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As the European Union has developed into new policy areas, EU law has grown in significance. The LLM in European Law offers students the opportunity to gain a detailed knowledge of EU law in a range of fields. Read more
As the European Union has developed into new policy areas, EU law has grown in significance. The LLM in European Law offers students the opportunity to gain a detailed knowledge of EU law in a range of fields. These include constitutional law, the law relating to the single market, competition law, environmental law, employment law, the law on migration, and human rights law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of European Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM100 EU Immigration Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM101 EU Criminal Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM106 EU Constitutional Law I - Concepts, Values and Principles (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM107 EU Constitutional Law II - Governance (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM122 European Union Tax Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM190 EU Healthcare law: Rights, Policies and Instruments (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM193 Free Movement of Persons in the European Union (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM311 Policing in Local and Global Contexts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM312 Comparative Criminal Justice (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM317 Competition and the State: EU State Aid Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM318 Competition and the State: Regulation of public services in the EU (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM326 The Law of the European Convention on Human Rights (sem 1)
◦ QLLM327 European Union Human Rights Law (Sem 2) (Not Running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM346 EU Copyright Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM353 EU Data Protection Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)

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Intended specifically for students pursuing a career in Architecture, the Professional Diploma course offers a unique combination of design-based academic study and practical hands-on learning. Read more

Part II in Sustainable Architecture

Intended specifically for students pursuing a career in Architecture, the Professional Diploma course offers a unique combination of design-based academic study and practical hands-on learning. The course is prescribed as a Part II qualification by the Architects Registration Board and is recognised by the EU, thereby enabling students to move on to a Part III qualification.

Students are introduced to a range of skills that are increasingly in demand within the building industry. The focus is on designing buildings in their context, to allow for adaptation to the effects of climate change and to create healthy environments for all.

Teaching is delivered in the WISE building - itself an example of recent developments in sustainable construction - and includes a mix of studio- based design work, lectures, seminars and practicals. The annual Summer School enables students to design, detail and build a structure at CAT using the local materials available.

Modules include

- Design studies with professional practice
- Building performance and energy use
- Building performance and the use of materials
- Design and fabrication: renewable energy engineering
- Environment, energy, climate and human beings

What qualification will you receive?

Successful completion of the programme Professional Diploma in Architecture: Advanced Environmental and Energy Sudies at the Centre for Alternative Technology leads to the award of Professional Diploma (ProfDip) by UEL.

Course Structure

The programme runs as eight interlinked modules over a period of eighteen months. The major design project module consists of 60 credits; with two further 30 credit design modules. Each support studies module consists of 30 credits.
The programme is divided into two parts:
Design Studies, forming the core activity
Support Studies, consisting of Environment and Energy Fundamentals, Building Technology in an Environmental Context, History and Theory of Architecture and Professional Studies.

At the beginning of each Module students are given the Module Book which contains lecture notes, reading material, examples of student essays and design work and various items of information and administration. During each module there will be cross disciplinary seminars, workshops and tutorials, as well as specialised design sessions.

Why study at CAT?

Studying at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) is a truly unique experience. For the past 40 years CAT has been at the forefront of the environmental movement, pioneering low-carbon living and renewable technology. At the Graduate School of the Environment (GSE), students benefit from our extensive practical and academic knowledge, graduating with the skills needed to become leading players in the sustainability sector.

Sustainable Architecture taught in Sustainable Building

The Professional Diploma Part 2 course is taught in the Welsh Institute of Sustainable Education (WISE building). This iconic building was named building of the year by the Telegraph in 2010, it also won a internationally recognised RIBA award in 2011. Designed by CAT architects Pat Borer and David Lea, it includes:
a 200-seat circular lecture theatre made from rammed earth
Three large classrooms/workspaces/labs and two further smaller seminar rooms
A computer suite
Foyer with games, books and a bar
24 en-suite twin bedrooms, overlooking a large open roof garden and decking
Find out more about our facilities here: https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/msc-sustainability-and-adaptation/sa-site-and-facilities

Hands-on learning

At CAT, hands-on learning takes place side by side with academic study. Residential on-site block learning weeks are taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), a truly unique and inspiring learning environment. Nestled in a disused slate quarry on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park, CAT is a living laboratory for paractical, sustainable solutions. It contains some of the most innovative and renowned environmentally conscious buildings in the country, as well as one of the most diverse range of installed renewable technologies, on site water and sewage treatment, sustainably managed woodland and acres of organic gardens.

Practical building and knowledge sharing

Alongside their design and academic work, students of the Professional Diploma in Architecture also participate in a variety of building projects. This allows them to get practical experience and understanding of the complexities of what happens once their designs leave the architectural studio. During these projects architecture students work alongside MSc students who will go into complimentary building professions allowing for networking and a wealth of transferable knowledge.

Immersive learning environment

Optional residential module weeks include lectures, seminars, group work and practicals. Applied work tends to dominate later in the week once we have laid the theoretical groundwork. These module weeks provide a truly immersive environment to escape daily life and apply yourself to new learning. Many eminent experts give guest lectures or hold seminars during these modules, as it is a course which seeks to draw on the expertise and learning of the whole environmental sector.

Creating high standards of Sustainable Architecture

We pride ourselves on the high standard of work that our graduates continue to produce. To see for yourself, have a look at some of the projects our students produce: https://www.flickr.com/photos/catimages/sets/72157649961496950/

Is this the course for you?

If you would like to visit for a free overnight stay during a module, attend lectures and workshops and meet staff and students, please contact the Student Support Officer:

For more information visit: https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/professional-diploma-in-architecture-part-ii

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The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. Read more
The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. The emphasis of the course is on innovative design work, and on developing a caring and critical approach to the study and practice of architecture.

The course fosters diversity of choice, interpretation and approach, whether in design projects or more academic research. The former focuses on sophisticated design programmes (in formal, technical, professional or urban terms) that demand rigour and self-criticism. The latter focuses on your major dissertation, an extended piece of specialised research into architecture and its historical or theoretical contexts.

The course has three main objectives: to develop your design ability through project-based experimentation; to present an evaluation and critique of your coursework within a broad cultural context, and in light of technical, economic and legal constraints; and to promote the articulate explanation and representation of quality and value in design projects.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.
-DESIGN PROJECT 1 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO)
-DIGITAL REPRESENTATION
-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
-DESIGN PROJECT 2 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO)
-HISTORY AND THEORY
-TECHNICAL STUDIES IN PRACTICE
-DISSERTATION
-MAIN DESIGN PROJECT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO)
-APPLIED TECHNICAL STUDIES
-DESIGN DEVELOPMENT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO)
-STRATEGIC REPORT

Careers

Our dedicated Career Development Centre is actively working with an ever-expanding network of over 3,000 employers to provide you with exceptional employability support and guidance. As a result we were nominated as finalists for a significant industry award – the NUE Awards Most Improved Commitment to Employability 2016.

We provide our students with work placements and international opportunities to support them in becoming highly employable, globally engaged graduates, and with one million businesses operating within 20 miles of the University of Westminster, over 84% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduation. Our graduates work in a variety of sectors and organisations, from small/medium-sized companies and start-ups to large not-for-profit organisations and corporates.

During your time at Westminster you will be able to use our comprehensive online vacancy service and meet with our experienced careers consultants, providing you with thorough training and support on CV writing, application forms, interview preparation and assessment centres.

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Our MSc in Climate Change and Sustainability has been developed around two important principles. 1. the latest academic research from this field, which is used to give you all the necessary knowledge to work on sustainability issues;. Read more

About the Course

Our MSc in Climate Change and Sustainability has been developed around two important principles:

1. the latest academic research from this field, which is used to give you all the necessary knowledge to work on sustainability issues;
2. the skills requirements of employers in the environmental sector, so that you can be sure of your employability.

Whether you want to work in the public, private, charitable or academic sector, our course has the flexibility to give you the focused knowledge and skills that are needed to start, or re-energise, your career.

The programme is based around 5 compulsory modules that provide the essential background to climate change and sustainability. Students then chose 3 optional modules to focus their studies on their particular area of interest e.g. energy, policy and law, environmental management, modelling and data analysis or environmental science. Indeed, our alumni have gone on to work in all these areas.

Aims

We aim to provide students with an interdisciplinary knowledge of the science and potential impacts of climate change across a variety of key areas, including energy, health, business, policy and technology. This is underpinned by a critical understanding of the concept of sustainability as applied to resource and energy use. The course will give you the skills and confidence required to develop creative and evidenced solutions to climate change and sustainability.

In so doing, we aim to meet the changing needs of society by generating graduates able to tackle the challenges presented by climate change, thus preparing them for careers that will span the transition to a post-carbon economy. The course content has been developed in consultation with our alumni, employers and using the findings of national surveys of environmental sector employers (i.e. the NERC Most Wanted Skills survey).

Accreditation

The MSc in Climate Change and Sustainability is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Sciences (IES) and the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM). This entitles students to free student membership of the IES and CIWEM. Our teaching team is NUS Green Impact (Bronze) accredited

Scholarships

For our September intake we have 2 specific scholarship schemes available: the Queen's Anniversary Prize Scholarships provide 6 x £3000 fee waiver scholarships to our best applicants (no additional application is required for these); and the £4000 Water Conservators Bursary is awarded to one student who writes the essay on water and the environment (some years we split the scholarship between 2 exceptional applicants). Brunel Univeristy London also has some scholarship schemes available for applicants to any MSc programme.

Designed to suit your needs

The programme can be taken Full- or Part-time (from 2-days or 1-day contact time per week, respectively, depending on the optional modules chosen) and has a start date in September or January.

Employability

Our alumni have gone on to work in key public and private sector organisations as well as more entrepreneurial pursuits. Employability is a major focus within the university with support for transferable skills, CV and application writing, interview skills and opportunities for internships and work placements.

Course modules

Compulsory modules
* Climate Change: Science and Impacts (15 credits)
* Sustainable Development in Practice (15 credits)
* Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation (15 credits)
* Environment, Health and Societies (15 credits)
* Research and Critical Skills in Environmental Science (15 credits)
* Dissertation (60 credits)

Optional modular blocks

Group A (pick 2)
* Environmental Hazards and Risk (15 credits)
* Environmental Management (15 credits)
* Biosphere (15 credits)
* Environmental Modelling (15 credits)
* Renewable Energy Technologies I - Solar (15 credits) (September start only)
* Renewable Energy Technologies II - Wind, Tidal, Wave, Hydroelectricity (15 credits) (September start only)

Group B (pick 1)
* Clean Technology (15 credits)
* Environmental Law (15 credits)
* GIS and Data Analysis (15 credits)

Students normally choose 2 modules from Group A and 1 module from Group B. (If desired, students are also able to choose “1 module from Group A and 2 modules from Group B” or “3 modules from Group A and no modules from Group B” but must understand that this unbalances the 2 terms: 45:75 or 75:45 credits as opposed to 60:60.)

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The 2-year MA Economics programme is structured to provide an international quality education in Economics and Econometrics for students with an interest in, and aptitude for, Economics but no necessary prior background. Read more
The 2-year MA Economics programme is structured to provide an international quality education in Economics and Econometrics for students with an interest in, and aptitude for, Economics but no necessary prior background. The programme is designed to help the student become a problem solver and therefore enhance their flexibility in the job market. It is a stimulating and challenging degree that aims to provide the student with a wide range of skills demanded by prospective employers. Successful graduates attain economic, quantitative and communication skills that are highly sought by employers in the public and private sectors.

The first year is an intensive and extensive introduction to the world of economics. The aim is that by the year end, students will be at the same level as a graduate of a BA / BBS / BSc graduate in Economics. Students will cover the basic concepts, empirical methods and applications in Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Econometrics as well as choosing field courses of interest from a range of optional modules.

The second year builds upon this and is structured to be stimulating and challenging. It is designed to give graduates the necessary economic and quantitative skills that employers seek today. In the first semester, students take modules in the core areas of Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Econometrics as well as a module in research methods. All modules are a mixture of theory and practical application. In the second semester, students must take Microeconomics II and three field courses. Field courses offered in any year may include, Industrial Organisation, International Trade, Labour Economics, Growth and Development, Financial Economics, International Finance, and Financial Risk Analysis. During this semester, students also develop a thesis proposal under the guidance of their supervisor. The thesis allows the student to undertake independent research and is completed over the summer.

The 2-year MA Economics at Maynooth University is a great opportunity for interested candidates to equip themselves for a career in Economics. Without requiring any background in the subject, students who are ready to make this important investment can expect to earn high returns in their future careers.

Recent graduate have an excellent employment record, both in the public and private sectors. Graduates have taken up research positions at institutions like the Central Bank of Ireland, the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), while others have pursued careers in retail and investment banking, fund management, economic development and economic consultancy firms. The diverse careers of our graduates reflect the adaptability and flexibility of our graduates.

Check out testimonials from our graduates at https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/economics-finance-and-accounting/our-graduates

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The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. Read more
The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. The programs focus on prevailing communication theories, current research findings, and advanced practical techniques. The faculty seeks to educate highly competent, focused students who will be recognized for their leadership qualities: the ability to discern issues both in the practice of their profession and in their role in society; the ability to develop and execute successful communication programs; and the ability to lead others effectively.

Two programs are offered: (1) a two-year thesis program with specialization in advertising or public relations (Plan I), and (2) a one-year professional program combining advertising and public relations (Plan II).

Visit the website https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/

Degree Requirements

- Plan I, the Two-Year Research Program -

The two-year master's degree program is intended for students seeking a strong research emphasis in their study of advertising and public relations. The Plan I program focuses on important problems and questions, gathering evidence, and setting standards for inference. The program specifically prepares students in the areas of (a) mastering the body of scholarly knowledge of advertising and public relations, and (b) contributing to the advancement of knowledge in these fields through basic and applied research. Students may decide to continue their studies, pursuing doctorates in advertising or public relations. Students in the Plan I program specialize in either advertising or public relations, learn the concepts and methods involved in productive scholarship, and collaborate with faculty members in conducting research.

Plan I requirements. Plan I is normally a two-year program and requires (a) a minimum of 30 hours of approved graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion and successful defense of a master's thesis. Students admitted to the program with little or no previous coursework in advertising or public relations may be required to take one or more undergraduate courses in the department to supplement their graduate studies.

Plan II, the One-Year Professional Program

The professional program is an intensive, professionally oriented, one-year program that combines advertising and public relations. Recognizing the increasingly close links between the advertising and public relations professions, the Plan II program provides advanced preparation in both disciplines. The program provides intensive training to meet specific objectives. Graduates will be prepared to:

- develop a thorough understanding of the institutions and processes involved in advertising and public relations, through a combined program of study

- use research both to generate communication strategies and to evaluate the success of communication programs

- write idea-driven persuasive communication

- plan, implement, and evaluate media plans for advertising and public relations programs and campaigns

The Plan II program is for recent college graduates who see the advantages of having advanced skills in advertising and public relations. The students will recognize that preparation in the liberal arts, business administration, or communication has provided them with important knowledge but has not sufficiently prepared them in the communication concepts and skills needed to be a leader.

Speaking and writing skills are emphasized in all courses, with frequent papers and presentations. One course each semester emphasizes writing skills involved in the advertising and public relations professions.

Plan II requirements. The one-year Plan II program requires (a) completion of a specific 33-hour program of graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion of a master's project in the course APR 598 Communication Workshop. Students admitted to the program will receive a list of critical readings and will be expected to become familiar with these materials before beginning the program. The program starts with a series of orientation sessions aimed at evaluating each student's grasp of the critical readings and ability to proceed with the program without further background study.

APR Graduate Course Descriptions

Note: Plan I and Plan II programs have different course requirements.

ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS COURSES

APR 522. Media Planning: Three hours. Development of media objectives, strategies, and budgets and implementation of media plans for advertising and public relations. Each student prepares and presents a media plan.

APR 550. Communication Research Methods: Three hours. A survey of qualitative and quantitative methods in communication research.

APR 551. Seminar in Communication Theory*: Three hours. A study of the development of selected theories of communication as they pertain to interpersonal, public, and mass communication.

APR 570. Contemporary Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. An advanced survey of the academic and professional literature underlying the contemporary practice of advertising and public relations.

APR 572. Persuasive Communication: Three hours. The practice of creating, writing, editing, and producing persuasive communication for advertising and public relations. Writing skills are exercised extensively in this course.

APR 582. Advertising and Public Relations Management: Three hours. Problems and decision-making processes involved in the management of advertising and public relations programs and organizations.

APR 583. Research Applications in Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. Prerequisite: MC 550. Application of research methods and procedures for problem solving and impact assessment in advertising and public relations programs.

APR 590. Visual Communication: Three hours. The practice of developing ideas and creative strategies for professional evaluations about design and its application. Each student prepares a portfolio.

APR 592. Integrated Communication Project. A message-oriented course. Students conceptualize and execute integrated communication programs. Topics vary.

APR 596. Independent Study or Research: One to three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser and instructor.

597. Communication Campaign Workshop I: Three hours. Research to develop an advertising and public relations campaign for a specific organization. This is the preparation stage for the major case study prepared by the student in APR 598.

598. Communication Campaign Workshop II (Master’s Project): Three hours. Development and presentation of a complete advertising and public relations plan and proposal for the specific organization studied in APR 597. Integration of theory, concepts, and techniques in a complete communication program.

599. Thesis Research: Three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser.

Find out how to apply here - https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/applicationadmission/

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Qualifications and durations. - Full-time MA 1 year (includes 3 months to submit dissertation). Languages offered. - Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish. Read more
Qualifications and durations
- Full-time MA 1 year (includes 3 months to submit dissertation)

Languages offered:
- Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish

Pathways

Students may follow one of two possible paths:

- Path 1: allows students with English as their ‘A’ language to offer two other languages - from Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish - working only into English.

- Path 2: allows students to work in both directions between Chinese/English or Russian/English.

Overview

This programme is designed to prepare linguists for careers as professional interpreters and/or translators. It has done this most successfully over more than four decades, and graduates are to be found working in language services throughout the world.

All students follow a core programme involving professional translation and simultaneous, consecutive and public and commercial service interpreting or liaison/public service interpreting. A number of options are available in the second semester to allow students to further focus on their translation or interpreting skills.

The MA is awarded for a 15,000-word dissertation/project submitted after successful completion of the taught programme.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-in-inte-and-tran/

Why study with us?

- Team of highly experienced professional staff
- State of the art digital interpreting suites provide excellent teaching and practice space.
- Small class sizes provide high levels of student and teacher contact.
- Work placements in interpreting and translating are often an option during the programme and provide invaluable practical experience.
- Motivated and multi-national student cohort offers a diverse and stimulating learning environment.
- Students are exposed to realistic training from experienced translation and interpreting trainers which prepares them for work after graduation.
- The University and city of Bath offer ample exposure for non-native students to the English language and culture of the UK.
- A number of funding opportunities are available and students with EU languages are eligible to apply for EU bursaries.

Programme structure

European Stream (French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish):

- Consecutive interpreting (all year core unit)
- Simultaneous interpreting (all year core unit)
- Public speaking (Semester 1 option)
- Professional translation I (Semester 1 core unit)
- Professional translation II (Semester 2 core unit)
- Public service interpreting (Semester 2 option)
- Using technology in the T & I Industry (Semester 2 option)
- Dissertation: 15,000 word thesis: annotated translation or a project type

Chinese Stream

- Consecutive interpreting (all year core unit)
- Simultaneous interpreting (all year core unit)
- Liaison/Public service interpreting (all year core unit)
- Public speaking (Semester 1 option)
- Professional translation I (Semester 1 core unit)
- Professional translation II (Semester 2 option)
- Using technology in the T & I Industry (Semester 2 option)
- Dissertation: 15,000 word thesis: annotated translation or a project type

View programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/pl/pl-proglist-pg.html#G) for further information.

Through our extensive network of contacts, we aim to organise placements for all students with the language services of international organisations, government departments or translation companies.

These placements provide an invaluable insight into the work of professional linguists and are valued highly by employers. They are not however compulsory and are not always guaranteed.

Our students have previously undertaken placements/internships in:
- United Nations (New York, Geneva, and Vienna)
- European Commission and European Parliament
- Council of Europe

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures and intensive translation and interpreting. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes involve closer interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students for intensive training in the Translating & Interpreting discipline with plenty of time for informative discussion.

We also use the software MemoQ for the delivery of the unit, Using Technology in the Translation & Interpreting Industry; this is one of the leading tools in the industry.

Careers

The MA Interpreting & Translating is a highly vocational programme with a worldwide reputation for training professional translators and conference interpreters.

Our graduates have excellent employment prospects. While some have found rewarding jobs in smaller companies and institutions, or chosen to remain as a freelancer, many have gone on to pursue stimulating careers as professional translators and interpreters with major international organisations.

Graduates have worked for the following organisations:

- Institutional markets:

United Nations (Geneva, Vienna and New York)
European Commission (Brussels and Luxembourg)
European Parliament (Brussels and Luxembourg)
Council of Europe (Strasbourg)
International Court of Justice (The Hague)
NATO (Brussels)
Foreign and Commonwealth Office (London)
European Bank (Frankfurt)
BBC World Service (London)

- Private markets:

Microsoft
Talk Finance
Sophos
Prudential
Power Network
Gazprom

Some of our graduates have shared their experiences on our alumni blog (http://blogs.bath.ac.uk/on-parade/category/ma-interpreting-translating/).

About the department

The Department of Politics, Languages & International Studies (PoLIS) is one of the largest departments in the University.

Many staff are leading scholars in their field and are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

International and industrial links:

- Our department has links with 22 Erasmus partner institutions, as well as universities in Russia and Mexico.
- Research students regularly engage in fieldwork abroad, especially in the countries of the European Union, but also in Russia, Latin America and the United States.
- Students on the Euromasters programme study at two or three different sites in either Europe or the USA.
- In the case of the MA Interpreting & Translating and the MA Translation & Professional Language Skills, a number of work placements in Western Europe are made available to students in the language services of international organisations, government departments and commercial enterprises.

Our research

Experts from our department are publishing regularly in the most highly ranked international journals.

Our academic expertise and research activities are organised into three broad Research Clusters:

- Conflict, Security & International Order
- Governance, Citizenship & Policy
- Memory, History & Identity

International collaboration:
Many staff are internationally leading scholars in their field. We are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

Projects are funded by a variety of bodies such as:

- Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC)
- European Commission Framework Programme
- Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

Stimulating cutting edge research:
Our diversity and the disciplinary mix of political science, political theory, policy analysis, social anthropology, political sociology and others make for a very stimulating environment for students to develop their own research projects.

The integration of our research community is further enhanced through the International Relations & European Politics (IREP) postgraduate group.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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We aim to develop a research-led education, where practices of rigorous inquiry permeate every part of what we do. Introduction. The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) RIBA Part II Course is a highly creative, research-led professional two year masters course rooted in Studio Laboratories driven by individual enquiry. Read more
We aim to develop a research-led education, where practices of rigorous inquiry permeate every part of what we do.

Introduction

The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) RIBA Part II Course is a highly creative, research-led professional two year masters course rooted in Studio Laboratories driven by individual enquiry. The M.Arch course is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA, giving exemption from RIBA Part II.

We are based in the heart of the vibrant Faculty of Arts. Founded in 1859 as the School of Art, it offers an inspirational creative context for nurturing excellence in our work. Our distinct research-led approach filters through all aspects of the course, with rigorous inquiry fusing innovation, regulation and social commentary. This student focussed approach offers the opportunity for you to investigate your personal architectural agenda, developing your own critical position and design language prior to entry into the profession.

The Studio Laboratories are driven by tutors’ personal research agendas and all are actively engaged within this field of enquiry as academics or practitioners. The stimulating mix of practitioners and academics across the course builds conversations, with visiting lecturers and critics further feeding the dialogue. Recent visiting lecturers have included Neil Denari, Perry Kulper, Chris Thurlbourne, Michael Jemtrud, and our close links with practice ensure stimulating review panels. We place critical thought at our core and look forward to you joining the conversation.


Professional accreditation
Successful completion of the MArch carries ARB/RIBA Part 2 exemption. In addition, the University of Brighton offers the Management Law and Practice in Architecture postgraduate diploma (Part 3) as the final stage towards the professional title of architect.
As Part 1 exemption is not a prerequisite for Part 2, we are able to accept applications for the MArch programme from students who have a degree in architecture, or a closely related subject, but who do not have a Part 1 qualification. Students in this position are expected to take the Part 1 examination independently. All applicants ultimately seeking to register with the ARB are still required to have satisfied all Parts 1, 2, and 3.

Course structure
The first year in the MArch comprises the main taught input for technology, via precedent studies, lectures, case studies and seminars, and an in-depth research-based history and theory course. The main design project is undertaken in terms 2 and 3, building on research-based design work in term 1, where technology supports design ambitions to satisfy Part 2 criteria. In the second year students are increasingly expected to lead the studio culture with advanced research initiatives and design agendas. Part 2 criteria related to design, professional studies, technology and history and theory are all covered in this year.

Areas of study
Students work on a common, issue-based brief in different tutor groups for the entire academic year. Technology, professional studies and history and theory courses are delivered through lectures, seminars and workshops from academics, practitioners and specialists that support the development of design projects.

Syllabus
Design Studies (with integrated CAD and communication studies)_
Design Technology
Architectural History and Theory
Professional Studies

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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Archival material is unique and irreplaceable; its range infinite and inexhaustible. Often described as the 'documentary heritage' or the 'raw material of history', it has a significant dual role. Read more
Archival material is unique and irreplaceable; its range infinite and inexhaustible. Often described as the 'documentary heritage' or the 'raw material of history', it has a significant dual role: on the one hand it offes a wealth of source material in the context of culture and heritage, supporting popular interest in family and local history and many areas of academic study; on the other it has a significant legal function in providing evidence of past decisions, practices and policies.

By studying archive administration at postgraduate level, you will learn professional principles and techniques and acquire the core skills which will enable you to play a part in the preservation, management and exploitation of an invaluable informational and historical resource.

This course is designed to provide individuals already working in an archive or records management environment, with the training that will equip them with the skills, knowledge and professional qualification to further their career at a professional level.

This professional course is accredited at Diploma and Masters level by the Archives and Records Association (formerly Society of Archivists).

See the website http://courses.aber.ac.uk/postgraduate/archive-administration-distance-learning-masters/

Suitable for

This Degree will suit you:

- If you wish to receive first-rate training in Archive Administration
- If you wish to gain the knowledge and skills needed to enter professional work in Archive Administration
- If you wish to nurture an interest in palaeography and diplomatic.
- If you wish to enter the emerging marketing of Archive Administration and Digital Information Management.

Course detail

Aberystwyth’s Department of Information Studies is the leading provider of distance learning degrees in this subject area. The Department pursues a student centred, flexible, open learning approach which has proved not only popular with our students, but very successful in managing to make studying at a distance as rewarding and enjoyable as possible.

Our distance learning students participate in residential study schools and are supported by web-based conferencing facilities which enable them to communicate with each other – whether consulting about a particular assignment in one of the module conferencing areas, or just enjoying a light hearted exchange at the electronic students café - and with staff, easing the feeling of isolation that can sometimes be felt by distance learners.

The university has a proud tradition of research excellence, as demonstrated in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (2014) assessment. It placed the university in the top 50 institutions for research power and intensity. It submitted 77% of eligible staff and 95% of the university's research was of an internationally recognised standard.

Format

The Diploma/MA in Archive Administration is divided into two parts: Part I (120 credits) is the taught course, successful completion of which reaches Diploma-level. Part II (60 credits) involves writing a dissertation, to be submitted for the Master’s-level qualification.

Tuition is provided through printed study packs containing the core learning material, supplemented by a resource pack and a conference area on Blackboard (the computer conferencing facility), which provides information updates relevant to the course, and a directory of websites referred to in the study packs. Assessment is by means of a variety of written assignments including essays and reports. You can progress at your own pace, taking between two and five years to complete the course. On average, you should expect to spend 10 to 15 hours a week studying.

Students on all courses are required to attend Study Schools in Aberystwyth. For most students this means attending three schools of approximately 4-5 days duration each year. For the rest of the time you will work through specially designed self-study module packs supported by online learning materials.

Assessment

The progamme is assssed on the basis of coursework in part One and the dissertation in Part Two. A variety of assignments in Part One, including reports, essays, presebtations and case studies enable you to relate theoretical knowledge to your own workplace.

Employability

More of our Postgraduate Students (74.1%) entered employment at a graduate level than the national average (72.1%), earning more on average than postgraduates in other subject fields. *2010/11

Every course at Aberystwyth University is designed to enhance your vocational and general employability. This Masters will place you in the jobs market as a highly-trained archive administrator with knowledge and skills in archive management and record and information governance. By balancing the theory and practice you will be provided the professional training which is required for entering the professional archive and records management environment. This course will also equip you with a wide range of general work skills such as research, analysis, writing, presentation and management, ensuring your employability is improved across all areas.

Key Skills and Competencies

Study Skills:
You will develop skills in quickly and accurately assimilating and interpreting data – which you will find invaluable in archive administration and future use. You will develop productive strategies for planning and problem-solving that can be applied beyond your chosen area of study, making you a versatile academic as well as a productive professional. You will also enhance your research skills which you will draw on in both your dissertation and future career.
Study in a Practical Context

The University of Aberystwyth boasts library resources which are amongst the best in Europe. The Department’s specialist Thomas Parry Library is one of the leading libraries for Information Studies. As a student, you will have access to this exceptional resource where you can apply your learning in activities which will convert the purely academic theory into the proven know-how of experience.
In addition to this, you will also have access to the University's Hugh Owen Library which houses more than 700,000 volumes and subscribes to more than 3,500 current periodicals. Also, the National Library for Wales next to the campus is one of the UK's five copyright libraries housing more than 6,000,000 volumes.

- Self-Motivation and Discipline:
Studying at a Postgraduate level requires high levels of discipline and self-motivation. You will have access to the expertise and helpful guidance of departmental staff but you will be ultimately responsible for devising and completing a sustained programme of scholarly research in pursuit of your masters’ degree. This process of independent study at an extremely high level will strengthen your skills as an independent and self-sufficient worker, a trait prized by most employers.

- Transferable Skills:
This Masters programme is designed to equip you with a range of transferable skills that you can apply to a variety of employment contexts. Upon graduation, you will have proven your abilities in structuring and communicating ideas efficiently, writing for and speaking to a range of audiences, evaluating and organizing information, working effectively with others and working within time frames and to specific deadlines. Whether you pursue a career in an archive administration pathway or not, the prestige of your Masters will open doors into workplaces in every industry.

Find out how to apply here https://www.aber.ac.uk/en/postgrad/howtoapply/

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Humber’s Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) graduate certificate program builds confident and knowledgeable teachers who have a full understanding of best practices in teaching English as a second language (ESL). Read more
Humber’s Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) graduate certificate program builds confident and knowledgeable teachers who have a full understanding of best practices in teaching English as a second language (ESL). Our innovative curriculum is based on the latest ESL teaching approaches, methods and assessment systems including the Canadian Language Benchmarks and the Common European Framework Reference (CEFR). You will be exposed to a wide range of theoretical issues including adult second language acquisition, learning theory, linguistics, the emerging field of teaching with technology, and portfolio-based assessment. More importantly, you will have the opportunity to immediately apply this learning through classroom observations, practice teaching and tutoring opportunities in Humber’s Writing Centre.

Faculty members are highly respected, dedicated professionals with graduate credentials in the field and extensive ESL teaching and teacher training experience.

Professional Accreditations

This program is recognized by the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Development and is approved and accredited by TESL Canada (Standard II) and TESL Ontario. Upon completion of the TESL program, graduates who meet TESL Canada and TESL Ontario criteria can apply for professional teacher accreditation from these regulatory bodies.

Course detail

Upon successful completion of the program, a graduate will:

• Develop curriculum and select delivery techniques and materials appropriate to the needs, expectations, motivations and learning styles of diverse cultural adult groups.
• Facilitate the adult ESL learner’s integration or adaptation to Canadian society.
• Develop an introductory, functional philosophy of language utilizing a foundation in general linguistics, socio-linguistics and psycho-linguistics.
• Identify and solve language related problems as they arise in ESL teaching through the application of participant’s own philosophy of language.
• Develop a thorough knowledge of the English language grammar and the knowledge of how to teach grammar, i.e. be able to appropriately select, sequence, plan and deliver instruction to ESL learners.
• Analyze and critique existing ESL methods and resources and their application to the adult ESL classroom.
• Plan adult ESL instructional lessons including the identification of teaching objectives, the selection of techniques and resources and the identification of approaches/methods.
• Apply appropriate ESL techniques to specific classroom situations.
• Diagnose ESL student literacy levels and design and implement the corresponding training plan.
• Analyze and evaluate ESL curricula which address student needs.
• Select and utilize language tests to determine language proficiency and functioning levels.
• Implement and deliver curriculum to adult ESL classes which reflects the analysis and synthesis of theory and practice and which addresses the aims, goals and objectives which impact upon course and program decisions.
• Respond to the need for continuing professional development by participating in a variety of educational and professional activities.

Modules

Semester 1
• TESL 5001: The Adult ESL Learner 1
• TESL 5002: Introduction to Language 1
• TESL 5003: Methodology 1
• TESL 5004: Pedagogical Grammar 1
• TESL 5005: The ESL CLassroom 1
• TESL 5006: Practicum 1

Semester 2
• TESL 5011: The Adult ESL Learner 2
• TESL 5012: Introduction to Language 2
• TESL 5013: Methodology 2
• TESL 5014: Pedagogical Grammar 2
• TESL 5015: The ESL Classroom 2
• TESL 5016: Practicum 2

Work Placement

Students will complete a 50-hour graduated teaching practicum. Unlike many other institutions, our practicum is fully arranged and supervised, giving student teachers the time to focus on their learning and preparation. Students fulfill their practicum requirements in a variety of settings which may include:

• Humber’s English Language Centre in the English for Academic Purposes program
• Humber’s Continuing Education department, enhanced language training (ELT)-related programs
• Adult ESL and Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) classes in the Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board and community agencies.

Your Career

Today, approximately one billion people worldwide are learning English and by 2030, half of the world’s population is expected to speak English. Work in teaching ESL in adult ESL programs in school boards, colleges and universities, and government-sponsored agencies across Ontario, as well as in private schools and academic institutions around the world teaching English as a foreign language. Career opportunities also include workplace ESL, academic ESL and ESL program administration in the public and private sectors.

In addition, each summer, select graduates are hired as ESL teaching interns in Humber’s highly regarded and dynamic international summer language program under the guidance of a mentor faculty member. Work placements may also be available in the Humber English Language Centre’s English for Academic Purposes (EAP) program, in ESL courses in the Continuing Education department and in Humber’s Writing Centre.

How to apply

Click here to apply: http://humber.ca/admissions/how-apply.html

Funding

For information on funding, please use the following link: http://humber.ca/admissions/financial-aid.html

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Financial engineering involves the creation of financial products that are aimed specifically at the needs of investors, rather than the conventional approach of defining assets on the basis of borrowers' requirements. Read more
Financial engineering involves the creation of financial products that are aimed specifically at the needs of investors, rather than the conventional approach of defining assets on the basis of borrowers' requirements. Central to Financial Engineering are relative value (sometimes called arbitrage) trading strategies and the structuring of financial products, and the closely associated process of securitisation. Structuring involves the transformation of cash flows derived from an asset and improving the risk profile of the structured product. The contemporary derivative markets are driven by the process structuring, both in terms of transforming cash flows through “swaps” and credit enhancement through credit derivatives.

The programme aims to develop the skills and knowledge required by the modern investment and asset management industry where relative value trading strategies and structuring dominate. The emphasis is on developing a range of practical skills rather than develop an abstract "theory of everything". This reflects the need for practitioners to be able to employ different techniques in the ever changing world of contemporary finance.

The material is based substantially on the PRIMIA syllabus for risk management and the Actuarial Profession’s Specialist Technical (ST) syllabus to value and manage the risks associated with a portfolios of derivatives.

The taught component of the degree makes up 120 credits. There are seven mandatory courses leading to 75 credits and consisting of:

• Enterprise Risk Management (15 credits, Semesters 1) - a comprehensive treatment of Financial Risk Management focusing on quantitative aspects.

• Derivative Markets and Pricing (15 credits, Semester 1) - an introduction to derivative markets and how derivative products are priced.

• Modelling and Tools (15 credits, Semester 2) - the fundamental techniques of deterministic and probabilistic mathematical modelling.

• Financial Engineering (15 credits, Semester 2) - provides a thorough grounding in the mathematics underpinning Financial Engineering. Topics include non-standard derivatives, securitisation and structuring, modelling interest rates (including Libor Market Models and valuing swaptions) and contemporary issues in asset management (relative value and pairs trading strategies).

• Credit Risk Modelling (15 credits, Semester 2) - a detailed treatment of the mathematics underpinning Basel Accord on banking supervision and Solvency II for insurance.

Students will also choose three of the following five optional courses leading to a further 45 credits

• Statistical Methods (15 credits, Semester 1) - a foundation course in probability and statistics.

• Financial markets (15 credits, Semester 1) - an introduction to the financial markets.

• Time Series Analysis and Financial Econometrics (15 credits, Semester 2) - analysis and modelling of financial data.

• Modern Portfolio Theory (15 credits, Semester 2) - classical portfolio theory based on maximising expected utility

• Bayesian Inference & Computational Methods (15 credits, Semester 2) - a course on modern Bayesian statistical inference and involving implementing the Bayesian approach in practical situations

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The programme is co-organised by Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), offering students the possibility to obtain a double master's degree at the end of the programme. Read more

About the programme

The programme is co-organised by Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), offering students the possibility to obtain a double master's degree at the end of the programme. The first year of courses is taught at the ULB Engineering Campus in Brussels, while the second year is taught at VUB.

The Master of Chemical and Materials Engineering educates students to become innovative engineers who will contribute to their profession and to society. Engineers in chemistry and materials play a unique role in sustainable development, where they must manage resources, energy and the environment in order to develop and produce novel materials and chemical commodities. Our graduates are prepared to face the demands of the modern technological employment field and for an international career with English as their professional language.

Course content

The Master in Chemical and Material Engineering (120 ECTS) offers a solid core of courses in both of these engineering fields. The integrated and the multidisciplinary approach provides students up-to-date knowledge enabling them to propose innovative engineering solutions in numerous modern technological sectors. Students have the possibility to specialize in Process technology or Material Science.

The Master of Chemical and Materials Engineering program consists of two profiles: Process Technology and Materials.

Profile: Process Technology:
The Process Technology orientation trains students to become engineers who are employable and innovative both in production units (operation and optimization of production facilities) and in engineering groups (develop new production units that meet desired performance specifications). An emphasis is placed on the biotechnology and food industries. Students are also trained to identify, solve and avoid environmental problems including waste management, water, air and soil pollution.

Profile: Materials:
The Materials orientation prepares students for the materials and materials technology sectors (metals, polymers, ceramics and composites). Students are trained to become creative engineers capable of designing sustainable multi-functional materials which meet specific applications. Students also have the capacity to contribute to the whole life-cycle of materials from their processing into semi or full end products using environmentally friendly and safe production processes to their recycling.

Become a skilled scientific engineer

This Master offers:
- a unique interdisciplinary programme which prepares you for employment in a professional field related to chemical engineering, materials or environmental technology.
- a high level scientific education that prepares you to a wide range of job profiles.
- the possibility to work in close contact with professors who are internationally recognized in their own disciplines and favor interactive learning.

Curriculum

http://www.vub.ac.be/en/study/chemical-and-materials-engineering/programme

The programme is built up modularly:
1) the Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering (56 ECTS)
2) the Specific Profile Courses (30 ECTS)
3) the master thesis (24 ECTS)
4) electives (10 ECTS) from 1 out of 3 options.
Each of the modules should be succesfully completed to obtain the master degree. The student must respect the specified registration requirements. The educational board strongly suggests the student to follow the standard learning track. Only this model track can guarantee a timeschedule without overlaps of the compulsory course units.

Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering:
The Common Core Chemical and Materials Engineering (56 ECTS) is spread over 2 years: 46 ECTS in the first and 10 ECTS in the second year. The Common Core emphasizes the interaction between process- and materials technology by a chemical (molecular) approach. The Common Core consists out of courses related to chemistry, process technology and materials and is the basis for the Process Technology and the Materials profiles.

Specific Courses Profile Materials:
The profile 'Materials' (30 ECTS) consists out of 2 parts, spread over the 1st and the 2nd year of the model learning track: Materials I - 14 ECTS in MA1 and Materials II - 16 ECTS in MA2. The profile adds material-technological courses to the common core.

Specific Courses Profile Process Technology:
The profile 'Process Technology' (30 ECTS) consists out of 2 parts, spread over the 1st and the 2nd year of the model learning track: Process Technology I - 14 ECTS in MA1 and Process Technology II - 16 ECTS in MA2. The profile adds process technological courses to the common core.

Elective Courses:
The elective courses are divided into 3 options:
- Option 1: Internship (10 ECTS)
- Option 2: Elective courses (incl. internship of 6 ECTS)
- Option 3: Entrepreneurship
The student has to select one option and at least 10 ECTS within that option. All options belong to the 2nd year of the model learning track.

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Electrical and Electronic Engineering is characterised by the need for continuing education and training. Today, most Electrical and Electronic Engineers require more than is delivered in a conventional four-year undergraduate programme. Read more
Electrical and Electronic Engineering is characterised by the need for continuing education and training. Today, most Electrical and Electronic Engineers require more than is delivered in a conventional four-year undergraduate programme. The aim of the MEngSc (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) programme is to provide advanced coursework with options for a research element or industrial element, and additional professional development coursework. Students choose from a range of courses in Analogue, Mixed Signal, and RF Integrated Circuit Design, VLSI Architectures, Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks, Wireless Communications, Robotics and Mechatronics, Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives, Optoelectronics, Adaptive Signal Processing and Advanced Control. A range of electives for the coursework-only stream includes modules in Computer Architecture, Biomedical Design, Microsystems, Nanoelectronics, Innovation, Commercialisation, and Entrepreneurship

Visit the website: http://www.ucc.ie/en/ckr47/

Course Details

The MEngSc (EEE) has three Streams which include coursework only, coursework with a research project, or coursework with an industrial placement. Students following Stream 1 take course modules to the value of 60 credits and carry out a Minor Research Project to the value of 30 credits. Students following Stream 2 take course modules to the value of 60 credits and carry out an Industrial Placement to the value of 30 credits. Students following Stream 3 take course modules to the value of 90 credits, up to 20 credits of which can be in topics such as business, law, and innovation.

Format

In all Streams, students take five core modules from the following range of courses: Advanced Analogue and Mixed Signal Integrated Circuit Design, Advanced RF Integrated Circuit Design, Advanced VLSI Architectures, Intelligent Sensors and Wireless Sensor Networks, Wireless Communications, Robotics and Mechatronics, Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Drives, Optoelectronics, and Adaptive Signal Processing and Advanced Control. In addition, students following Stream 1 (Research Project) and Stream 2 (Industry Placement) carry out a Research Report. Following successful completion of the coursework and Research Report, students in Streams 1 and 2 carry out a research project or industry placement over the summer months.

Students who choose the coursework-only option, Stream 3, take additional courses in lieu of the project or placement. These can be chosen from a range of electives that includes modules in Computer Architecture, Biomedical Design, Microsystems, Nanoelectronics, Innovation, Commercialisation, and Entrepreneurship.

Assessment

Part I consists of coursework modules and mini-project to the value of 60 credits. These are assessed using a combination of written examinations and continuous assessment. Successful completion of the initial tranche of coursework modules qualifies the student to progress to Part II, the research project, industrial placement, or additional coursework to the value of 30 credits in the cases of Streams 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

Placement and Study Abroad Information

For students following Streams 1 and 2, research projects and industrial placements are normally in Ireland. Where the opportunity arises, a research project or work placement may be carried out outside Ireland.

Careers

MEngSc (Electrical and Electronic Engineering) graduates will have a competitive advantage in the jobs market by virtue of having completed advanced coursework in Electrical and Electronic Engineering and, in the case of Streams 1 and 2, having completed a significant research project or work placement.

How to apply: http://www.ucc.ie/en/study/postgrad/how/

Funding and Scholarships

Information regarding funding and available scholarships can be found here: https://www.ucc.ie/en/cblgradschool/current/fundingandfinance/fundingscholarships/

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The MSc in Economics at the University of Barcelona (UB) is a high quality Master Program intended to train and educate economists to undertake top research in one of the best places to study worldwide. Read more
The MSc in Economics at the University of Barcelona (UB) is a high quality Master Program intended to train and educate economists to undertake top research in one of the best places to study worldwide.

The MSc in Economics at UB is the perfect program for new graduated students to develop their research skills through a broad selection of courses entirely taught in English by our top researchers. Since this is a two-year Master, you will have the chance to get very solid methodological foundations and get specialized in some areas of interest at the same time.

On successfully completing this course, students can expect to find employment in a broad range of sectors, including higher education and economic consultancy. The strongest candidates are encouraged to undertake advanced research on the PhD Programme.

Who should apply

YOU MIGHT BE INTERESTED ON APPLYING IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR

‌•Solid foundations to initiate independent research in economics.
‌•A wide range of advanced tools in the analysis and resolution of complex economic problems.
‌•Improvement on your skills to evaluate the effects of economic policies.
‌•Improvement on your decision making, leadership and teamwork skills.
‌•Better understanding and research communication skills.
‌•A programme that enables you to pursue a PhD programme.

Programme Overview

During the 1st and 2nd terms, students study a number of core subjects (40 credits) including Mathematical Economics, Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, and Econometrics.

In the 3rd, 4th and 5th terms, students have to choose two options from the list below according to their specialization subjects choice (60 credits), enabling them to specialise in areas of interest for their future profession or research. The areas offered are:

‌•Public Economics
‌•Regional and Urban Economics
‌•Growth and Trade
‌•Government and Markets
‌•Games, Behaviour and Incentives

At the end of the course, in the 6th term, students must plan and write a dissertation (20 credits) in a subject of interest to them, employing the concepts and methods acquired during the course.

Introductory/Complementary course:

‌•Introduction to Economics

FIRST QUARTER –Compulsory Courses (20 ECTS):

‌•Mathematics
‌•Microeconomics
‌•Macroeconomics
‌•Econometrics

SECOND QUARTER – Compulsory Courses (20 ECTS):

‌•Mathematics II
‌•Microeconomics II
‌•Macroeconomics II
‌•Econometrics II


For a full syllabus outline and to view elective courses, please follow this link http://www.ub.edu/ubeconomics/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/MSc-in-Economics-Syllabus-Outline-2016-2017.pdf

Student Exchange

This Master in Economics degree offers to second-year students the chance to take up ERASMUS mobility placements at world-class universities:

‌•Toulouse School of Economics (France) http://www.ub.edu/ubeconomics/master-in-economics/%20http://www.tse-fr.eu
‌•University of Copenhagen (Denmark) http://www.ku.dk/english/
‌•University of Helsinki (Finland) https://www.helsinki.fi/en
‌•Aix-Marseille School of Economics (France) http://www.amse-aixmarseille.fr/en/teaching/graduate-studies

[[Fees]

The MSc in Economics is a two years Master. Students need to obtain a total of 120 credits ECTS (60 per year) to be awarded the MSc in Economics.

The credit ECTS price (*) for academic year 2016/2017 is 46’50 eur/credit for European students (and 65,87 eur/credit for non-European students). It means that the total amount for the 2-year master degree (120 credits ECTS) will be: European students: 5.580 eur Non-European students: 7.904,4 eur.

On the first year enrolment, the student will only have to afford the first 60 credits payment (European students 2.790 eur and Non-European students 3.952,2 eur).

In addition, students with an international degree have to pay 218,15€ when they apply for admission in the programme.

(*) Student’s fees for university master’s degrees are decreed on an annual basis by the Catalan government and Universitat de Barcelona.

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