likely to influence competitiveness on a global scale and this allows Maintenance Managers to make major impacts on their companies' bottom line.

The programme is a key element in increasing industrial competitiveness and is a sophisticated discipline which embraces management techniques, organisation, planning and the application of substantial electronic, engineering and analytical knowledge to manufacturing processes, transport, power generation and the efficient operation of industrial, commercial and civic buildings. The aim of the programme is to give companies the technical and managerial expertise to thrive in the global marketplace.

On completion of the course students will be able to obtain one of the following degrees: MSc, Postgraduate Diploma (PGDip), Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert).

Course Content

The programme consists of course units which include various aspects of applied management and technology in the field of REAM. It is designed such that after enrolment participants already working in industry will benefit from the structure and content of the course in order to enhance their capability in Reliability Engineering and Asset Management. Our teaching staff are internationally recognised professionals with years of experience working in industry and academic institutions.

The course is offered as indicated below:

HOME/EU

MSc - Full time 1 year; Part time in attendance 3 years*; Distance Learning 3 years**

PG(Diploma) - Full time 1 year; Part time in attendance 2 years*; Distance Learning 2 years**

PG(Certificate) - Part time in attendance1 year*; Distance Learning 1 year**

*4 x 1 week teaching blocks per year; **Attendance = 1 day residential course per module; 2 modules per term - attendance not compulsory but recommended

International

MSc - Full time 1 year; Distance Learning 3 years**

PG(Diploma) - Distance Learning 2 years**

PG(Certificate) - Distance Learning 1 year**

** Attendance = 1 day residential course per module; 2 modules per term - attendance not compulsory but recommended

Accreditation

The course is fully accredited by The Institution of Mechanical Engineers and approved by The Society of Operations Engineers.

Student Experience

Read what students say about the course.

Special features

Reliability Engineering & Asset Management offers a flexible approach to learning as follows:

Full-time in attendanceDirect Taught )

Students undertake eight units. Each taught unit lasts one week and is followed by time for coursework and revision for examinations. Students start work immediately on their project and the programme is completed in one year.

Part time in attendanceDirect Taught )

Students undertake eight units. Each taught unit lasts one week and is followed by time for coursework and revision for examinations. Students start work on their project in the final year and this option is completed in three years.

Part time by Distance Learning

Students undertake eight units, all in distance learning format, each of about three months duration. Teaching will begin with a short introduction allowing students to acclimatise to the Virtual Learning Environment, Blackboard 9. The programme is complete after three years. Students undertake their project in the final year. 

Teaching and learning

The coherent atmosphere in the classroom is to maintain high standards and quality and as such places are limited. Our teaching methods are similar to knowledge transfer concepts as well as case studies without involving much mathematical theories.

Teaching style

Direct Taught - Full and Part time

Each course unit runs for an intensive week-long period and tuition takes place at the University.

Distance Learning

For part-time Distance Learning students, the entire course is delivered via Blackboard, an online virtual learning environment. Two course units per semester are undertaken on-line accessing web-based teaching material which will include text, images, video and animation in parallel, over a three month period. Most importantly web-based teaching generates an interactive environment with real, active communication between students and staff and between groups of students throughout the programme. Distance Learning students will need to visit the University for a 2-day residential per semester for face-to-face discussion with their Unit leader .

Coursework and assessment

Each taught unit of the programme is followed by an assignment which is applied in the work place for part-time students or at the university for full-time students plus an examination either at the University or at higher education institute or British Council in the student's home country.

Assessment is by written examination and assignment. The assignment, which follows the taught element of the unit, accounts for 50% of the total marks, the examination 35% and an in-unit assignment the remaining 15%.

Examination period

Semester 1 - 2nd and 3rd week of January

Semester 2 - 2nd and 3rd week of May

Dissertation Project

The dissertation project is intended to address a real issue in Reliability Engineering and Asset Management and is studied in depth, relating problems in the field to theory, case studies and solution reported in the literature, and often creating innovative proposals and field trials. All students have access to laboratory resources where appropriate.

Course unit details

REAM is a modular programme which consists of eight units, some of which include field and lab work followed by a major project. The earlier units address the management of the maintenance process, including such topics as asset management and maintenance strategy; asset maintenance systems and condition monitoring. Later more specialised units deal with auditing, advanced vibration monitoring, reliability and risk. Units on the full time programme are direct taught, however, part time students can choose either direct taught or web-based distance learning.

All delivery modes cover the same syllabus and lead to the same qualification. View examples of programme structures of individual degree programmes; Full-time , Part-time and Distance Learning . Please see examples of past dissertation projects .

Disability support

Practical support and advice for current students and applicants is available from the Disability Advisory and Support Service. Email: 



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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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This is a one year full-time or two year part-time postgraduate course designed to provide graduate engineers with specialist understanding in one of. Read more
This is a one year full-time or two year part-time postgraduate course designed to provide graduate engineers with specialist understanding in one of: Environmental Engineering; Structural Engineering; or Transport Engineering. In addition, the course offers students the opportunity to obtain knowledge in complimentary subject areas within Civil Engineering.

Course Organisation:

The MSc course can be undertaken as either a one year full-time or a two-year part-time postgraduate course.

The degree programme is divided into three parts: two semesters of taught courses (September - April inclusive) with an average of 12 lectures per week. A major dissertation is undertaken during the second half of the course (April - September inclusive).

It is possible to work full-time and do the course as a part-time option, providing you have the agreement of your employer.

Course Content:

Candidates must take eleven modules, namely the three mandatory modules (M1, M2 and M3) together with at least four of the modules in their chosen specialisation and four other modules, which in total amounts to 90 ECTS.

In the first semester, candidates pursuing the course full time must take modules M1 and M2 along with four other modules selected from options (including at least two from their selected specialisation), listed below. In the second semester, candidates pursuing the course full time must take module M3 along with four other modules selected from options (including at least 2 from their selected specialisation), also listed below:

Mandatory

M1. Civil Engineering Management (10 ECTS)

M2. Research Methodology (10 ECTS)

M3. (Environmental / Structural / Transport) Engineering Dissertation (30 ECTS)

Environmental Engineering

E1. Engineering Hydrology (5 ECTS)

E2. Environmental Monitoring and Assessment (5 ECTS)

E3. Environmental Processes and Technology (5 ECTS)

E4. Waste and Environmental Management (5 ECTS)

E5. Water Quality and Hydrological Modelling (5 ECTS)

E6. Water Resource Planning ( ECTS)

Structural and Geotechnical Engineering

S1. Geotechnical Engineering (5 ECTS)

S2. Advanced Structural Analysis (5 ECTS)

S3. Structural Dynamics and Earthquake Engineering (5 ECTS)

S4. Bridge Engineering (5 ECTS)

S5. Advanced Concrete Technology (5 ECTS)

S6. Soil-Structure Interaction (5 ECTS)

S7. A Unified Theory of Structures (5 ECTS)

S8. Concrete Durability and Sustainability (5 ECTS)

S9. Advanced Theory of Structures (5 ECTS)

Transport Engineering

T1. Transportation Engineering ( ECTS)

T2. Transport Modelling (5 ECTS)

T3. Highway Engineering (5 ECTS)

T4. Applied Transportation Analysis (5 ECTS)

Common

C1. Renewable Energy 1 (5 ECTS)

C2. Renewable Energy 2 ( ECTS)

C3. Modelling of Civil Engineering Systems (5 ECTS)

C4. Facade Engineering (5 ECTS)

C6. Construction Innovation and Research (5 ECTS)


Some of the module options in either semester may be withdrawn from time to time and some new modules may be included, subject to demand. In addition to passing the prescribed examinations, each student must submit a dissertation on an approved topic relating to their chosen specialisation.

Part Time Option:

For candidates taking the course part-time over two years, during the first year, candidates take seven modules, namely: the mandatory modules M1 and M2 along with five of the module options (including at least two from their chosen specialisation) which amounts to 45 ECTS. During the second year, candidates must complete the compulsory M3 module together with three other module options (including at least two from their chosen specialisation) which amounts to 45 ECTS. During the second year, candidates must complete the compulsory M3 module together with three other module options (including at least two from their chosen specialisation) which amounts to another 45 ECTS. By the end of the course, part-time candidates must have completed at least four of their specialisation module options and four of the other options, amounting to a total of 90 ECTS credits. The part time option runs in parallel with the full time course. Full and part time students attend the same lectures which are typically scheduled Monday-Friday, 9-5pm. During the teaching periods, students taking the part time option are typically required to attend 9-12 hours per week during year 1 and 3-6 hours during year 2.

Assessment:

Examination of course modules and completion of a Major Dissertation.

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This two-year taught Masters provides you with an opportunity to study a portfolio of courses in the first year, designed to bring you up to the entry standard for the Master's degree; ideal if you have graduated from disciplines other than Economics, or if you have some background in Economics and wish to deepen your understanding of the discipline. Read more
This two-year taught Masters provides you with an opportunity to study a portfolio of courses in the first year, designed to bring you up to the entry standard for the Master's degree; ideal if you have graduated from disciplines other than Economics, or if you have some background in Economics and wish to deepen your understanding of the discipline.

Subject to performance pre-requisites, at the end of the first year you will progress to the 1-year MSc in Economics, or on to other related MSc programmes of your choice.

The course will provide you with rigorous training in the analysis of economics, including quantitative techniques and research methods. On completion of this degree you will be equipped with the tools of the professional economist and ready for your chosen career path, whether in government, the private and financial services sectors or further research in Economics.

In the first year you will study undergraduate level courses in three core areas: Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Quantitative Methods. You will also select either one or two (depending on their credit value) optional courses from a wide range on offer. In the second year, subject to progression, you will study at Masters level.

You will be taught by a top-ranking Department of Economics with expertise in a wide set of areas and who produce world leading research.

With an intake of only 10 places you will benefit from a strong sense of group identity and enjoy close contact with the academic staff of the Department. The course director serves as your personal advisor up until the spring of the second year, where you will then be assigned a personal dissertation supervisor.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/economics/coursefinder/msceconomics2yearprogramme.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is ideal if you have graduated from a discipline other than Economics or wish to deepen your understanding of the discipline.

- The course offers an excellent opportunity to get a strong grounding in core areas of Economics and to specialise your knowledge further through the wide range of optional courses on offer.

- You will be taught by academics who produce world leading research. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise we were ranked among the top 10 Economics Departments in the UK.

- Our graduates are highly employable; 90% of graduates from the Department of Economics were in full-time employment or further study within 6 months of graduation.

- Our courses are small and select, the 2-year course is limited to 10 students, thus ensuring that you will receive individual attention from the academic staff.

- The Department has expertise in a wide set of areas, including Labour Economics, Experimental Economics, and Public Economics, and the topics taught on our Masters courses reflect these areas of excellence.

- We are one of the few Departments in the UK to have an in-house economics experiments laboratory, used by staff and research students.

Department research and industry highlights

- Economics is among the top departments in the UK for Research Excellence. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 80% of the Department's research submitted was ranked as world-leading or internationally excellent (rated 3* and 4*).

- A recent analysis of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) shows that the Economics Department at Royal Holloway is the third best department in the UK for publications. The study by Jim Taylor and Ian Walker provides further insight into the research standing of UK economics departments. Previous rankings from the data already showed the Department in the top 10 in the UK.

- The Department produces top research across the main fields of the discipline and has particular strength in applied work.

- We run a weekly Internal Seminar which provides a lively forum for work at an early stage of development. Our External Seminar Series runs weekly during term and welcomed over 20 external speakers from prominent places during last academic year. Invitees are the usual mixture of established names and newer entrants to the profession thought to be doing exciting work.

Course content and structure

The duration of the course is 2 years. In year one you will study for 9 months (September to May) and start year two in in the following September. Year two begins with a compulsory two week mathematics refresher course prior to lectures and seminars starting. The dissertation is written over the summer.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced training in the principles of economics and their application appropriate to postgraduate level

- developed the ability to apply the advanced knowledge, research methods and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and/or applied problems in economic policy

- the ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline

- analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world and to be able to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues

- a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment

- the knowledge and skills base from which they can proceed to research in economics and related areas.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

90% of graduates from the Economics Department at Royal Holloway University were in full time employment or further study within six months of graduation.

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different Economic-related areas, including working in the Public Sector (Government Economic Service), journalism, and business analysis. Our graduates are currently working for firms such as Accenture, Barclays, TNS, Bloomberg, Citigroup, Royal Bank of Scotland, Credit Suisse, Pricewaterhouse Cooper and Baker and Mackenzie. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

You career ambitions are supported by our Careers Executive, Dr. Melanie Luhrmann as well as the College Careers Service, located right next door to the economics department. They offer application and interview coaching, career strategy discussions, and the opportunity to network with major employers on campus. Our careers service is provided by the Careers Group, the main provider of graduate recruitment services in London. Thus you will have additional access to a wealth of presentations and networking opportunities.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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This course offers an innovative and integrated route for those looking to become qualified secondary school teachers who need a part-time programme of study. Read more

This course offers an innovative and integrated route for those looking to become qualified secondary school teachers who need a part-time programme of study.

The part-time PGCE is available for those wanting to teach EnglishDesign & Technology, or Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics).

You will take part in University-based workshops and tutorials where you’ll be fully supported by a network including mentors, tutors and peers. At the same time, you will spend an overall period of 24 weeks working in a school environment, gradually taking full responsibility over classes.

We will normally arrange your placement in a school that is already in partnership with us. Most of these schools are in the Greater London area. The timings of the two main blocks of school experience are arranged to meet your requirements and those of the placement schools.

The programme is part-time in order to fit around your individual circumstances and how intensively you are able to work.

Additional costs

On top of your PGCE fees, you will have to cover your travel costs to your school placements.

We produce reading packs electronically and in hard copy format. There’s a small charge for the hard copy reading packs. You may also be asked to contribute towards trips and some materials for your modules.

Structure

The Part-time programme is completed over two years. Attendance to all University taught sessions is required, the flexibility on the programme is around the timings of the school placements and how these are completed (on a part-time or full-time basis).

YEAR ONE

Subject studies module

This is completed in the first year, including the Masters-level assignment. You will be required to attend all the University subject sessions in the first term (normally for 4 weeks at the start of the autumn term) and in sessions that run in January. The teaching sessions run from 9am to 4pm each day. You will also be expected to attend University each Friday of the autumn term.

School experience module

You will complete the equivalent of 24 weeks in school over the two year Programme. We normally expect you to arrange your other commitments to enable you to undertake the school placements on a full-time basis. In some cases in may be possible for you to complete the first school experience on a part-time basis, as three or four days a week over a longer period of time. However, the second school experience (in Year 2) consists of full-time attend in the school for one block of 12 weeks.

In the first year you complete the equivalent of 10 days in a secondary school before Christmas and in either the second or third term you will complete your first school placement, you can discuss the timing of this placement with your University tutor once you complete your needs analysis.

YEAR 2

Studies in Professional Issues and Research in Education (SPIRE) module

In the second year of the programme you complete the SPIRE module (Studies in Professional Issues and Research in Education), including the Masters level assignment. There are a series of taught sessions, some in the autumn term and some of the sessions run in January.

School experience module.

You will complete the school experience module in the second year. The second school placement is 12 weeks completed on a full-time basis.

Learning & teaching

A range of teaching methods are employed across the PGCE programmes, including:

  • Taught subject sessions
  • Taught General Professional Study sessions
  • Practical workshops
  • Core lectures
  • Group tutorials/seminars
  • Individual tutorials
  • Individual and group presentations
  • Supported self-study

As with the other PGCE courses, you’ll be given the opportunity to work with children in a wide range of contexts. These might include focused interventions with individuals or groups, or larger scale events for the community.



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The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law. Read more

About the course

The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law.

The LLM in International Commercial Law provides a flexible route for students to focus on areas of their own interest and further explore commercial law in both the European and wider international contexts.

Our wide choice of elective modules enables students to tailor the programme to their specific needs, selecting the areas of commercial law in which they wish to specialise.

On completing the programme graduates will be able to critically analyse legal concepts as well as practical scenarios. Such knowledge is increasingly sought by law firms, businesses and government bodies all over the world in response to the expansion of international trade, commerce and international regulation, resulting from economic, political and technological change.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will gain knowledge and understanding to confidently tackle areas of controversy in the area of international commercial law

You will be able to assess critically situations and challenges, appreciate the importance of the international boundaries, and the influence of culture on the processes of law.

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of commercial, competition, trade law and financial regulations.

You will gain critical and analytical skills in this complex international field.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on both corporate law and the financial regulations in place.

You will develop the professional skills required to develop a career in commercial law, law practice and the academia.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:
(modules are subject to withdrawal at the School's discretion)

Term I

EU Competition Law 1 or 2
Corporate Law I 1 or 2
Corporate Law II 1 or 2
Theory of International Finance Regulation 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation Law 1 or 2
Privacy and Data Protection 1 or 2
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration 1 or 2
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law 1 - Substantive Legal Issue 1 or 2

Term II

International Trade Law 1 or 2
International Environmental Law 1 or 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Socail Responsibility 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law 1 or 2
Practice of International Financial Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law II - Resolving internet-related Legal Issue or Disputes 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allie Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration1 or 2
International Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

*The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

We promote a personalised learning experience that considers your interests, needs and abilities. This course is delivered through a combination of lectures which introduce you to new subjects and provide an overview of subject matter, and seminars that allow these topics to be investigated in more detail. There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over each of the teaching terms, and classes are taught in groups of approximately 30 students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible start times and learning options
The programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. You will have greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, whihc enables you to choose from a range of options to tailor your studies.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. The Law School is particularly proud of its diverse events programme, which students are encouraged to actively participate in to support their learning.
Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.
Brunel Law School is highly rated for it published scholarship, and recognised amongst law firms for its distinctive courses. The school has considerable expertise in various aspects of commercial law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

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This two-year taught Masters provides you with an opportunity to study a portfolio of courses in the first year, designed to bring you up to the entry standard for the Master's degree; it gives the student the opportunity to strengthen their economics, finance and quantitative knowledge during the first year. Read more
This two-year taught Masters provides you with an opportunity to study a portfolio of courses in the first year, designed to bring you up to the entry standard for the Master's degree; it gives the student the opportunity to strengthen their economics, finance and quantitative knowledge during the first year. Subject to performance pre-requisites, at the end of the first year you will progress to the 1-year MSc in Finance

You will be provided with rigorous training in the analysis of issues in finance and corporate policy while improving your analytical and technical expertise. The programme is ideal for those whose career objectives lie broadly with the financial services and banking sectors. You will have the opportunity to gain an in depth grounding with core courses such as Foundations in Finance, Corporate Finance and Quantitative Methods in Finance, and subsequently tailor your programme to match your end goals through the range of optional courses on offer. These include Fixed Income Securities and Derivatives, Investment and Portfolio Management and Decision Theory and Behaviour amongst others.

You will be taught by a top-ranking Department of Economics with expertise in a broad range of areas, including people who have worked and are still working in the finance industry in the broad areas of asset allocation and risk, as well as algorithmic trading.

With a relatively small intake each year you will benefit from a strong sense of group identity and will enjoy close contact with the academic staff of the department. The course director and course coordinators serve as your personal advisors up until the spring, when you will then be assigned a personal dissertation supervisor.

The MSc Finance is an excellent preparation both for a career in the financial services, banking and business sectors and policy making, as well further academic study.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/economics/coursefinder/mscfinance2yearprog.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is ideal if you have graduated from a discipline other than Economics and quantitative courses, or wish to deepen your understanding of the discipline.

- The course offers an excellent opportunity to get a strong grounding in core areas of Economics and Financial Economics and to specialise your knowledge further through the wide range of optional courses on offer.

- You will be taught by academics who produce world leading research. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise we were ranked among the top 10 Economics Departments in the UK.

- Our graduates are highly employable; 90% of graduates from the Department of Economics were in full-time employment or further study within 6 months of graduation.

- Our courses are small and select, thus ensuring that you will receive individual attention from the academic staff

Department research and industry highlights

- Economics is among the top departments in the UK for Research Excellence. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 80% of the Department's research submitted was ranked as world-leading or internationally excellent (rated 3* and 4*).

- A recent analysis of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) shows that the Economics Department at Royal Holloway is the third best department in the UK for publications. The study by Jim Taylor and Ian Walker provides further insight into the research standing of UK economics departments. Previous rankings from the data already showed the Department in the top 10 in the UK.

- The Department produces top research across the main fields of the discipline and has particular strength in applied work.

- We run a weekly Internal Seminar which provides a lively forum for work at an early stage of development. Our External Seminar Series runs weekly during term and welcomed over 20 external speakers from prominent places during last academic year. Invitees are the usual mixture of established names and newer entrants to the profession thought to be doing exciting work.

Course content and structure

The duration of the course is two years. In year one you will study for nine months (September to May), then start year two in in the following September. Year two begins with a compulsory two week mathematics refresher course prior to lectures and seminars starting. The dissertation is written over the summer.

In year one you will take core courses at undergraduate level that will prepare you for year two.

On completion of the programme you will have the following skills:
- advanced training in the principles of economics and finance and their application appropriate to postgraduate level

- developed the ability to apply the advanced knowledge, research methods and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and/or applied problems in financial policy and investment

- the ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline

- analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world and to be able to appreciate what would

- be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of financial issues

- a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment

- the skills base from which you can proceed to research in finance and related areas.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

90% of graduates from the Economics Department at Royal Holloway University were in full time employment or further study within six months of graduation.

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different Economic-related areas, including working in the Public Sector (Government Economic Service), journalism, and business analysis. Our graduates are currently working for firms such as Accenture, Barclays, TNS, Bloomberg, Citigroup, Royal Bank of Scotland, Credit Suisse, Pricewaterhouse Cooper and Baker and Mackenzie. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a foundation for continued PhD studies.

You career ambitions are supported by our Careers Executive, Dr. Melanie Luhrmann as well as the College Careers Service, located right next door to the economics department. They offer application and interview coaching, career strategy discussions, and the opportunity to network with major employers on campus. Our careers service is provided by the Careers Group, the main provider of graduate recruitment services in London. Thus you will have additional access to a wealth of presentations and networking opportunities.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Additional Entry requirements. Normally a minimum of one year’s full-time experience (or p/t equivalent) of work in a caring capacity or equivalent. Read more

Additional Entry requirements:

Normally a minimum of one year’s full-time experience (or p/t equivalent) of work in a caring capacity or equivalent. Relevant care work includes: nursing assistant, project worker, arts instructor, care work in a community setting, art teaching, or facilitating art workshops. Some experience of personal art psychotherapy or psychodynamic psychotherapy, or experiential workshops in creative therapies is desirable. In the absence of a degree, work experience of 8-10 years in one position will be considered for entry.

International: Where your honours degree has not been studied in English, you will be required to provide evidence of English language competence at no less than IELTS 7.0 and no individual component score below 6.5.

Interview:

Home applicants are expected to attend an interview at QMU and will be required to submit their art portfolio electronically. Interviews will take place normally between December and May.  Interviews for international students will be conducted over Skype.

Criminal records check:

A satisfactory criminal records check will be required

Course Description:

The discipline of art psychotherapy draws upon the visual arts, psychotherapy and psychology and is applied within psychiatry, special  education, social services and the voluntary sector. Art psychotherapists work with individuals, groups and communities. Art psychotherapists enable clients to access their own image-making abilities. The therapist and their client jointly explore the meaning of the process and image/art object in the light of personal experiences and/or interpersonal relationships that may sometimes be distressing or troubling. The aim is to facilitate the intra-personal and interpersonal communication of experiences that the client may initially find difficulty in discussing verbally.

The art psychotherapist’s task is to support processes of emotional integration by providing a safe, reliable and containing therapeutic environment within which the client can create and use art making to develop insight and promote change.  This course is designed for people who usually have at least one year’s experience of, or are currently, working in a caring capacity such as psychiatry, special education, social services and the voluntary sector.

Teaching, learning and assessment

You will attend classes, work in groups and carry out independent learning. Assessment methods include reports, essays, and presentations. Each year group contains 25-30 students. However, most classes take the form of supervision, seminar, lectures and interpersonal learning groups with a maximum of 15 students. You will undertake 110 days supervised practice placement over the training period; placements are allocated by QMU. All students are required to be in personal psychotherapy throughout the duration of the course. Students will attend supervision on site at the practice placement setting and at QMU throughout the training.

Full-time students attend practice placement two days per week and part-time students attend one day per week over two semesters.

Teaching hours and attendance

Year One classes for full-time students take place usually from 9-5pm on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Year Two classes take place from 9-5pm on Thursdays only. Part-time students attend classes on Tuesdays, 9-5 pm and Wednesdays, 9-1pm for Year One and in Year Two, Wednesdays and Thursday only for Year Three and/or Four of the part-time route. You will also be required to carry out independent learning. Full-time students attend practice placement two days per week and part-time students attend one day per week over two semesters. Part-time students wishing to complete their Clinical Project in Year Four will attend personal academic tutorials by appointment. All students will be required to the training programme. The Art Studio will be open for art practice on Mondays, Fridays and weekends.

Links with industry/ professional bodies

Graduates are eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as Registered Arts Therapists (Art) and are eligible for full membership of BAAT (British Association of Art Therapists).

Modules

Level 1 (f/t -year 1; p/t-years 1 & 2) Art Psychotherapy Practice Placement 1/ Art Psychotherapy Therapeutic Skills & Inter- Personal Learning Groups 1/ Interdisciplinary Studies 1/ Pre-registration Research Methods

Level 2 (f/t- year 2; p/t- years 3&4) Art Psychotherapy Practice Placement 2/ Interdisciplinary Studies 2 & IPL Groups 2/ Clinical Project.

All modules are 30 credits, except Clinical Project, which is 60 credits.

Careers

Art psychotherapists work with a wide range of clients and communities, individually or with groups, within the public and private sectors throughout the world. The course meets the requirements of the Health and Care Professions Council Standards of Proficiency for Art Therapists. This degree carries 240 credits/120 European Credits which are transferable across Europe and attracts students from all over the world. Graduates work in a wide variety of different settings across the globe including health, education and the voluntary sector.

Quick Facts

  • Graduates are eligible for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council UK.
  • The course has an international perspective and welcomes students from across the world. 
  • It is the only MSc Art Psychotherapy in the UK based in a school of health sciences and includes a strong research component.


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Occupational Therapy (OT) at Brunel is one of the largest, longest established, and most highly regarded programmes in the world. Read more

About the course

Occupational Therapy (OT) at Brunel is one of the largest, longest established, and most highly regarded programmes in the world. In fact, we are the original ‘London School of Occupational Therapy.’

The MSc Occupational Therapy (Pre-Registration) provides a Master's level route for graduates to become competent occupational therapists equipped for life-long, safe and effective practice within the global marketplace. This course is for those who are not already qualified as occupational therapists. It is a professional full-time programme, which will prepare you to become a competent occupational therapist in a variety of health and social care settings. It also allows students to be eligible to apply for:

Registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).
Membership of the British Association of Occupational Therapists/College of Occupational Therapists.

In December 2016 our programme was granted “Preaccreditation Status” by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE), which confirms that Brunel has successfully completed steps one and two in the three-step accreditation process – see more at AOTA OT Master's-Level Programs - Developing and visit our Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) information page.

The programme will now proceed with step three – the on-site evaluation, scheduled for April 2017, followed by an accreditation decision by mid-2017.

Aims

This programme differs from other Master's programmes in that it is a professional programme at postgraduate level and is full-time. It is not for those who are already qualified occupational therapists. Nevertheless, this course aims to prepare you to become a competent occupational therapist equipped for lifelong, safe and effective practice in a variety of health and social care settings. We provide a high quality educational programme, which ensures that you are properly qualified, prepared and safe to practise.

Occupational therapy students typically choose this career for the following reasons:

variety of work
the challenge
personal and one-to-one contact
client/patient appreciation
its holistic approach
the desire to help disabled people
to work in health settings
job availability
the chance to be creative.

If you are considering studying Occupational Therapy at Brunel University London then you are committed to working jointly with the NHS to demonstrate the values and beliefs of the NHS Constitution.

NHS values
Patients, public and staff have helped develop this expression of values that inspire passion in the NHS and that should underpin everything it does. Individual organisations will develop and build upon these values, tailoring them to their local needs. The NHS values provide common ground for co-operation to achieve shared aspirations, at all levels of the NHS.

Course Content

Programme Structure

The MSc (pre-registration or pre-reg) occupational therapy programme benefits from being integrated with other programmes within the College of Health and Life Sciences. In their first year of study, MSc (pre-registration) occupational therapy students undertake components from a number of the current BSc modules/study blocks, as well as shared teaching with post-graduate students from the divisions of occupational therapy, physiotherapy, social work and community health and nursing studies. In their second year of study, students share modules with other post-graduate students within the division of occupational therapy. Where learning is shared with the undergraduates, the content has been integrated into master's level modules and is assessed at master's level.

The programme comprises two years full time study. Taught modules are within a three-term structure. To provide a balance between academic and practice placements and still meet the minimum of 1,000 hours of practice placements required by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists and the College of Occupational Therapists, three of the practice placement modules extend beyond the term boundaries over the summer.

Academic modules are based at Brunel University in Uxbridge and practice placement modules are provided in a range of health and social care setting and increasingly in voluntary and private organisations including non-traditional settings.

Year One: The Skilled Practitioner – the How, What and Why of Occupational Therapy
Year 1 of the programme introduces students to the "how, what and why" of occupational therapy and aims to give them the opportunity to develop, explore and critique the core occupational concepts and skills of the profession in depth. The arrangement of study blocks and the two practice placement modules (that occur prior to the commencement of academic study in year 2), allow for a reciprocal exchange of academic knowledge and professional skills that develop the student’s understanding and knowledge of the profession further. Applying and evaluating research in practice is essential for occupational therapists, who are required to adopt evidence-based practice. Therefore the students are made aware from the onset of the programme of how research impacts on practice through clinical reasoning and decision-making skills gained in study blocks and also an inter-professional module HH5609: Approaches to Research.

Year Two: Mastery of Occupational Therapy – Advancing Practice
Year 2 of the programme aims to provide students with a more advanced exploration of the occupational therapy profession. Students acquire mastery in critical knowledge and evaluation of key issues on professional practice as well as critical analysis, synthesis and evaluation of theoretical concepts central to occupational therapy. In addition, students study one optional module that enables an in-depth consideration of a specialist area of current practice. Students’ research skills are further enhanced in the second year and culminate in the students producing a research thesis, in the form of a detailed research dissertation. There are two practice placements in Year 2, one at the beginning of the year and one at the end.

Core Modules

Year 1

Introduction to Occupational Therapy Theory and Philosophy
Informing Sciences
Knowledge and Skills for Occupational Therapy 1
The Process of Occupational Therapy Practice
Preparing for the Work Place 1
Occupational Therapy Practice in Context
Knowledge and Skills for Occupational Therapy 2
Lifestyle Redesign Through Occupation
Preparation for Dissertation

Year 2

Preparing for the Work Place 2
Strategies and Visions for Professional Development
People and Communities
The Art and Science of Occupational Therapy

Optional Modules

Occupational Therapy for Children, Young People and their Families
Occupational Therapy in Mental Health
Occupational Therapy in Neurorehabilitation
Occupational Therapy for Active Ageing

Immunisation requirements for the course

Please be aware that the University does not pay for any of the vaccinations or blood tests required to undertake this course, this is the responsibility of each applicant. The University does not offer a service to provide these and therefore we recommend you go to your GP or local travel clinic and start as early as possible. Until the University has evidence that you have these immunisations we will not be able to allow you to enter the clinical environment on practice placement so it is vital that you meet these requirements, ideally before you commence study. You must obtain immunisation against the following and further information can be found on the NHS website.

Please be aware that as occupational therapy students you will be working in hospitals and therefore in contact with patients who have infections so these immunisations are required for students as outlined in the Green Book by the Department of Health.

Hepatitis B x 3 vaccinations over a 6 month period and a blood test is then taken 6-8 weeks after the third dose, to check that the vaccinations have worked. Please note that the Hep B vaccination programme from the initial first vaccination to blood test upon completion, takes 8 months.
Also required is Polio & Tetanusè Rubella, Measles or MMR x 2 è BCG è Varicella Zoster, and evidence of chicken pox or vaccination x 2, or blood test to confirm immunity.
Blood tests are required for Hepatitis B and also for Measles, Rubella and Chicken Pox if there is no evidence in the students medical records. Immunisations are compulsory and are required for clinical placements.

Teaching

The programme reflects educational developments and encourages reflection, self-reliance and deep learning in the programme - to prepare students for the challenges of employment within a changing health and social care system.

Teaching, learning and assessment are designed to ensure that successful students are able to:

Seek out, appraise critically and use appropriate sources of knowledge and expertise within their academic and practice-related studies.
Utilise intellectual, subject-specific and key transferable skills.
Reflect on their experiences and learn from these.

Students’ learning is also supported by web based resources on Blackboard Learn with all modules having lecture and tutorial material posted on this site. Other features of Blackboard Learn are also utilised, such as on-line tests, virtual blackboards, discussion groups and podcasts.

The teaching and learning approaches are founded on the belief that occupational therapy should be grounded in evidence. This is achieved through the integration of academic and practice education which encourages evidence-based activity.

Programme, study and module block descriptors delineate learning outcomes to ensure clarity and promote the active preparation of students. Placements require students to reflect on their personal strengths and weaknesses and set objectives for their learning.
Completion of student evaluation forms requires students to appraise their own learning experiences.

All study and module blocks are core to the curriculum apart from one optional module in the second year, which must be chosen from four options. All modules are compulsory. This policy was adopted to ensure the programme meets with the professional requirements of the Health and Care Professions Council and the College of Occupational Therapists.

Assessment

The assessment procedures within the programme reflect the learning outcomes of each study and module block. Assessments are carried out in assessment blocks. The University term structure allows the student to have assessments spread across the academic year to assist learning.

In order to promote independent learning, a variety of assessment modes are used such as case studies, essays, practical assessments, placement reports, presentations, written examinations, literature reviews and a research dissertation. These assessments are designed to not only reflect master’s level academic requirements, but also professional skills in preparation for practice.

At the beginning of each year the student is provided with the assessment schedule, including assessment and feedback dates. Each assessment is explained clearly to students, both verbally and in the programme handbook, giving notification of assignment block requirements early in the commencement of the relevant study or module blocks. This information is also provided via Blackboard Learn (BBL). Preparation for assessment blocks is co-ordinated by the relevant year leader and undertaken through identified sessions within study blocks.

Special Features

You will complete an integrated research dissertation as part of the Master’s.

You will have the opportunity to work and learn with international students.

You will have the opportunity to learn in a wide range of practice areas.

The programme is accredited by the College of Occupational Therapists (COT) and the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). It is recognised by the World Federation of Occupational Therapy.

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The Legal Practice Course (LPC) aims to prepare you for employment as a trainee solicitor and to provide you with a solid foundation for subsequent practice as a solicitor. Read more
The Legal Practice Course (LPC) aims to prepare you for employment as a trainee solicitor and to provide you with a solid foundation for subsequent practice as a solicitor. This course can be studied full-time or part-time (day or evening). In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 98.2% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

This course provides graduates who have completed the academic stage of legal training with the professional stage of training required to qualify as a solicitor. We have a long-standing reputation for training solicitors and were one of the first universities to be validated to run the Legal Practice Course.

The course emulates the nature of the work encountered in practice and is transactional, following clients through various legal transactions and court hearings. It builds on the substantive law that you will have already learnt and includes the study of both law, and procedure in the major areas of practice. It also teaches the 'lawyerly' skills of practical legal research, interviewing and advising, writing, drafting and advocacy to prepare you for your subsequent professional training and for practice as a solicitor.

The LPC is entirely taught in a modern building with a mock court room, audio visual recording facilities, IT resources and library. Materials and case studies are provided.
-The LPC at London Met provides you with the required knowledge and skills that you will need to qualify as a solicitor.
-We offer work placements and pro bono opportunities to enhance your employment prospects.
-It is the most competitively priced LPC provided by a London university with flexible study options to suit you.
-All teaching is undertaken by qualified lawyers with extensive practice experience and students benefit from personal feedback.
-There is an option to top up the LPC on completion of the course to an LLM in Legal Practice by completion of dissertation.


Teaching is highly interactive and you will be taught in a small groups in three-hour sessions. The tutors are accessible and friendly and classes are supplemented with online tests and revision lectures and materials. The emphasis is on face to face teaching although some lectures, covering more complex subjects, are available online,. The overwhelming response from student feedback is that they prefer live contact with tutors and fellow students. You learn by “doing” on this LPC.

Students attending on either the one year full-time or the two year part-time LPC are required to attend an intensive foundation course for the first week of term in September from Monday to Friday, 10am until 5pm. Compulsory attendance is required for all students, irrespective of whether you are studying full-time or part-time. Please take this into consideration when arranging work, family and holiday commitments.

You can choose to have all your face-to-face tuition and workshops for the core practice areas concentrated into two set days a week on our one year course. This is usually Tuesday and Thursday from September until June. It enables you to reduce your travelling costs and plan your week. You attend an average of 12 hours face to face contact per week with the remaining time devoted to private study. Please note however, you may have to come into the university on additional days for assessments. Also Stage 2 elective subjects may run on different days.

Students who wish to complete the Legal Practice Course over two years can attend either in the evenings or during the day. The part time evening classes are taught from 6pm until 9pm on Tuesday and Thursday in the first year and Monday and Wednesday in the second year. The part-time day classes are taught from 10am until 5pm on Friday in the first year and on Monday in the second year.

Assessment methods are designed to reflect how solicitors work today, and include skills assessments and open book examinations.

Professional accreditation

London Metropolitan University is an SRA (Solicitor Regulation Authority) approved LPC provider.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advocacy Skills (core, 0 credits)
-Business Law and Practice (core, 24 credits)
-Drafting Skills (core, 2.25 credits)
-Interviewing Skills (core, 5.5 credits)
-Legal Writing Skills (core, 2.25 credits)
-Litigation (core, 39.5 credits)
-Professional Conduct and Regulation (core, 1.5 credits)
-Property Law and Practice (core, 24 credits)
-Research Skills (core, 2.75 credits)
-Solicitors Accounts (core, 6 credits)
-Wills and Administration of Estates (core, 2 credits)
-Advanced Business Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Child Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Civil and Commercial Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (option, 13.5 credits)
-Commercial Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Corporate Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Employment Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Family Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Housing Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Immigration Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Intellectual Property Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Private Client Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)

After the course

Helping LPC students to get a training contract and legal work experience is central to what we do. Each student is designated a professional mentor to provide individual advice and guidance. We offer a number of work placements within solicitor’s firms, at court or within not-for-profit organisations to enhance your CV, provide contacts and networking opportunities. We also offer pro bono work for students who need to enhance their links with the solicitors’ profession. In March each year we run a career development week to help focus on your career prospects. We offer mock interviews, CV surgeries and networking workshops. Our excellent careers service can also help you in obtaining training contracts and valuable work experience.

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The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas for research degrees. In addition to the particular research interests of each member of staff, we have a number of postgraduate students undertaking research of contemporary social and political relevance in Britain and Europe. Read more

The Department of Anthropology offers supervision in a wide range of areas for research degrees.

In addition to the particular research interests of each member of staff, we have a number of postgraduate students undertaking research of contemporary social and political relevance in Britain and Europe.

Current students are engaged in research projects covering a broad range of subjects, located in Africa, Europe, Latin America, and the Middle East.

Find out more about research degrees at Goldsmiths

How do I choose between MRes and MPhil/PhD?

Normally research students register for the MRes in order to complete the requisite training for carrying out a doctoral research project. You then transfer to MPhil status after completing your MRes dissertation in September (or in your second year if you are part-time).

However, if you already have a substantial background, it is possible to register directly for the full-time MPhil, provided the Department and your future supervisor(s) agree. MPhil-registered students do exactly the same research training as MRes students, but they present a student dissertation in May, in order to fast-track to fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Whether you start registered as MRes or MPhil, upgrading to PhD status takes place at a later date.

First year

In the week before the beginning of the academic year in mid-September there is an Induction Programme for all new research postgraduates at Goldsmiths. You will be introduced to College and Departmental facilities and procedures, and attend workshops on what is involved in doing a research degree.

For the first year you are normally registered for the MRes. It is a training year, in which work on your own research project is coupled with general training in Anthropological and Social Science Methods - run both within the Department and by the Goldsmiths College Research Office - as follows:

  • Methods in Anthropological Research (20 weeks x 2 hrs)
  • Research Design (20 weeks x 2.5 hrs)
  • Quantitative Methods in Social Science
  • Department of Anthropology Research Seminar

You may also take other modules depending on your specific training needs, such as learning a language, or auditing an MA course, either in the Department or elsewhere, of particular relevance to your research project. You are also encouraged to attend seminars in other parts of the University of London, attend conferences, and go on outside modules such as those organised by GAPP (Group for Anthropology in Policy and Practice). There are Departmental funds to enable you to attend such events.

At the end of the first year, MRes students present a 15,000-word dissertation in September, which discusses in depth their proposed research topic and the relevant literature. Students registered for the MPhil present a 10,000-word dissertation in May. You need formal approval from the Department before you can start your fieldwork or other forms of data-collection.

Fieldwork and writing up your thesis

Whether you are doing fieldwork down the road or data collection on the other side of the world, it is important that you submit regular reports to your supervisor/s. At the end of the data-collection period when you return to the Department, you join the Writing-Up seminar, which meets weekly to discuss students' draft chapters.

Some time after you return from data-collection (after about 8 months for full-time students, and 16 months for part-time students) you are required to present a detailed thesis outline and 2 draft chapters for consideration by your Advisory Committee. Students normally upgrade to PhD status at this point. You are expected to complete a PhD in 3-4 years (full-time registration) or 4-6 years (part-time registration). An MPhil thesis is shorter and should be completed within 3 years (full-time) or 4 years (part-time). Some students move between full-time and part-time modes. For example, they may do their training on a part-time basis and then seek funding for a year's full-time fieldwork, reverting once more to part-time mode for the writing-up period. We are happy to encourage such flexibility.

Assessment

Written thesis (100,000 words) and viva voce.



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About. The MFA Fine Art course in Belfast was established in 1979.  Since then, 320 emerging artists, 21 full-time staff (including six Course Directors) and over 200 visiting artists have exerted their individual and collective influence on the shape and direction of this program of study. Read more

About

The MFA Fine Art course in Belfast was established in 1979. Since then, 320 emerging artists, 21 full-time staff (including six Course Directors) and over 200 visiting artists have exerted their individual and collective influence on the shape and direction of this program of study.

The course continues to produce artists of international reputation as evidenced by the success of graduates in major national and international prizes and competitions including the Turner Prize, Paul Hamlyn Award, Becks Futures, Bloomberg New Contemporaries, the Glenn Dimplex Award and the Nissan Art Award and through representation at international biennials such as the Venice Biennale. Public art, film production, gallery management, community arts, curation and arts administration are wider areas where graduates have been internationally successful. The course has also been immensely influential in the sphere of art education across Europe with a high number of academic, research, teaching and management positions being held by our MFA graduates.

The course retains the core values from its inception in 1979 and so builds upon 30 years of innovating and fostering relevancy, criticality and quality in today’s contemporary art world.

The programme aims to promote individual contemporary fine art practice towards presentation as an exhibition or equivalent public output. It provides a learning environment that supports a wide range of modes of production for art in which you can demonstrate a sound understanding of the practical, intellectual and creative aspects of your practice as an artist. It also aims to facilitate engagement between and among art practitioners in order that you can locate your practice and that of other art practitioners within contemporary culture.

A capacity for self-directed learning is a prerequisite for the programme. Fostering individual creative development is a key concern. Formal tutoring is based upon the expectation of self-motivated personal development and research. Re-evaluation through teaching, criticism and research is a fundamental aspect of the course.

Regular discussion based on studio work and issues around contemporary practice involves the whole course. Peer learning from studio work and informal discussion is also a valuable experience. Assessment is directed at the quality and significance of the output as contemporary art practice.

The programme is also offered in three part-time pathways. All of the part-time modes require the student to have their own studio space independent of the institution.

The 2010 Turner Prize was won by MFA graduate Susan Phillipsz (1994). Other nominated graduates include Phil Collins, Cathy Wilkes and Christine Borland. Graduates of the MFA have been substantially represented over the years in other high profile events and prizes, including the Venice Biennale, Becks Futures, The Nissan Art Award, New Contemporaries, The John Moores Prize and the Glenn Dimplex Award. Two graduates have been awarded the highly competitive Paul Hamlyn Award. Film production, art writing, gallery management and curation are allied areas where graduates have also been internationally successful.

Attendance

The MFA programme is offered in full-time mode over 2 academic years. There is an exit qualification of Postgraduate Diploma after one academic year, with a further one academic year for MFA completion.

Formal teaching input is delivered through tutorials, weekly studio critiques and student or staff-led seminars and lectures. Independant study and self-directed learning are fundamental aspects of the course.

Assessment: Through exhibition of studio practice and supporting written and oral presentation.

The programme is also offered in 3 part time pathways. All of the part-time modes require the student to have their own studio space independent of the institution.

Part-time route 1:4 years part-time model of the 2 year course.

Part-time route 2: 3 years. This model allows a student to study the first year full-time with transfer to the part-time mode for the second year. It is envisaged that this route will be most appropriate to a student for whom the necessary infrastructure is not initially in place to allow them to undertake the course part-time. This may include candidates from abroad who by the second year have become familiar enough with the local setup to have acquired a studio and relevant support structure.

Part-time route 3:2 years. This model is based on candidates convincing the course team that the quality of their work over a number of years is of sufficient standard and that learning outcomes of the modules Practice 1 and 2 have been met to enable them to enter the course with compensation for prior learning.

Advanced standing

Advanced standing is possible – where an applicants experience is taken into account in order to be exempt from certain aspects of the programme. This may apply to full or part time attendance. Please contact us to discuss this if it is something that may be appropriate to you.

Work placement / study abroad

On the programme you will gain work placement experience at one or more of our external partners, for example Catalyst Arts or Platform Arts. Within this process you will be tasked with developing a professional exhibition of your own work as a group within a partner organization. This usually is undertaken of several weeks – with an intense period working on-site alongside professional colleagues.

Career options

As practising artists, many of our graduates go on to establish their own studios, successfully exhibiting nationally and internationally, gaining public art and gallery commissions, residencies, fellowships, awards and prizes. Others develop careers in other sectors of the arts, such as curatorial practice, arts writer, art critic, community arts, education, academic art research, art facilitation and administration, while others have built reputations in the wider creative fields where innovative artists are highly valued as problem solvers.



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- 21st Century Innovation. There has never been a better time to study innovation! Innovation is the no. 1 priority of the Irish government as a driver for economic growth; it is the central pillar of EU and US development strategies. Read more

Overview

- 21st Century Innovation
There has never been a better time to study innovation! Innovation is the no. 1 priority of the Irish government as a driver for economic growth; it is the central pillar of EU and US development strategies. Companies large and small also recognise the essential need for early-stage innovation research that uncovers crucial understanding of user needs, socio-cultural trends and insights, which lead to exciting and differentiating new innovation concepts.

“There is political agreement in Europe that to ensure competitiveness, prosperity and wellbeing, … the progressive shift in emphasis of European innovation policy from exclusive reliance on ‘technology push’ to more demand- and user-driven innovation must continue.”

(Design as a driver of user-centred innovation EU Commission, April 2009)

- For all Innovation Leaders
This MSc offers the opportunity to become a leader in Design Innovation for your organisation. The MSc in Design Innovation gives a practical education and experience in the key themes that drive 21st century innovation, such as innovation strategy and deep understanding of human needs, behaviours and socio-cultural trends. You will learn the methods to research, acquire, analyse and present this understanding as well as the techniques and skills to synthesise actionable innovation concepts.

Course Structure

The programme is delivered by assignments, lectures, workshops and dissertation. A large portion of the learning is experiential through case research, workshop discussion, fieldwork and individual or group assignments. A substantial field project is carried out in the third semester, with a written dissertation on completion. All modules and dissertation are 100% continuously assessed, with no end of semester written examinations.

- Modules
The programme is delivered over 12 months (full-time) or 24 months (part-time). It is structured in a modular format to facilitate part-time study over 2 years while staying in employment. Also, modules may be studied individually with individual certification and for accrual of credits towards a Diploma or Masters award.
Taught modules are delivered in semesters 1 & 2 (Autumn and Spring).
Dissertation project, including field research, is carried out in semester 3 (Summer).

Career Options

This MSc programme is ideal for anyone aspiring to be an effective radical innovator. In particular, it directly prepares graduates for the roles of innovation leadership, innovation management, product management, strategic marketing, market research, design strategy and new product or service development in a wide variety of sectors such as technology, pharmaceutical, agri-food, design, manufacturing, service industries and all areas of the public service.

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC Code
MH50K Full-time

The following documents should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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Course outline. Read more

Course outline

The major aim of the Master of Science in Health Economics (MScHE) program is to provide first-class training in theoretical foundations and practical applications of health economic methods needed for decision-making, policy-making and development and research in health and health care, within the context of the ethical principles of society. More specifically, the foundation for specialization in health economics is provided through coursework in the core areas of health economics, specifically microeconomics, econometrics, and economic evaluation of health and health care programs.

In order to ensure the students have the experience and skills necessary to successfully participate in public health and health services decision-making there is an in-depth training in health systems and in economic principles that guide the organizations and functions in the health care system. Moreover, students are provided with current tools to participate in the frontier of health economic research and practice.

Course structure

The MscHE program is a modular programme, allowing for full-time (1 year) and part-time (2 years) study. Before commencing the programme applicants should decide which mode of study they want to follow. Both modes of study have the same course components, credit requirements and lead to the same final degree.

The course is structured into four (4) compact teaching modules, followed by a period of individual research work.

The first module - Introduction in Economics, Methods & Theory - consists of two (2) introductory self-study courses with an expected learning time of two (2) weeks of full-time study. One of them discusses the ethical foundations necessary for normative economics and provides an introduction to health policy, while the second supplies a review of the basic mathematical methods applied in economics. The inclusion of self-study courses at the beginning of the program clearly communicates to students that in this programme they need to be highly motivated and self-directed if they are to be successful.

The second module comprises several taught courses lasting six (6) weeks. They are designed to help the students to achieve a sound overview of health economic theory and methods. There is one (1) additional week for the exams.

The third module - Health Care systems & statistics - builds on the foundations established in the second module and introduces students during six (6) weeks. It is again followed by one (1) week for the completion of exams.

The fourth and final module - Applied Economic Research - focuses during ten (10) weeks on the advanced strategies and skill-building necessary for health-economic research and practice. This module is also completed by one (1) week of exams following the courses.

Thesis (25 ECTS)

After successfully completing the taught part of the program, students move on to the research work for their final thesis. This project is designed to enhance students’ ability to independently discern a research issue that is both relevant and substantial, choose the methodology for dealing with it, and gauge the impact of the findings at a practical and policy-related level. To make this a fruitful learning experience, students are systematically guided throughout the work on their thesis by an academic tutor.

Cooperation Partners

The MscHE’s international connectivity links it with leading institutions in research, education and industry, a fact that contributes greatly to the development of a diverse, globally engaged health-economics research community and workforce. Practical experience outside their programme of study can be arranged for students with the help of our industrial partners, governmental and research agencies, and academic research collaborators in Germany, Europe and abroad.

Curriculum

The Curriculum can be found here.

Formal requirements

Admission to the Master’s course is restricted. Please consult the Admissions Regulations for detailed information.

Admission prerequisites

The programme is open to medical doctors and other professionals with an initial health-related academic degree (above average) equivalent to 240 ECTS (usually a Bachelor degree after at least 4 years of full-time study) plus work experience of minimum one year in a health-related sector.

The language of instruction is English. Students whose mother tongue is not English must furnish evidence of proficiency in English, usually by certification of an IELTS score of min. 7.0, or TOEFL iBT of 100 or Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English - CAE. Exemption from this requirement may be granted to students who have completed their prior education in English (written proof required with application).

High motivation, self-reliance and team skills are qualities that participants should both possess and display. In a two-page “personal statement” issued in English language, prospective participants are asked to document these qualities, indicate their academic and personal goals, and enlarge on the study and research interests prompting them to apply for the programme.

Letters of recommendation preferably issued by the latest employer or by a professor of the university awarding the academic degree complete the application.

Application and admission

The application for the MScHE program requires submission of a printed application form, complete with supporting documents.

Admission to the Master’s course is restricted. Please consult the Admission Regulations (english version) for detailed information

Academic year/ Time schedule

The academic year starts on September 1 and is split into two semesters (September-February/ March-August).

Full-time study means that students finish the taught parts of the programme in the first semester and write their thesis in the second semester.

Part-time study means that study duration extends over a period of 2 years with defined periods of full-time attendance. Part-time students begin in year 1 by participating in taught modules in the 9 weeks from September to the end of October. In year 2 they continue with taught modules from November to the end of March. The M.Sc. thesis is completed at an individually chosen point thereafter. During taught modules, full-time attendance is necessary, between the modules there is no programme on offer.



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University of St. Gallen Introduction. The University of St.Gallen is a leading European business school located in Switzerland. Founded in 1898, today it has the leading business school in the German-speaking area, with more than 7,000 enrolled full-time students. Read more

University of St. Gallen Introduction

The University of St.Gallen is a leading European business school located in Switzerland. Founded in 1898, today it has the leading business school in the German-speaking area, with more than 7,000 enrolled full-time students.

St.Gallen offers a full range of undergraduate, postgraduate, executive and doctoral Programmes, and is accredited by both EQUIS and AACSB. It benefits from a strong reputation for quality, particularly in the German-speaking countries of Austria, Germany and Switzerland. It is also recognized in major rankings, both at the MBA-level and the university as a whole. Students benefit from the University's close ties to leading international companies and 20,000 strong alumni network. The MBA programmes are part of the Executive School within the University of St.Gallen.

St.Gallen is located in Eastern Switzerland, one hour from Zurich city centre and 45 minutes from Zurich International Airport. It is at the heart of Europe, well-served by rail links to Paris, Geneva, Milan and Munich all a few hours away. St.Gallen lies near the shores of Lake Constance, and the borders to Germany and Austria. To the south of the city lie the Alps.

MBA Programme Overview

Core courses provide the broad range of skills that MBAs seek. Integration courses tie together the functional skills encountered in the Core phase. They are strategic and practical. Electives enable MBAs to narrow their focus and drill deeper into subject matter of personal or professional interest. MBAs work in-house with companies for 10-12 weeks. Students also have the option to write a business plan or a research paper, if this better aligns with pursuing their post-MBA career goals. Interaction with Career Services happens throughout the entire programme. The purpose is to deliver soft skill training and clarify post-MBA goals. Ongoing 1-to-1 support.

Full-time MBA

The 11 month Full-Time MBA programme is taught in English and has a weekly structure. The programme starts in September each year. In addition to the core and elective courses taught in St.Gallen Switzerland, students also have the opportunity to take a study mission to a foreign country. We offer exchange and elective options at Copenhagen Business School, Imperial College London, Macquarie University and Nanyang Technological University.

Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid

The following fees are for the 2018 intake.

Full-time MBA tuition: 56,500 CHF

1. Early Enrolment Discount

The early enrolment discount of CHF 5,000 is available to students who enrolled and paid the enrolment fee before 31 December 2017.

2. Early Payment Discount

Any fee payment, in excess of the application and enrolment fee, paid by 31 March 2018 prior to the start of the programme, will be eligible for a 5% early payment discount. Any remaining fee must be paid according to the payment schedule.

Scholarships and loans may be awarded. Please contact our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers for more details.

Entry Requirements

1. Bachelor's Degree

You are required to hold a degree from a recognised university or accepted institution of higher education. Please contact one of our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers for more information on whether your degree is from a recognised university.

2. GMAT, GRE, Admissions Test and Test Waivers

Applicants for the MBA programme are required to demonstrate their numerical, grammatical and critical thinking abilities. This can be done in one of the following three ways:

a. Submit a competitive GMAT or GRE score no older than five years (no minimum score)

b. Complete our MBA admissions test with a minimum score of 80%

c. Hold one or more of the following qualifications: PhD, CFA Level 2, CPA, or a similar qualification assessed on a case-by-case basis

Please feel free to contact one of our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers to learn more about your options. If you plan to take the GMAT, but haven't yet, you can also contact them for more information about our GMAT preparation courses in Zurich.

To submit a GMAT or GRE score, please use the following school codes for the University of St.Gallen MBA:

GMAT: 5RK-QG-13

GRE: 0413

3. Fluency in English

Evidence of English fluency must be provided in order to gain acceptance to our programmes, as all coursework, lectures, guest speaking events and academic material is conducted in English. If you have completed another degree in English, this would be considered. For evidence via language proficiency testing, we accept TOEFL, IELTS, Cambridge Certificate and PTE Academic.

Institution Code TOEFL: 0198

4. Work Experience

A minimum of two years full-time post-Bachelor degree work experience is required, with at least four years of work experience recommended.

5. Speak with our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers

Before submitting your application, we strongly encourage you to contact one of our Senior Talent Acquisition Managers to learn more about whether our programme matches your MBA goals.

Website and Contact

Website: http://www.mba.unisg.ch

Email:



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