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The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law. Read more

About the course

The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law.

The LLM in International Commercial Law provides a flexible route for students to focus on areas of their own interest and further explore commercial law in both the European and wider international contexts.

Our wide choice of elective modules enables students to tailor the programme to their specific needs, selecting the areas of commercial law in which they wish to specialise.

On completing the programme graduates will be able to critically analyse legal concepts as well as practical scenarios. Such knowledge is increasingly sought by law firms, businesses and government bodies all over the world in response to the expansion of international trade, commerce and international regulation, resulting from economic, political and technological change.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will gain knowledge and understanding to confidently tackle areas of controversy in the area of international commercial law

You will be able to assess critically situations and challenges, appreciate the importance of the international boundaries, and the influence of culture on the processes of law.

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of commercial, competition, trade law and financial regulations.

You will gain critical and analytical skills in this complex international field.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on both corporate law and the financial regulations in place.

You will develop the professional skills required to develop a career in commercial law, law practice and the academia.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:
(modules are subject to withdrawal at the School's discretion)

Term I

EU Competition Law 1 or 2
Corporate Law I 1 or 2
Corporate Law II 1 or 2
Theory of International Finance Regulation 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation Law 1 or 2
Privacy and Data Protection 1 or 2
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration 1 or 2
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law 1 - Substantive Legal Issue 1 or 2

Term II

International Trade Law 1 or 2
International Environmental Law 1 or 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Socail Responsibility 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law 1 or 2
Practice of International Financial Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law II - Resolving internet-related Legal Issue or Disputes 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allie Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration1 or 2
International Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

*The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

We promote a personalised learning experience that considers your interests, needs and abilities. This course is delivered through a combination of lectures which introduce you to new subjects and provide an overview of subject matter, and seminars that allow these topics to be investigated in more detail. There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over each of the teaching terms, and classes are taught in groups of approximately 30 students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible start times and learning options
The programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. You will have greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, whihc enables you to choose from a range of options to tailor your studies.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. The Law School is particularly proud of its diverse events programme, which students are encouraged to actively participate in to support their learning.
Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.
Brunel Law School is highly rated for it published scholarship, and recognised amongst law firms for its distinctive courses. The school has considerable expertise in various aspects of commercial law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

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The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property. Read more

About the course

The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property.

The programme provides students with extensive knowledge on the fundamentals of intellectual property, as well as the opportunity to develop specialised skills through a wide range of elective modules, covering both policy and practical technology-related issues.

Intellectual property, especially at international level, is a fast-growing area of law largely due to the impact of technology. The widespread use of the Internet and other cross-border communications and commercial technologies has led to a comprehensive and complex legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU). With the undisputed relevance of intellectual property in innovation and access to knowledge, the demand for structured study of the area has increased.

The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law keeps ahead of the 'curve' in thinking in this area, due to our highly active Intellectual Property research centre, which in addition to providing direction and support to students’ study, regularly hosts seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of intellectual property law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of intellectual property law.

You will be able to produce original research, apply knowledge and demonstrate practical and critical understanding

You will gain valuable professional skills required to develop a successful career.

You will be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU).

This Master's course is designed for graduates from anywhere in the world who wish to develop a specialist knowledge on intellectual property law and related areas.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I
Philosophical Foundations of IP 1

Term II
International Intellectual Property Law 1

PLUS, EITHER

Term I
Patent Law and Practice 1

OR

Term II
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1

Optional modules:

Term I

EU Competition Law 2
Privacy and Data Protection 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law I - Substantive Legal Issues 2
Patent Law and Practice 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)

Term II

Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes 1 or 2
International Commercial Litigation 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 2

* The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience.

In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions. On average there are 16 hours of teaching per credit module, delivered through a combination of teaching methods.

This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Intellectual Property Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in internet law, copyright, patents and competition law.

Assessment

For each module you will be assessed twice, first by way of a written essay and then by way of a "seen" or "pre-release" examination, where the question paper is released a short time before the day of the exam.

Each assessment is worth 50% of the overall mark.

Special Features

Intellectual Property Law at Brunel University is a well-established area of teaching and research. It is highly rated for the quality of its staff publications, research projects and teaching standard.

Lecturers at the International Intellectual Property Law LLM include academics and practitioners with recognised expertise in all areas of intellectual property law.

Flexible start times and learning options
The course is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, which provides its students a range of options to tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.
The Law School is equally particularly proud of its various events that are offered on Intellectual Property, there is a diverse programme which supports the learning of our students and LLM students will be expected to actively participate.
At Brunel Law School we believe that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework
(REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies, research workshops, and study visits. All students are expected to play a leading role in participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the University’s award winning Professional Development Centre which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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As the European Union has developed into new policy areas, EU law has grown in significance. The LLM in European Law offers students the opportunity to gain a detailed knowledge of EU law in a range of fields. Read more
As the European Union has developed into new policy areas, EU law has grown in significance. The LLM in European Law offers students the opportunity to gain a detailed knowledge of EU law in a range of fields. These include constitutional law, the law relating to the single market, competition law, environmental law, employment law, the law on migration, and human rights law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of European Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM100 EU Immigration Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM101 EU Criminal Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM106 EU Constitutional Law I - Concepts, Values and Principles (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM107 EU Constitutional Law II - Governance (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM122 European Union Tax Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM190 EU Healthcare law: Rights, Policies and Instruments (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM193 Free Movement of Persons in the European Union (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM311 Policing in Local and Global Contexts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM312 Comparative Criminal Justice (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM317 Competition and the State: EU State Aid Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM318 Competition and the State: Regulation of public services in the EU (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM326 The Law of the European Convention on Human Rights (sem 1)
◦ QLLM327 European Union Human Rights Law (Sem 2) (Not Running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM346 EU Copyright Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM353 EU Data Protection Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)

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The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation of the growing discipline of financial regulations and corporate law in the international context. Read more

About the course

The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation of the growing discipline of financial regulations and corporate law in the international context.

The programme focusses on the conceptual and theoretical aspects of substantive law and regulation in the field; the procedural mechanisms for the application of law; the challenges faced with the evolution of principles, rules and procedures; and the wider impact that regulations have on the wider society.

Beyond the conceptual and theoretical focus, the course also covers the practical aspects of financial regulation in domestic and international context. Brunel is one of the only law schools in the UK to offer this innovative programme.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in financial services industry, law practice and the academia or continue into research.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of corporate law and financial regulations.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in this complex international field.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on both corporate law and the financial regulations in place.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a successful career in financial services industry, law practice and the academia.

The International Financial Regulations and Corporate Law programme provides students with the knowledge and understanding to confidently tackle areas of controversy in these areas of law, to be able to assess critically situations and challenges, appreciate the importance of the international boundaries, and the influence of culture on the processes of law.

The programme is designed to give as much flexibility as possible, in order to provide students to tailor their learning to their interests.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

Theory of International Financial Regulation (15 credits)1
Corporate Law I (15 credits) 1
Corporate Law II (15 credits) 2

Term II
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 1
Practice of International Financial Regulation (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I
EU Competition Law (15 credits) 2
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) Law (15 credits) 2
Privacy and Data Protection (15 credits) 2

Term II
International Trade Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration (15 credits) 2

The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Dissertation

From the end of February, students will work on a 15,000 word dissertation on a topic in the field of their study. The dissertation is due at the end of the summer. This will provide students with an opportunity to deepen their understanding of a particular area of interest. The dissertation has a value of 60 credits.

Teaching

We promote a personalised learning experience that considers your interests, needs and abilities. This course is delivered through a combination of lectures which introduce you to new subjects and provide an overview of subject matter, and seminars that allow these topics to be investigated in more detail. There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over each of the teaching terms, and classes are taught in groups of approximately 30 students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings, as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible start times and learning options
Programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offer smaller 15 credit modules, which provides students a range of options to both tailor study and have additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host seminars and workshops, which help to support students' learning.
Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights, and it is important to us that all staff are included in our Research Assessment’s (RAE). In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers a comprehenseive scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

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The Master of Architecture (MArch) RIBA Part II course is a highly creative, research-led and professional two-year masters rooted in studio laboratories and driven by individual enquiry. Read more
The Master of Architecture (MArch) RIBA Part II course is a highly creative, research-led and professional two-year masters rooted in studio laboratories and driven by individual enquiry. The MArch course is prescribed by the ARB and validated by RIBA, giving exemption from RIBA Part II.

We are part of the vibrant range of arts and humanities courses that the university has to offer. Our distinct research-led approach filters through all aspects of this course, with rigorous inquiry fusing innovation, regulation and social commentary. This student-focused approach offers the opportunity for you to investigate your personal architectural agenda, developing your own critical position and design language prior to entry into the profession.

The studio laboratories are driven by tutors’ personal research agendas and all staff are actively engaged within this field of enquiry as academics or practitioners. The stimulating mix of practitioners and academics across the course builds conversations, with visiting lecturers and critics further feeding the dialogue. Recent visiting lecturers have included Neil Denari, Perry Kulper, Chris Thurlbourne, Michael Jemtrud, and our close links with practice ensure stimulating review panels. We place critical thought at our core and look forward to you joining the conversation.

Course structure

We want you to emerge from the course as an assured designer, confident in your approach, ideals and aspirations and with the ability to communicate this to the wider world. Over the two years you will be challenged to define your own critical position, and evolve your personal language of design and representation. The course will assist you in this through a gradual deepening of understanding, and by providing you with the tools with which to critically reflect upon design strategies and to navigate the wider contemporary debate on architecture.

The design laboratories form the backbone to the course. The other individual elements of the course increasingly intertwine with this over the two years to provide a final systematic understanding of architecture as a holistic entity.

Year 1: Strategy

There are four elements of the course (modules) covered in the first year and these are organised such that you will only ever address two at any one time. Design forms the backbone of the year and is divided into two elements that run consecutively across the whole year. The third element, or module, is technology and this runs through the first half of the year and is then replaced by Humanities and Design Theory in the second half of the year.

Year 2: Integration

Year two is also formed of four elements (modules). Design encompasses the whole year in the form of the master thesis, with the technology and professional studies elements of the course plugging into this as the year progresses. Architectural humanities runs in the first term in the form of the Humanities Research Project. Once this is completed technology then takes its place in the course diagram and runs through to the end of the year integrating itself into the design proposal.

Teaching

The course is centred around the studio and through this aims to reflect the nature of architectural practice. Teaching is rooted in problem-based learning, such as through critical studio briefs, and a research-based approach to problem solving. You will therefore be asked to critically engage with and reflect upon the subject matter, and to learn through your own research and enquiry. One-to-one tutorials, group discussions, seminars as well as lectures by academic staff and visiting practitioners all act to assist in evolving your ideas.

The studio laboratories are derived from the tutors’ own field of enquiry as academics or practitioners. You are given the opportunity to apply for the studio laboratory of your choice at the start of each academic year.

Studios

There are a range of studio laboratories to choose from each year, all of which explore different contemporary design research fields informed by the studio tutors’ current research. Each studio laboratory is supported by two tutors and has a dedicated studio space within which to conduct your explorations alongside fellow students from both years of the course. Find out more:

https://www.brighton.ac.uk/courses/study/architecture-riba-part-2-march.aspx

Careers and employability

On successful completion of the course you will have formed a systematic understanding of architecture, a critical awareness of current problems and a comprehensive understanding of techniques, methodologies and practice. This rigorous and critically engaged basis will form a solid foundation upon which to build your professional architectural career.

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The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. Read more
The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. The emphasis of the course is on innovative design work, and on developing a caring and critical approach to the study and practice of architecture.

The course fosters diversity of choice, interpretation and approach, whether in design projects or more academic research. The former focuses on sophisticated design programmes (in formal, technical, professional or urban terms) that demand rigour and self-criticism. The latter focuses on your major dissertation, an extended piece of specialised research into architecture and its historical or theoretical contexts.

The course has three main objectives: to develop your design ability through project-based experimentation; to present an evaluation and critique of your coursework within a broad cultural context, and in light of technical, economic and legal constraints; and to promote the articulate explanation and representation of quality and value in design projects.

Modules

The following modules are indicative of what you will study on this course.
-DESIGN PROJECT 1 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO)
-DIGITAL REPRESENTATION
-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES
-DESIGN PROJECT 2 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO)
-HISTORY AND THEORY
-TECHNICAL STUDIES IN PRACTICE
-DISSERTATION
-MAIN DESIGN PROJECT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO)
-APPLIED TECHNICAL STUDIES
-DESIGN DEVELOPMENT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO)
-STRATEGIC REPORT

Careers

Our dedicated Career Development Centre is actively working with an ever-expanding network of over 3,000 employers to provide you with exceptional employability support and guidance. As a result we were nominated as finalists for a significant industry award – the NUE Awards Most Improved Commitment to Employability 2016.

We provide our students with work placements and international opportunities to support them in becoming highly employable, globally engaged graduates, and with one million businesses operating within 20 miles of the University of Westminster, over 84% of our students are in work or further study six months after graduation. Our graduates work in a variety of sectors and organisations, from small/medium-sized companies and start-ups to large not-for-profit organisations and corporates.

During your time at Westminster you will be able to use our comprehensive online vacancy service and meet with our experienced careers consultants, providing you with thorough training and support on CV writing, application forms, interview preparation and assessment centres.

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The 2-year MA Economics programme is structured to provide an international quality education in Economics and Econometrics for students with an interest in, and aptitude for, Economics but no necessary prior background. Read more

Overview

The 2-year MA Economics programme is structured to provide an international quality education in Economics and Econometrics for students with an interest in, and aptitude for, Economics but no necessary prior background. The programme is designed to help the student become a problem solver and therefore enhance their flexibility in the job market. It is a stimulating and challenging degree that aims to provide the student with a wide range of skills demanded by prospective employers. Successful graduates attain economic, quantitative and communication skills that are highly sought by employers in the public and private sectors.

Course Structure

The first year is an intensive and extensive introduction to the world of economics. The aim is that by the year end, students will be at the same level as a graduate of a BA / BBS / BSc graduate in Economics. Students will cover the basic concepts, empirical methods and applications in Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Econometrics as well as choosing field courses of interest from a range of optional modules.

The second year builds upon this and is structured to be stimulating and challenging. It is designed to give graduates the necessary economic and quantitative skills that employers seek today. In the first semester, students take modules in the core areas of Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Econometrics as well as a module in research methods. All modules are a mixture of theory and practical application. In the second semester, students must take Microeconomics II and three field courses. Field courses offered in any year may include, Industrial Organisation, International Trade, Labour Economics, Growth and Development, Financial Economics, International Finance, and Financial Risk Analysis. During this semester, students also develop a thesis proposal under the guidance of their supervisor. The thesis allows the student to undertake independent research and is completed over the summer.

Career Options

The 2-year MA Economics at Maynooth University is a great opportunity for interested candidates to equip themselves for a career in Economics. Without requiring any background in the subject, students who are ready to make this important investment can expect to earn high returns in their future careers.

Recent graduate have an excellent employment record, both in the public and private sectors. Graduates have taken up research positions at institutions like the Central Bank of Ireland, the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), while others have pursued careers in retail and investment banking, fund management, economic development and economic consultancy firms. The diverse careers of our graduates reflect the adaptability and flexibility of our graduates.

Check out testimonials from our graduates at https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/economics-finance-and-accounting/our-graduates

How To Apply

Online application only http://www.pac.ie/maynoothuniversity

PAC code
MHH70

The following information should be forwarded to PAC, 1 Courthouse Square, Galway or uploaded to your online application form:

Certified copies of all official transcripts of results for all non-Maynooth University qualifications listed MUST accompany the application. Failure to do so will delay your application being processed. Non-Maynooth University students are asked to provide two academic references and a copy of birth certificate or valid passport.

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. Read more
The master of arts programs in advertising and public relations are intended for those who wish to acquire advanced understanding of and skills in the development of highly effective persuasive communication. The programs focus on prevailing communication theories, current research findings, and advanced practical techniques. The faculty seeks to educate highly competent, focused students who will be recognized for their leadership qualities: the ability to discern issues both in the practice of their profession and in their role in society; the ability to develop and execute successful communication programs; and the ability to lead others effectively.

Two programs are offered: (1) a two-year thesis program with specialization in advertising or public relations (Plan I), and (2) a one-year professional program combining advertising and public relations (Plan II).

Visit the website https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/

Degree Requirements

- Plan I, the Two-Year Research Program -

The two-year master's degree program is intended for students seeking a strong research emphasis in their study of advertising and public relations. The Plan I program focuses on important problems and questions, gathering evidence, and setting standards for inference. The program specifically prepares students in the areas of (a) mastering the body of scholarly knowledge of advertising and public relations, and (b) contributing to the advancement of knowledge in these fields through basic and applied research. Students may decide to continue their studies, pursuing doctorates in advertising or public relations. Students in the Plan I program specialize in either advertising or public relations, learn the concepts and methods involved in productive scholarship, and collaborate with faculty members in conducting research.

Plan I requirements. Plan I is normally a two-year program and requires (a) a minimum of 30 hours of approved graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion and successful defense of a master's thesis. Students admitted to the program with little or no previous coursework in advertising or public relations may be required to take one or more undergraduate courses in the department to supplement their graduate studies.

Plan II, the One-Year Professional Program

The professional program is an intensive, professionally oriented, one-year program that combines advertising and public relations. Recognizing the increasingly close links between the advertising and public relations professions, the Plan II program provides advanced preparation in both disciplines. The program provides intensive training to meet specific objectives. Graduates will be prepared to:

- develop a thorough understanding of the institutions and processes involved in advertising and public relations, through a combined program of study

- use research both to generate communication strategies and to evaluate the success of communication programs

- write idea-driven persuasive communication

- plan, implement, and evaluate media plans for advertising and public relations programs and campaigns

The Plan II program is for recent college graduates who see the advantages of having advanced skills in advertising and public relations. The students will recognize that preparation in the liberal arts, business administration, or communication has provided them with important knowledge but has not sufficiently prepared them in the communication concepts and skills needed to be a leader.

Speaking and writing skills are emphasized in all courses, with frequent papers and presentations. One course each semester emphasizes writing skills involved in the advertising and public relations professions.

Plan II requirements. The one-year Plan II program requires (a) completion of a specific 33-hour program of graduate courses, (b) demonstration of proficiency in research skills, (c) passing of a comprehensive written examination, and (d) completion of a master's project in the course APR 598 Communication Workshop. Students admitted to the program will receive a list of critical readings and will be expected to become familiar with these materials before beginning the program. The program starts with a series of orientation sessions aimed at evaluating each student's grasp of the critical readings and ability to proceed with the program without further background study.

APR Graduate Course Descriptions

Note: Plan I and Plan II programs have different course requirements.

ADVERTISING & PUBLIC RELATIONS COURSES

APR 522. Media Planning: Three hours. Development of media objectives, strategies, and budgets and implementation of media plans for advertising and public relations. Each student prepares and presents a media plan.

APR 550. Communication Research Methods: Three hours. A survey of qualitative and quantitative methods in communication research.

APR 551. Seminar in Communication Theory*: Three hours. A study of the development of selected theories of communication as they pertain to interpersonal, public, and mass communication.

APR 570. Contemporary Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. An advanced survey of the academic and professional literature underlying the contemporary practice of advertising and public relations.

APR 572. Persuasive Communication: Three hours. The practice of creating, writing, editing, and producing persuasive communication for advertising and public relations. Writing skills are exercised extensively in this course.

APR 582. Advertising and Public Relations Management: Three hours. Problems and decision-making processes involved in the management of advertising and public relations programs and organizations.

APR 583. Research Applications in Advertising and Public Relations: Three hours. Prerequisite: MC 550. Application of research methods and procedures for problem solving and impact assessment in advertising and public relations programs.

APR 590. Visual Communication: Three hours. The practice of developing ideas and creative strategies for professional evaluations about design and its application. Each student prepares a portfolio.

APR 592. Integrated Communication Project. A message-oriented course. Students conceptualize and execute integrated communication programs. Topics vary.

APR 596. Independent Study or Research: One to three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser and instructor.

597. Communication Campaign Workshop I: Three hours. Research to develop an advertising and public relations campaign for a specific organization. This is the preparation stage for the major case study prepared by the student in APR 598.

598. Communication Campaign Workshop II (Master’s Project): Three hours. Development and presentation of a complete advertising and public relations plan and proposal for the specific organization studied in APR 597. Integration of theory, concepts, and techniques in a complete communication program.

599. Thesis Research: Three hours. Prerequisite: consent of the academic adviser.

Find out how to apply here - https://apr.ua.edu/gradinfo/applicationadmission/

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The Master of Music in Music Education (Kodaly Methodology Option) is designed to provide certification in Kodaly Methodology as recommended by the Organization of American Kodaly Educators. Read more
The Master of Music in Music Education (Kodaly Methodology Option) is designed to provide certification in Kodaly Methodology as recommended by the Organization of American Kodaly Educators. To complete requirements for the degree and AOSA certification requires an eighteen (18) credit hour concentration:

• Level I: MUE 560 (2) Musicianship Training, MUE 561 (2) Methodology
• Level II: MUE 562 (2) Musicianship Training, MUE 563 () Methodology
• Level III: MUE 564 (2) Musicianship Training, MUE 565 (2) Methodology

Additional Courses: MUE 566 (2) Kodaly Conducting, MUE 567 (2) Kodaly Folk Song Analysis, MUE 568 (2) Kodaly Games and Materials, MUE 569 (1) Kodaly Final Project

All students in M.M. programs in music education also must complete a comprehensive exit examination.  Students not holding Level I Certification in music education must complete prerequisite undergraduate work prior to admission into a graduate program that requires Level I Certification.

For more information about the course curriculum, please visit the website:

http://catalog.wcupa.edu/graduate/school-of-music/music-education/music-education-mm-kodaly-concentration/

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Qualifications and durations. - Full-time MA 1 year (includes 3 months to submit dissertation). Languages offered. - Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish. Read more
Qualifications and durations
- Full-time MA 1 year (includes 3 months to submit dissertation)

Languages offered:
- Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish

Pathways

Students may follow one of two possible paths:

- Path 1: allows students with English as their ‘A’ language to offer two other languages - from Chinese, French, German, Italian, Russian and Spanish - working only into English.

- Path 2: allows students to work in both directions between Chinese/English or Russian/English.

Overview

This programme is designed to prepare linguists for careers as professional interpreters and/or translators. It has done this most successfully over more than four decades, and graduates are to be found working in language services throughout the world.

All students follow a core programme involving professional translation and simultaneous, consecutive and public and commercial service interpreting or liaison/public service interpreting. A number of options are available in the second semester to allow students to further focus on their translation or interpreting skills.

The MA is awarded for a 15,000-word dissertation/project submitted after successful completion of the taught programme.

Visit the website http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/programmes/ma-in-inte-and-tran/

Why study with us?

- Team of highly experienced professional staff
- State of the art digital interpreting suites provide excellent teaching and practice space.
- Small class sizes provide high levels of student and teacher contact.
- Work placements in interpreting and translating are often an option during the programme and provide invaluable practical experience.
- Motivated and multi-national student cohort offers a diverse and stimulating learning environment.
- Students are exposed to realistic training from experienced translation and interpreting trainers which prepares them for work after graduation.
- The University and city of Bath offer ample exposure for non-native students to the English language and culture of the UK.
- A number of funding opportunities are available and students with EU languages are eligible to apply for EU bursaries.

Programme structure

European Stream (French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish):

- Consecutive interpreting (all year core unit)
- Simultaneous interpreting (all year core unit)
- Public speaking (Semester 1 option)
- Professional translation I (Semester 1 core unit)
- Professional translation II (Semester 2 core unit)
- Public service interpreting (Semester 2 option)
- Using technology in the T & I Industry (Semester 2 option)
- Dissertation: 15,000 word thesis: annotated translation or a project type

Chinese Stream

- Consecutive interpreting (all year core unit)
- Simultaneous interpreting (all year core unit)
- Liaison/Public service interpreting (all year core unit)
- Public speaking (Semester 1 option)
- Professional translation I (Semester 1 core unit)
- Professional translation II (Semester 2 option)
- Using technology in the T & I Industry (Semester 2 option)
- Dissertation: 15,000 word thesis: annotated translation or a project type

View programme catalogue (http://www.bath.ac.uk/catalogues/2015-2016/pl/pl-proglist-pg.html#G) for further information.

Through our extensive network of contacts, we aim to organise placements for all students with the language services of international organisations, government departments or translation companies.

These placements provide an invaluable insight into the work of professional linguists and are valued highly by employers. They are not however compulsory and are not always guaranteed.

Our students have previously undertaken placements/internships in:
- United Nations (New York, Geneva, and Vienna)
- European Commission and European Parliament
- Council of Europe

Learning and teaching

Our programmes are modular, consisting of self-contained units, taught and assessed on a semester basis. As you progress through each semester and successfully pass the examinations, you will receive credit for the units, thus providing you with a clear indication of your academic progress.

Teaching takes the form of lectures and intensive translation and interpreting. Lectures are quite formal, whereas classes involve closer interaction between the lecturer and a small number of students for intensive training in the Translating & Interpreting discipline with plenty of time for informative discussion.

We also use the software MemoQ for the delivery of the unit, Using Technology in the Translation & Interpreting Industry; this is one of the leading tools in the industry.

Careers

The MA Interpreting & Translating is a highly vocational programme with a worldwide reputation for training professional translators and conference interpreters.

Our graduates have excellent employment prospects. While some have found rewarding jobs in smaller companies and institutions, or chosen to remain as a freelancer, many have gone on to pursue stimulating careers as professional translators and interpreters with major international organisations.

Graduates have worked for the following organisations:

- Institutional markets:

United Nations (Geneva, Vienna and New York)
European Commission (Brussels and Luxembourg)
European Parliament (Brussels and Luxembourg)
Council of Europe (Strasbourg)
International Court of Justice (The Hague)
NATO (Brussels)
Foreign and Commonwealth Office (London)
European Bank (Frankfurt)
BBC World Service (London)

- Private markets:

Microsoft
Talk Finance
Sophos
Prudential
Power Network
Gazprom

Some of our graduates have shared their experiences on our alumni blog (http://blogs.bath.ac.uk/on-parade/category/ma-interpreting-translating/).

About the department

The Department of Politics, Languages & International Studies (PoLIS) is one of the largest departments in the University.

Many staff are leading scholars in their field and are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

International and industrial links:

- Our department has links with 22 Erasmus partner institutions, as well as universities in Russia and Mexico.
- Research students regularly engage in fieldwork abroad, especially in the countries of the European Union, but also in Russia, Latin America and the United States.
- Students on the Euromasters programme study at two or three different sites in either Europe or the USA.
- In the case of the MA Interpreting & Translating and the MA Translation & Professional Language Skills, a number of work placements in Western Europe are made available to students in the language services of international organisations, government departments and commercial enterprises.

Our research

Experts from our department are publishing regularly in the most highly ranked international journals.

Our academic expertise and research activities are organised into three broad Research Clusters:

- Conflict, Security & International Order
- Governance, Citizenship & Policy
- Memory, History & Identity

International collaboration:
Many staff are internationally leading scholars in their field. We are involved in a wide range of research activities, including collaborative projects at both national and international levels.

Projects are funded by a variety of bodies such as:

- Economics & Social Research Council (ESRC)
- European Commission Framework Programme
- Arts & Humanities Research Council (AHRC)

Stimulating cutting edge research:
Our diversity and the disciplinary mix of political science, political theory, policy analysis, social anthropology, political sociology and others make for a very stimulating environment for students to develop their own research projects.

The integration of our research community is further enhanced through the International Relations & European Politics (IREP) postgraduate group.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.bath.ac.uk/hss/graduate-school/taught-programmes/how-to-apply/

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The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track. Course Structure. Part 1 (Diploma). In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Read more
The course is available in Standard Track and in Special Track

Course Structure
Part 1 (Diploma):

In addition to the Principal Subject, in which the student specialises; up to three additional subjects can be studied. Total of 120 credits.

Part 2 (MA):

Normally consists of a dissertation, composition portfolio, or critical edition (in the area of the Principal Subject). Total of 60 credits.

Course description
Standard Track:

The course combines specialisation in one area (including Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Composition, Solo Performance) with further training in up to three complimentary areas.

The range of choice on this course makes it one of the most flexible MA programmes in the UK. Students can make their education as broad or narrow as they wish. For those with a single-minded interest in one area specialised degrees are available.

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part I, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part II, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4044, 40 credits) in the student’s main area of interest. It lays the foundations of a Part 2 project in the same area. The following subjects are available:

Historical Musicology
Editorial Musicology
Ethnomusicology
Celtic Traditional Music
Music in Wales
Music and the Christian Church
Composition
Electroacoustic Composition
Composing Film Music
Studying Film Music
Solo Performance
Sacred Music Studies
Early Music
20th-/21st-century Music
WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

An additional 40 credits will be gained through submissions in other fields through either one Major Open Submission (WXM4046, 40 credits) or two Minor Open Submissions (WMP4047 and WMP4048, 20 credits each). Students can select from a number of subject areas, including, but not restricted to, those listed above. Additional offerings include modules in Arts Administration, Music in the Community, Ethnomusicology and Analysis.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Special Track:

The MA in Music (Special Track) allows students to specialise in any one of the following areas: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Studying Film Music.

All the training will be centred on the student’s main area, aided by a broader look at the methodological foundation of the discipline as a whole (through the core module in musicology).

The programme is divided into two parts: two semesters of taught study (Part 1, 120 credits) and a substantial independent piece of work in the main area, produced over the summer (Part 2, 60 credits).

Part 1 is centred on the Principal Subject module (WMM4045, 60 credits) in the student’s area of specialism. Another aspect of the same area will be explored in the Independent Special Study (WMP4049, 20 credits).

WMP4052 Preparing for the Part 2 project (10 credits) acts as a bridge between Parts 1 and 2.

Depending on the main area of specialism, students will attend a core module in musicology (WMP4041 Current Musicology, 30 credits) or composition (WMP4042 Contexts and Concepts in Composition, 30 credits). During these modules students will became familiar with up-to-date research and creative techniques and methodologies in the selected disciplines.

Subject-specific teaching is provided through a combination of individual tuition and seminar session in small groups. Within each of the chosen subject areas, students can identify their own projects, for which they will receive expert supervision.

Compulsory modules:

Standard Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (40 Credits). Study areas currently offered are: Historical Musicology, Editorial Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Celtic Traditional Music, Music in Wales, Music and the Christian Church, Composition, Electroacoustic composition / Sonic arts, Composing Film Music, Studying Film Music, Solo Performance, Music in the Community, Sacred Music Studies, Early Music, 20th-/21st-century Music.
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Open submissions: to be chosen from the optional modules (40 credits).
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits).
(Total of 120 credits)

Special Track

Principal Subject, to be chosen from the published list for that Academic Year (60 Credits). Study areas currently offered: Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Music in the Christian Church; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Studying Film Music).
Compulsory Core Module: either Current Musicology (for musicologists) or Concepts of Composition (for composers) (depending on the Principal Subject) (30 Credits).
Independent Special Study (must be in the same area as the Principal Subject) (20 credits)
Preparing for the Part Two Project (10 credits)
(Total of 120 credits)

Optional modules:

Standard Track

Open Submissions (40 or 20 credits) may be chosen in any of the following study areas (but have to be different from the Principal Subject): Historical Musicology; Editorial Musicology; Ethnomusicology; Celtic Traditional Music; Music in Wales; Music and the Christian Church; Composition; Electroacoustic Composition / Sonic Arts; Composing Film Music; Studying Film Music; Solo Performance; Sacred Music Studies; Early Music; 20th-/21st-century Music; Analysis, Arts Administration, Music Studio Techniques, Popular Music Studies, Techniques and Practice of Instrumental or Vocal Teaching (20 credits only), Performance Practice (20 credits only), Music for Instruments and Electronics (20 credits only), Supporting Studies (20 credits only), ELCOS Language Skills (20 credits, international students only.ded study (e.g. portfolio of compositions, performance recital).

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This practitioner-oriented Master’s degree provides students with a practical and theoretical foundation for successful careers in risk management, compliance, regulation and allied work streams within the financial services industry. Read more

This practitioner-oriented Master’s degree provides students with a practical and theoretical foundation for successful careers in risk management, compliance, regulation and allied work streams within the financial services industry. Skills are developed through creating a broader understanding of financial firm risk-taking, accountability, governance.

The emphasis is on a deep analysis of mainstream and critical authorship. We will challenge current and past thinking on the role of financial institutions and markets. The programme particularly encourages students to examine regulatory structures and concepts in the context of recent and past financial crises.

Students will build the skills and knowledge needed to gain an understanding of financial reform processes and their consequences for markets around the world. Rigorous classroom teaching coupled with extensive reading provides students with a sound theoretical basis. An understanding of substantive legal issues is also developed.

Contributions by industry and regulatory experts introduces students to the nuances of real world application of theoretical constructs. Practical case studies, current legal positions and interactive student discussions or presentations are used in most lectures. In addition legal, academic, practitioner and regulatory input is gained through specialist guest lectures and visits as per the ability of the year-group.

Key topics

Some key topics taught within this degree include:

  • The causes and consequences of risk-taking – an in-depth understanding of the financial crisis
  • Solvency II, Basel, UCITS, company law and corporate governance requirements
  • The roles, structure and responsibilities of key regulatory and supervisory bodies including the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, IAIS, IOSCO, European Systemic Risk Board, SEC, FINRA, UK FSA and its successors, Bank of England and other central banks, EBA, ESMA, EIOPA, BaFin, global, regional and national regulators.
  • Risk appetite and the role of the Board of Directors, Chief Risk Officer and Senior Management
  • How to build a risk management framework and a compliance plan
  • Rationales for regulation and optimal regulatory structures
  • Prudential and conduct of business controls
  • Stakeholders and the consequences of regulatory and governance failures

Highlights

  • Gain European and international insights by learning from and sharing ideas with finance & regulatory practitioners and respected academics
  • Engage with a range of critical and mainstream views 
  • Stand out from the crowd when applying from jobs by develop your own unique and informed voice
  • Broaden your international exposure with practice-centred teaching attuned to the workplace through case-studies, simulations and interactive discussions
  • Benefit from specialist seminars and class interactions, giving you the opportunity to develop critical thinking skills and the ability to work with diverse groups 

Course structure

October – December: Part 1 Autumn Term

January: Part 1 Exams

January-April: Part 2 Spring Term

May – June: Part 2 Exams

June – August (12 month programme only): Part 3

August/Sep (12 month programme only): Part 3 Coursework deadlines

Course content

Part 1 compulsory modules

Part 2 compulsory modules

Part 3 optional modules

Students on the 12-months programme should choose one from the following:

Learning options

Full-time: 9 months Full-time: 12 months

Students will be resident and undertake full-time study in the UK. Under both, the 9 and 12-month programmes students take compulsory and/or elective modules in Part 2.

The 12 month option involves taking an elective 20 credit module between July and August, which would also mean a 20 credit reduction in the number of taught modules taken in the spring term.

Careers

The financial services sector has an ever-expanding need for graduates trained in the fundamentals of compliance, governance and regulation. This increasing demand has been fuelled by implementation of a number and rules and laws, including the EU Market Abuse Directive, Markets in Financial Instruments (MiFID), global standards such as Basel II, and the FSA and US regulators’ focus on principles-based regulation, all of which require significant in-house compliance resources.

With recent explosive growth in capital markets such as China,India, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, combined with the increasing complexity of financial products and a growing sophistication on the part of investors and market participants, there are immense challenges facing institutions, compliance professionals within them and regulators.

Our graduates are in a very strong position to build successful careers in the compliance or legal divisions of investment banks, fund managers and hedge funds, retail banking institutions and other market participants.

Find out more about graduate destinations and career opportunities on our Henley Careers page

Professional accreditation

CISI Diploma

The ICMA Centre is a Chartered Institute of Securities and Investment (CISI) Centre of Excellence. Centres of Excellence are a select group of UK universities, recognised by the CISI as offering leadership in academic education on financial markets. Students who are on a financially-related masters course recognised by the CISI are eligible for exemptions and membership. 

ICMA Centre students who register and successfully complete two CISI Diploma in Capital Markets modules (Securities and Bonds & Fixed Interest Markets) are eligible for an exemption from the third module (Financial Markets).

ICMA Fixed Income Certificate

To obtain the requisite knowledge to pass the rigorous FIC exam, students are required to take the ICMA Centre Fixed Income Cash and Derivatives Markets module at Part 2. In order to receive the FIC certificate, students will need to register and pass the FIC exam through ICMA.



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Financial engineering involves the creation of financial products that are aimed specifically at the needs of investors, rather than the conventional approach of defining assets on the basis of borrowers' requirements. Read more
Financial engineering involves the creation of financial products that are aimed specifically at the needs of investors, rather than the conventional approach of defining assets on the basis of borrowers' requirements. Central to Financial Engineering are relative value (sometimes called arbitrage) trading strategies and the structuring of financial products, and the closely associated process of securitisation. Structuring involves the transformation of cash flows derived from an asset and improving the risk profile of the structured product. The contemporary derivative markets are driven by the process structuring, both in terms of transforming cash flows through “swaps” and credit enhancement through credit derivatives.

The programme aims to develop the skills and knowledge required by the modern investment and asset management industry where relative value trading strategies and structuring dominate. The emphasis is on developing a range of practical skills rather than develop an abstract "theory of everything". This reflects the need for practitioners to be able to employ different techniques in the ever changing world of contemporary finance.

The material is based substantially on the PRIMIA syllabus for risk management and the Actuarial Profession’s Specialist Technical (ST) syllabus to value and manage the risks associated with a portfolios of derivatives.

The taught component of the degree makes up 120 credits. There are seven mandatory courses leading to 75 credits and consisting of:

• Enterprise Risk Management (15 credits, Semesters 1) - a comprehensive treatment of Financial Risk Management focusing on quantitative aspects.

• Derivative Markets and Pricing (15 credits, Semester 1) - an introduction to derivative markets and how derivative products are priced.

• Modelling and Tools (15 credits, Semester 2) - the fundamental techniques of deterministic and probabilistic mathematical modelling.

• Financial Engineering (15 credits, Semester 2) - provides a thorough grounding in the mathematics underpinning Financial Engineering. Topics include non-standard derivatives, securitisation and structuring, modelling interest rates (including Libor Market Models and valuing swaptions) and contemporary issues in asset management (relative value and pairs trading strategies).

• Credit Risk Modelling (15 credits, Semester 2) - a detailed treatment of the mathematics underpinning Basel Accord on banking supervision and Solvency II for insurance.

Students will also choose three of the following five optional courses leading to a further 45 credits

• Statistical Methods (15 credits, Semester 1) - a foundation course in probability and statistics.

• Financial markets (15 credits, Semester 1) - an introduction to the financial markets.

• Time Series Analysis and Financial Econometrics (15 credits, Semester 2) - analysis and modelling of financial data.

• Modern Portfolio Theory (15 credits, Semester 2) - classical portfolio theory based on maximising expected utility

• Bayesian Inference & Computational Methods (15 credits, Semester 2) - a course on modern Bayesian statistical inference and involving implementing the Bayesian approach in practical situations

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A Masters in Architecture from the University of East London, taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology the pioneer of sustainability practice. Read more

Masters in Sustainable Architecture

A Masters in Architecture from the University of East London, taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology the pioneer of sustainability practice. Intended specifically for students pursuing a career in Architecture, the Professional Diploma course offers a unique combination of design-based academic study and practical hands-on learning. It replaces the ARB Part II validated course, the Professional Diploma in Architecture: Advanced Environmental and Energy Studies, which has been successfully running since 2009

Surrounded by mountains and forest, this location fosters a unique learning experience, in a truly sustainable environment.
CAT’s 40 years of sustainable education experience has led to the development of courses that not only tackle environmental issues, but focus on sustainability at the core of every aspect of learning. Teaching is delivered in the WISE building - itself an example of recent developments in sustainable construction - and includes a mix of studio- based design work, lectures, seminars and practicals. The annual Summer School enables students to design, detail and build a structure at CAT using the local materials available.

Students are introduced to a range of skills that are increasingly in demand within the building industry. The focus is on designing buildings in their context, to allow for adaptation to the effects of climate change and to create healthy environments for all.

Masters Aims

The M.Arch: Sustainable Architecture is aimed at the architecture student who understands that the world is in a time of transition and that building design plays an important role in environmental impact. Therefore there is great potential within the profession for environmental change and this is pivotal to the entire sustainability debate.
• Aimed at students who wish to pursue a career in architecture and wish to attain a highly credited Part II degree (note: the new M.Arch is currently seeking ARB Part II validation).
• Graduates of this course will understand built environment design in the context of adaptation to sustainability issues.
• Monthly intensive residential study weeks immerse students in their projects.
• Collaboration with external designers, architects and community projects add valuable practical experience to the students' resumes.
• Intensive twenty-two month course allows graduates to respond to the urgent need for a greater understanding of sustainability issues in the built environment.

Programme Content

The following modules are delivered via a lively mixture of practical workshops, studio-based design work, site visits, seminars and lectures.

Integrated Design Project 1
Integrated Design Project 2
Design & build Project
Final Design Project
Technical Report
Architectural Analysis through Writing 1
Architectural Analysis through Writing 2
Dissertation
Professional Studies

What qualification will you receive?

Successful completion of the programme at the Centre for Alternative Technology leads to the award of Masters of Architecture (M.Arch) by the University of East London *subject to validation.

Methods of assessment

Students are continuously assessed via essays, reports, presentations and project design work.
There is a final exhibition of students’ designs exhibited in the prestigious WISE building and assessed by external examiners.

The M.Arch: Sustainable Architecture is currently seeking prescription by the Architects Registration Board (ARB). The M.Arch: Sustainable Architecture updates CAT’s existing Part II validated course, the Professional Diploma in Architecture: Advanced Environmental and Energy Studies, which has been successfully running since 2008 . On prescription by ARB it will offer a masters level Part II architecture course and will be subject to periodic reviews, for the purposes of entry onto the United Kingdom Register of Architects. Prescription is normally granted on a four-yearly basis subject to ARB being satisfied that standard requirements have been met.

Why study at CAT?

Studying at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) is a truly unique experience. For the past 40 years CAT has been at the forefront of the environmental movement, pioneering low-carbon living and renewable technology. At the Graduate School of the Environment (GSE), students benefit from our extensive practical and academic knowledge, graduating with the skills needed to become leading players in the sustainability sector.

Hands-on learning

At CAT, hands-on learning takes place side by side with academic study. Residential on-site block learning weeks are taught at the Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT), a truly unique and inspiring learning environment. Nestled in a disused slate quarry on the edge of the Snowdonia National Park, CAT is a living laboratory for paractical, sustainable solutions. It contains some of the most innovative and renowned environmentally conscious buildings in the country, as well as one of the most diverse range of installed renewable technologies, on site water and sewage treatment, sustainably managed woodland and acres of organic gardens.

Practical building and knowledge sharing

Alongside their design and academic work, students of the Master in Architecture also participate in a variety of building projects. This allows them to get practical experience and understanding of the complexities of what happens once their designs leave the architectural studio. During these projects architecture students work alongside MSc students who will go into complimentary building professions allowing for networking and a wealth of transferable knowledge.

Immersive learning environment

Optional residential module weeks include lectures, seminars, group work and practicals. Applied work tends to dominate later in the week once we have laid the theoretical groundwork. These module weeks provide a truly immersive environment to escape daily life and apply yourself to new learning. Many eminent experts give guest lectures or hold seminars during these modules, as it is a course which seeks to draw on the expertise and learning of the whole environmental sector.

Creating high standards of Sustainable Architecture

We pride ourselves on the high standard of work that our graduates continue to produce. To see for yourself, have a look at some of the projects our students produce: https://www.flickr.com/photos/catimages/sets/72157649961496950/

Is this the course for you?

If you would like to find out more come to our open day on the 14th July. To find out more go to https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/open-day or email Shereen Soliman to book on the open day:

Find out more about the course: https://gse.cat.org.uk/index.php/postgraduate-courses/march-sustainable-architecture

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