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Master in BIG DATA. Read more
Master in BIG DATA : Data Analytics, Data Science, Data Architecture”, accredited by the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research, draws on the recognized excellence of our engineering school in business intelligence and has grown from the specializations in Decision Support, Business Intelligence and Business Analytics. The Master is primarily going to appeal to international students, "free movers" or those from our partner universities or for high-potential foreign engineers who are looking for an international career in the domain of Business Analytics.

This program leads to a Master degree and a Diplôma accredited by the French Ministry of Higher Education and research.

Objectives

Business Intelligence and now Business Analytics have become key elements of all companies.

The objective of this Master is to train specialists in information systems and decision support, holding a large range of mathematic- and computer-based tools which would allow them to deal with real problems, analyzing their complexity and bringing efficient algorithmic and architectural solutions. Big Data is going to be the Next Big Thing over the coming 10 years.

The targeted applications concern optimization in the processing of large amounts of data (known as Big Data), logistics, industrial automation, but above all it’s the development of BI systems architecture. These applications have a role in most business domains: logistics, production, finance, marketing, client relation management.

The need for trained engineering specialists in these domains is growing constantly: recent studies show a large demand of training in these areas.

Distinctive points of this course

• The triple skill-set with architecture (BI), data mining and business resource optimization.
• This master will be run by a multidisciplinary group: statistics, data mining, operational research, architecture.
• The undertaking of interdisciplinary projects.
• The methods and techniques taught in this program come from cutting-edge domains in industry and research, such as: opinion mining, social networks and big data, optimization, resource allocation and BI systems architecture.
• The Master is closely backed up by research: several students are completing their end-of-studies project on themes from the [email protected] laboratory, followed and supported by members from the laboratory (PhD students and researcher teachers).
• The training on the tools used in industry dedicated to data mining, operational research and Business Intelligence gives the students a plus in their employability after completion.
• Industrial partnerships with companies very involved in Big Data have been developed:
• SAS via the academic program and a ‘chaire d’entreprise’ (business chair), allowing our students access to Business Intelligence modules such as Enterprise Miner (data mining) and SAS-OR (in operational research).

Practical information

The Master’s degree counts for 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) in total and lasts two years. The training lasts 1252 hours (611 hours in M1 and 641 hours in M2). The semesters are divided as follows:
• M1 courses take place from September until June and count for a total of 60 ECTS
• M2 courses take place from September until mid-April and count for a total of 42ECTS
• A five-month internship (in France) from mid- April until mid- September for 9 ECTS is required and a Master thesis for 9 ECTS.

Non-French speakers will be asked to participate to a one week intensive French course that precedes the start of the program and allows students to gain the linguistic knowledge necessary for daily interactions.

[[Organization ]]
M1 modules are taught from September to June (60 ECTS, 611 h)
• Data exploration
• Inferential Statistics (3 ECTS, 30h, 1 S*)
• Data Analysis (2 ECTS, 2h, 1 S)
• Mathematics for Computer science
• Partial Differential Equations and Finite Differences (3 ECTS, 30h, 1 S)
• Operational Research: Linear Optimization (2 ECTS, 20h, 1 S)
• Combinatory Optimization (2 ECTS, 18h, 1 S)
• Complexity theory (1 ECTS, 9h, 1 S)
• Simulation and Stochastic Process (3 ECTS, 30h, 2 S**)
• Introduction to Predictive Modelling (2ECTS, 21h, 2 S)
• Deterministic and Stochastic Optimization (3 ECTS, 30h, 2 S)
• Introduction to Data Mining (2 ECTS, 21h, 2 S)
• Software and Architecture
• Object-Oriented Modelling (OOM) with UML (3 ECTS, 30h, 1 S)
• Object-Oriented Design and Programming with Java (2 ECTS, 30h, 1 S)
• Relational Database: Modelling and Design (3ECTS, 30h, 1 S)
• PLSQL (2 ECTS, 21h, 2 S)
• Architecture and Network Programming (3 ECTS, 30h, 2 S)
• Parallel Programming (3 ECTS, 30h, 2 S)
• Engineering Science
• Signal and System (3 ECTS, 21 h, 1 S)
• Signal processing (3 ECTS, 30h, 1 S)

• Research Initiation
• Scientific Paper review (1 ECTS, 9h, 1 S)
• Final research project on BIG DATA (5 ECTS, 50h, 2 S)
• Project Management
• AGIL Methods & Transverse Project (2 ECTS, 21h, 2 S)
• Languages and workshops
• French and Foreign languages (6 ECTS, 61h, 1&2 S)
• Personal and Professional Project (1 ECTS, 15, 1 S)
*1 S= 1st semester, ** 2 S= 2nd semester

M2 Program: from September to September (60 ECTS, 641h)
M2 level is a collection of modules, giving in total 60 ECTS (42 ECTS for the modules taught from September to April, plus 9 ECTS for the internship and 9 ECTS for the Master thesis).

Computer technologies
• Web Services (3 ECTS, 24h, 1 S)
• NOSQL (2 ECTS, 20h, 1 S)
• Java EE (3 ECTS, 24, 1S)
Data exploration
• Semantic web and Ontology (2 ECTS, 20h, 1 S)
• Data mining: application (2 ECTS, 20h, 1S)
• Social Network Analysis (2ECTS, 18h, 1S)
• Collective intelligence: Web Mining and Multimedia indexation (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
• Enterprise Miner SAS (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
• Text Mining and natural language (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
Operations Research
• Thorough operational research: modelling and business application (2 ECTS, 21h, 1 S)
• Game theory (1 ECTS, 10h, 1 S)
• Forecasting models (2 ECTS, 20h, 1 S)
• Constraint programming (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
• Multi-objective and multi-criteria optimisation (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
• SAS OR (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
Research Initiation Initiative
• Scientific Paper review (1 ECTS, 10h, 1 S)
• Final research project on BIG DATA (2 ECTS, 39, 2 S)
BI Architecture
• BI Theory (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
• BI Practice (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
Languages and workshops (4 ECTS, 105h, 1&2 S)
• French as a Foreign language
• CV workshop
• Personal and Professional Project
Internship
• Internship (9 ECTS, 22 weeks minimum)
Thesis
• Master thesis (9 ECTS, 150h)

Teaching

Fourteen external teachers (lecturers from universities, teacher-researchers, professors etc.), supported by a piloting committee, will bring together the training given in Cergy.

All the classes will be taught in English, with the exception of:
• The class of FLE (French as a foreign language), where the objective is to teach the students how to understand and express themselves in French.
• Cultural Openness, where the objective is to enrich the students’ knowledge of French culture.
The EISTI offers an e-learning site to all its students, which complements everything the students will learn through their presence and participation in class:
• class documents, practical work and tutorials online
• questions and discussions between teachers and students, and among students
• a possibility of handing work in online

All Master’s students are equipped with a laptop for the duration of the program that remains the property of the EISTI.

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The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law. Read more
The LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law covers a broad range of commercially focussed modules that draw on the wealth of commercial expertise across the School of Law.

LLM in Commercial and Corporate Law deals with the global and regional regulation of international trade, structuring and managing international business transactions, and the economic foundations of trade and corporate law.

Professional Module Exemptions

The Chartered Banker Institute (CBI) has recognised masters programmes offered by the School of Economics and Finance for advanced standing for the Chartered Banker Diploma. Graduates can proceed directly to the Chartered Banker Diploma with no requirement for prior underpinning study, recognising the high level of commonality of elements within LLM programme content against the CBI’s Diploma modules.

Students on the LLM programme who take both the QLLM136 Ethics in Business and in Finance and QLLM007 Banking Law modules will be eligible for exemption from the Chartered Banker Diploma compulsory module: Professionalism Regulation and Ethics.

Taught modules

Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Commercial and Corporate Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of available LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change.

Please refer the toe QMUL Law website for a full list and information on the modules for this programme.

Below is an example of some of the modules for this programme .
◦◦ QLLM011 Company Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM050 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM060 International Merger Control (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM087 Taxation Principles and Concepts (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM120 Business Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM128 Telecommunications Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM150 Strategic Decision Making for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM151 Negotiation Theory and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM181 Legal Aspects of Paperless Trade (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM300 / QLLG001 Marine Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM302 / QLLG004 Carriage of Goods (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM305 Cartels, Collusion and Competition Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM306 Competition enforcement: From investigation to sanctions (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM316 Chinese Business Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM360 Banking Law: International (sem 1)
◦ QLLM361 Banking Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM385 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context (sem 1)
◦ QLLM386 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM392 International Commercial Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM395 International Commercial Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM396 Commercial Conflicts of Laws (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)
◦ x CCLE019 Accounting for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE021 International Macroeconomics for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE026 Financial Models and Derivatives in a Legal Context (45 credits)
◦ x CCLE027 Financial Models and Application to Corporate Finance (45 credits)

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The LLM in International Business Law offers a comprehensive range of modules relevant to international trade law, business law, competition law, corporate governance, intellectual property and market regulation. Read more
The LLM in International Business Law offers a comprehensive range of modules relevant to international trade law, business law, competition law, corporate governance, intellectual property and market regulation.

Taught Modules

Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of International Business Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.
◦ QLLM011 Company Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM013 Comparative Commercial Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM021 Corporate Governance (45 credits)
◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM044 International and Comparative Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM050 International Commercial Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM060 International Merger Control (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM080 Multinational Enterprises and the Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM087 Taxation Principles and Concepts (45 credits)
◦ QLLM094 UK Competition Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM122 European Union Tax Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM150 Strategic Decision Making for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM151 Negotiation Theory and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM156 Introduction to Insurance Regulation (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM179 International and Comparative Petroleum Law and Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM181 Legal Aspects of Paperless Trade (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM182 / QLLG006 Charterparties: Law and Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM183 / QLLG005 Protection and Indemnity Clubs: Law and Practice (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM184 US Comparative Corporate Law (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM316 Chinese Business Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM367 International Financial Regulation (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM374 Law and Ethics in Finance (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM375 Corporate Governance and Responsibility in Finance (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM385 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Theory and Context (sem 1)
◦ QLLM386 Alternative Dispute Resolution: Selected Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM389 Copyright and Trademark in China (sem 1)
◦ QLLM390 Patent and Design in China (sem 2)
◦ QLLM391 International Construction Contracts and Dispute Resolution (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM392 International Commercial Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM395 International Commercial Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM396 Commercial Conflicts of Laws (sem 2)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law. Read more

About the course

The course is designed for graduates seeking to gain a solid foundation into the growing discipline of International Commercial Law.

The LLM in International Commercial Law provides a flexible route for students to focus on areas of their own interest and further explore commercial law in both the European and wider international contexts.

Our wide choice of elective modules enables students to tailor the programme to their specific needs, selecting the areas of commercial law in which they wish to specialise.

On completing the programme graduates will be able to critically analyse legal concepts as well as practical scenarios. Such knowledge is increasingly sought by law firms, businesses and government bodies all over the world in response to the expansion of international trade, commerce and international regulation, resulting from economic, political and technological change.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will gain knowledge and understanding to confidently tackle areas of controversy in the area of international commercial law

You will be able to assess critically situations and challenges, appreciate the importance of the international boundaries, and the influence of culture on the processes of law.

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of commercial, competition, trade law and financial regulations.

You will gain critical and analytical skills in this complex international field.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on both corporate law and the financial regulations in place.

You will develop the professional skills required to develop a career in commercial law, law practice and the academia.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Dissertation

Optional modules:
(modules are subject to withdrawal at the School's discretion)

Term I

EU Competition Law 1 or 2
Corporate Law I 1 or 2
Corporate Law II 1 or 2
Theory of International Finance Regulation 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation Law 1 or 2
Privacy and Data Protection 1 or 2
Principles of International Commercial Arbitration 1 or 2
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law 1 - Substantive Legal Issue 1 or 2

Term II

International Trade Law 1 or 2
International Environmental Law 1 or 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Socail Responsibility 1 or 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) and Human Rights Law 1 or 2
Practice of International Financial Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law II - Resolving internet-related Legal Issue or Disputes 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allie Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2
Practice of International Commercial Arbitration1 or 2
International Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 1 or 2

*The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

We promote a personalised learning experience that considers your interests, needs and abilities. This course is delivered through a combination of lectures which introduce you to new subjects and provide an overview of subject matter, and seminars that allow these topics to be investigated in more detail. There will be 16 hours of teaching per 15 credit module, spread out over each of the teaching terms, and classes are taught in groups of approximately 30 students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Flexible start times and learning options
The programme is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. You will have greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, whihc enables you to choose from a range of options to tailor your studies.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. The Law School is particularly proud of its diverse events programme, which students are encouraged to actively participate in to support their learning.
Brunel Law School believes that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.
Brunel Law School is highly rated for it published scholarship, and recognised amongst law firms for its distinctive courses. The school has considerable expertise in various aspects of commercial law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organised by the research centres based at the School. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills. Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

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Master’s Degree in Quantitative Finance and Risk Management draws on the recognized excellence of our engineering school in quantitative finance, and makes great use of the collaborations with the Universities of Paris-Dauphine and Cergy-Pontoise. Read more
Master’s Degree in Quantitative Finance and Risk Management draws on the recognized excellence of our engineering school in quantitative finance, and makes great use of the collaborations with the Universities of Paris-Dauphine and Cergy-Pontoise. The Master is primarily going to appeal to international students, "free movers" or those from our partner universities or for high-potential foreign engineers who are looking for an international career in the domain of finance. This program leads to a Master degree and a Diplôma accredited by the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research.

Objective

This Master’s degree covers the whole chain of quantitative finance, from theoretical aspects to the application in a professional setting. The chain can be described as follows:
o Description of the market and financial products
o Mathematical models of finance
o Mathematical models of risk
o Numerical resolution: computer-aided simulation
o Calibration and asset evaluation

Specific details of the Master:
o The Master came from the Financial Engineering option (IFI) taught at the ESITI for the last 13 years (all students from the option have found work as soon as their compulsory internships finished, and have an average salary 20% higher than the norm in this sector).
o In and of itself, the Master is intrinsically international.
o The theoretical teaching of this Master is very thorough, covering everything needed to know in the associated professions. As a consequence, the students are very adaptable within the work market.
o The Master offers a 3-skilled approach, in Computer Science, Mathematics and Finance.

Practical information
The Master’s degree counts for 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) in total and lasts two years. The training lasts 1316 hours (646 hours in M1 and 670 hours in M2). The semesters are divided as follows:
o M1 courses take place from September until June and count for a total of 60 ECTS
o M2 courses take place from September until mid-April and count for a total of 44 ECTS
o A five-month internship (in France) from mid- April until mid- September for 16 ECTS. Usual indemnities are around 1000 € per month.

Non-French speakers will be asked to participate to a one week intensive French course that precedes the start of the program and allows students to gain the linguistic knowledge necessary for daily interactions.

Organization

M1 modules are taught from September to June (60 ECTS, 646 h):
• Mathematics
• Measure and Integration (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Functional Analysis (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Stochastic Processes-Discrete/Continuous Time (5,5 ECTS, 55 h)
• Optimization (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Jump Processes and Application (3 ECTS, 30h)
• Partial Differential Equations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
 Calibration, Simulation and Numerical Analysis
• Monte Carlo Simulations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Finite Difference Methods (2,5 ECTS, 25 h)
• Calibration of Financial Models (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Bloomberg trading room (3ECTS, 30h)
• C++ and Object Oriented Design (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• VBA Programming (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Interdisciplinary Project (5 ECTS, 5 h)
 Finance and Insurance
• Introduction to Quantitative Finance (3 ECTS, 25 h)
• Risk Management in a mono-period Financial Market & Derivatives (4 ECTS, 40 h)
• Contingent Claims Valuation (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Portfolio Management and Financial Risks (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Mathematics Applied to Insurance (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• French as Foreign Language
• French as Foreign Language (4,5 ECTS, 96 h)

M1 modules are taught from September to June (60 ECTS, 646 h):
• Mathematics
• Measure and Integration (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Functional Analysis (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Stochastic Processes-Discrete/Continuous Time (5,5 ECTS, 55 h)
• Optimization (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Jump Processes and Application (3 ECTS, 30h)
• Partial Differential Equations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Calibration, Simulation and Numerical Analysis
• Monte Carlo Simulations (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Finite Difference Methods (2,5 ECTS, 25 h)
• Calibration of Financial Models (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Bloomberg trading room (3ECTS, 30h)
• C++ and Object Oriented Design (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• VBA Programming (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Interdisciplinary Project (5 ECTS, 5 h)
• Finance and Insurance
• Introduction to Quantitative Finance (3 ECTS, 25 h)
• Risk Management in a mono-period Financial Market & Derivatives (4 ECTS, 40 h)
• Contingent Claims Valuation (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Portfolio Management and Financial Risks (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Mathematics Applied to Insurance (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• French as Foreign Language
• French as Foreign Language (4,5 ECTS, 96 h)

M2 modules take place from September to Mid-April (60 ECTS, 670h)
• Mathematics
• Mathematical Statistics (2 ECTS, 21 h)
• Mathematical Tools in Finance (4,5 ECTS, 54h)
• Calibration, Simulation and Numerical Analysis
• Advanced Numerical Methods for PDEs in Finance(2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Advanced Spreadsheet Programming (2 ECTS, 24h)
• Simulations (2 ECTS, 24 h)
• Calibration (3 ECTS, 30 h)
• Theoretical and Practical Finance
• Theory of Contingent Claims (4,5 ECTS, 54 h)
• Interest Rate, Exchange and Inflation Markets (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Portfolio Managment (2,5 ECTS, 30 h)
• Imperfect Markets (2 ECTS, 20 h)
• Dynamic Hedging and Risk Measures (2 ECTS, 21 h)
• Business Evaluation (2,5 ECTS, 35 h)
• Jump Processes and Applications (2 ECTS, 21 h)
• Careers and financial products (2 ECTS, 30 h)
• Practical Fixed Income Management (2 ECTS, 24 h)
• French as Foreign Language
• French as Foreign Language (4 ECTS, 72 h)
• Master's Thesis (9 ECTS, 150 h)
• Internship (22 weeks from mid-April to)

Teaching

Fourteen external teachers (lecturers from universities, teacher-researchers, professors etc.), supported by a piloting committee, will bring together the training given in Cergy.

All the classes will be taught in English, with the exception of:
• The class of FLE (French as a foreign language), where the objective is to teach the students how to understand and express themselves in French.
• Cultural Openness, where the objective is to enrich the students’ knowledge of French culture.
The EISTI offers an e-learning site to all its students, which complements everything the students will learn through their presence and participation in class:
• class documents, practical work and tutorials online
• questions and discussions between teachers and students, and among students
• a possibility of handing work in online

All Master’s students are equipped with a laptop for the duration of the program that remains the property of the EISTI.

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Studying for an MPhil provides you with the opportunity to engage in focused research at masters level under close individual supervision. Read more

Studying for an MPhil provides you with the opportunity to engage in focused research at masters level under close individual supervision. You will gain advanced expertise on your chosen range of topics in Philosophy, as well as carry out your own research project. The skills and subject knowledge your will gain will prepare you ideally for independent academic research.

Programme content

Our MPhil is designed to cover the first two years of a ‘2+2’ programme (i.e. two year Masters plus two years PhD, or equivalent part-time study) towards completion of a doctorate. However, you are also welcome to undertake the 2-year course as a stand alone Masters-level degree, after which you may wish to apply for PhD study.

You will be required to study, and will receive supervisions in, three main areas of philosophy, chosen from two lists (see right hand column).

One list covers historical areas including key figures such as Plato, Descartes, Kant, Husserl and Wittgenstein, and the other covers topic areas including Moral and Political Philosophy, Aesthetics, Epistemology and Philosophy of Mind. We want to give you both a solid grounding in the historical tradition and the key skills to engage with debates in contemporary philosophy. In each of your three chosen areas, you will write two 5,000 word assessed essays, one due at the end of your first year, the other due at the end of the first term of the second year.

In the remainder of your second year, you will undertake and submit a research thesis of approximately 30,000 words. Completion of year two will earn you the degree MPhil in Philosophy. After this, you then have the opportunity to develop your research into a thesis of doctoral length and standard in years three and four of the programme (the PhD component). The programme as a whole can be tailored to your particular interests, reflecting our department’s research strengths. On completion of this programme, you should have sufficient depth in the relevant areas of Philosophy to be qualified to teach them at university level.

The primary means of study is by fortnightly supervisions, with at least one term of the first year devoted to each of the three areas of study you have chosen. You will be assigned a specialist supervisor for each area, who will agree with you topics for formative essays which you will produce for each supervision. In addition, you will be encouraged to attend appropriate graduate classes to support your supervisory preparation. Graduate classes may be taken from amongst those offered on our Masters programmes, or be research led classes put on for the benefit specifically of MPhil students and PhD students.



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This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. Read more
This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

Why choose this course?

Founded in 1927, the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes has established an international reputation for the quality of both its research and its teaching. As one of the largest architecture schools in the UK, with around 600 students and 70 staff, it plays a leading role in defining the national, and international, agenda in design education and research. The school enjoys an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1m in recent years. This programme provides RIBA/ARB Part 2.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

This course in detail

Year 1 - Research into design
This year has a very strong emphasis on acquiring in-depth knowledge of an architecturally important field of study and utilising that knowledge in design. This is achieved by taking one of the six 'design specialisations'.

You choose which design specialisation is best for you. The specialisations on offer are deliberately highly diverse to cater for the changing nature of the profession in practice. This course produces graduates for the global market and as such requires a high level of commitment from staff and students.

The design specialisations are:
-Advanced Architectural Design
-International Architectural Regeneration and Development
-Development and Emergency Practice
-Sustainable Building: Performance and Design
-Research-led Design
-Urban Design.

Each of the research specialisations offers teaching from experts within that subject area, and links, through teaching focus and staff, to the five research clusters that are an invaluable resource within the School of architecture.

The five research clusters keep the specialisations at the cutting edge in terms of a global agenda. They are, in general terms, environmental design, technology, development and emergency practice, humanities and architectural design.

Each of the design specialisations include a design project or projects, to which you will apply your detailed learning.

In addition to the design specialisation the first year will, through the Research Philosophy for Design module, widen your thinking in terms of what constitutes research, test your critical thinking and improved your analytical abilities. All of these are essential tools and their enhancement will place you in a stronger position to undertake the design studio in the second year.

Your ability to represent your ideas in a coherent and focused manner is the remit for the Representation module. This module will identify your strengths and build up your weaknesses, both in terms of visual and verbal communication methods. You will be able to dedicate time to fine-tuning techniques or building from basics in sketching, model making, 2D and 3D CAD. Your presentation of methods and actual practice will enable you to build confidence in verbal communication skills.

The Management, Practice and Law module in year one looks at the landscapes within which these issues are being informed. This module is taught by practising architects who have first-hand experience of the issues under discussion. Through a series of workshops you will work on topics that are essential to the practice of architecture. Management, practice and law is part of the design delivery of the programme and you will be expected to approach the coursework from a design position. This module asks that you approach this subject with a very different mind-set than the traditional position.

Due to the diverse and preparative basis of this year it is compulsory for all students to pass all compulsory components of the Research into Design year in order to be progress to the Design and Technology year.

Year 2 - Design and technology
This year is structured to enable you to synthesise a broad range of complex cultural, aesthetic, research and technical factors, and design-specialisation learning, into your major design project and portfolio.

The year is spent participating in one of six design studios. All studios have control over their own programme of projects, and each has a different view of architectural culture and promotes different design methods. The design studios are taught by some of the brightest designers and tutors in the country and consequently their programmes demand high levels of creative and intellectual endeavour from you, as well as high levels of productivity. Their aim is to raise your design thinking, skills and production to the highest possible standard.

All six units present their projects for the year in the induction session and you are asked to select all six in order of preference. This system is to allow for an even distribution of students across all six units. Most students are allocated to their first choice of studio although there is no guarantee of a particular design unit - normally at worst you are allocated your second choice.

During the design and technology year, your design work must develop into technically ambitious architecture and be the subject of your compulsory Advanced Technology for Design module. This module designs through technology and fully complements and parallels your work in the design studio. There is a very strong emphasis here upon the creative possibilities for architectural technology. We ask for an open and experimental approach to technology, but also a clear understanding of its context and aims.

The staff delivering the teaching in the design studio unit and the Advanced Technology for Design module are made up from academics and practitioners. This energetic mix will challenge you to think about design and technology in a new manner, building confidence in ability, enabling deep thinking, and aiding you to define a personal design spirit.

Sitting alongside the design and technology is the second Management, Practice and Law module. This module builds on the learning and skills from the first year module and prepares you for stepping back into practice. As in the first year module this is learning is delivered by practicing architects. Through focus groups with architectural practices, this module figures in the skills that are seen as highly desirable for the ARB part 2 graduate to have when seeking employment.

Throughout the two years of the programme there will be interim reviews. This offers an opportunity to receive feedback from outside of your design studio or design specialisation. We have strong links with practice and architectural institutions and can attract the most able people to sit on our reviews.

This is a programme that aims to give you the skills for international practice.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, modules may vary from those listed here.

Teaching and learning

The unique nature of the Applied Design in Architecture offers you the opportunity to select an individual pathway that will create a distinctive graduate profile that is unique to you alone.

The ability to choose modules from within design specialisations offers you the prospect of defining your own position. You will find that you are being taught with, in most cases, direct entry master's students from countries around the world.

This aspect is complemented by the Year 2 design studio where you will engage with a distinctive agenda and experience a diversity of design specialisation thinking from students within your unit.

Self-directed learning is highly supported by staff in the School of Architecture. Personal choice engenders motivation and a high level of commitment, and the programme has been designed to embrace this aspect whilst clearly building on skills, thinking, application and design production to achieve a final portfolio of the highest standard.

Careers and professional development

The modules Management Practice, and Law 1 and 2, include guidance on the necessary professional skills that are required both for ARB Part 2 and for preparation in commencing ARB Part 3. The design studio generates a portfolio of work that not only demonstrates the learning for ARB Part 2 but also written, research and visual skills. The design portfolio is intended as the vehicle for students to synthesise all facets of their learning in order to seek practice employment.

In addition the school maintains a jobs wall that advertises vacancies locally, nationally and internationally.

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The LLM in Banking and Finance Law provides a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of international finance and financial services law, covering local and international developments from practical, regulatory and policy perspectives. Read more
The LLM in Banking and Finance Law provides a thorough grounding in the fundamental principles of international finance and financial services law, covering local and international developments from practical, regulatory and policy perspectives. A wide range of regulatory and transactional areas are covered including, monetary law, banking law, financial regulation, central banking, securities law, secured transactions, corporate finance and M&As, insolvency cross-border insolvency, electronic banking, financing of developing economies, EU financial law and business ethics. You can choose from a wide selection of modules to design a programme of study that best facilitates your interests.

Our academics are engaged in current banking and finance policy making and legal regulatory reforms. In light of the recent economic global crisis and the ensuing new regulations, modules have been developed to reflect these changes, for example ‘Islamic Finance and Commercial Law’ and ‘Ethics in Business and in Finance’. This has led to the creation of a seminar series, featuring prominent figures from both industry and academia.

Professional Module Exemptions

The Chartered Banker Institute (CBI) has recognised masters programmes offered by the School of Economics and Finance for advanced standing for the Chartered Banker Diploma. Graduates can proceed directly to the Chartered Banker Diploma with no requirement for prior underpinning study, recognising the high level of commonality of elements within LLM Law and Economics programme content against the CBI’s Diploma modules.

Networking opportunities

On many of our modules, you will have the opportunity to hear from and discuss with prominent figures from leading institutions, including the Bank of England, the World Bank, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the European Central Bank, the Bank for International Settlements, the International Monetary Fund, as well as partners in law firms from across the world.

Taught modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the same field of law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.
QLLM007 Banking Law


◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM084 Secured Financing in Commercial Transactions (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM122 European Union Tax Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM138 General Principles of Insurance Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM139 Insurance Regulation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM141 Insurance Contracts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM142 Reinsurance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM155 Principles of Regulation (Sem1)
◦ QLLM156 Introduction to Insurance Regulation (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM164 Elements of Islamic Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM165 Islamic Finance and Commercial Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM180 US International Taxation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM195 Transfer Pricing (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM310 Compliance in Global Contexts (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM354 Information Security and the Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM357 Chinese Banking and Finance Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM360 Banking Law: International (sem 1)
◦ QLLM361 Banking Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM362 International Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM363 International Finance Law Applied (sem 2)
◦ QLLM364 Law and Finance in Emerging Economies (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM366 Regulation of Financial Markets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM367 International Financial Regulation (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM368 Corporate Rescue and Cross-border Insolvency (sem 1)
◦ QLLM369 Financial Distress and Debt Restructuring (sem 2)
◦ QLLM372 Corporate Finance Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM373 Mergers and Acquisitions (M and As) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM374 Law and Ethics in Finance (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM375 Corporate Governance and Responsibility in Finance (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM378 Securities Regulation (sem 2)
◦ x CCLE019 Accounting for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE021 International Macroeconomics for Lawyers (Sem 1)
◦ x CCLE026 Financial Models and Derivatives in a Legal Context (45 credits)
◦ x CCLE027 Financial Models and Application to Corporate Finance (45 credits)

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The LLM in Intellectual Property Law programme allows students to study introductory and advanced intellectual property (IP) and technology law and to scrutinise the policies affecting intellectual property and technology law under the guidance of leading scholars in the field. Read more
The LLM in Intellectual Property Law programme allows students to study introductory and advanced intellectual property (IP) and technology law and to scrutinise the policies affecting intellectual property and technology law under the guidance of leading scholars in the field. Students will be able to study a wide range of topics from the protection of inventions, products, trade marks, creative works and designs to the global policy surrounding the law.


Modules:


To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Intellectual Property Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM025 E-Commerce Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM076 Media Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM095 Intellectual Property and the Creative Industries (45 credits)
◦ QLLM145 Intellectual Property in Business (45 credits)
◦ QLLM162 Intellectual Property Taxation (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM178 Competition Law, Intellectual Property and Innovation (45 credits)
◦ QLLM308 Civil Enforcement of Intellectual Property (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM309 Criminal Enforcement of Intellectual Property (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM328 Digital Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM329 Informational Technology Transactions (sem 2)
◦ QLLM330 Comparative Copyright Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM331 International Copyright: International Treaties and Cross-Border Litigation (sem 1)
◦ QLLM332 Comparative Law of Patents and Trade Secrets (sem 1)
◦ QLLM333 International Law of Patents and Related Rights (sem 2)
◦ QLLM334 Licensing Intellectual Property (sem 1)
◦ QLLM335 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Art and Design (sem 1)
◦ QLLM336 Intellectual Property and Fashion: Business and Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM337 Design and Intellectual Property: EU and US
◦ QLLM338 International and Comparative Law of Unfair Competition (sem 1)
◦ QLLM339 The Law of Registered Trade Marks (sem 2)
◦ QLLM340 Global Intellectual Property: Fundamental Principles (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM341 Global Intellectual Property: Technology and Policy (sem 2)
◦ QLLM342 Interactive Entertainment and Intellectual Property Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM343 Interactive Entertainment Law: Contracts and Regulation (sem 2)
◦ QLLM344 The Law of Film (sem 1)
◦ QLLM345 The Business of Film (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM346 EU Copyright Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM348 Music Industry Contracts (sem 2)
◦ QLLM349 Transnational Mooting (sem 1)
◦ QLLM389 Copyright and Trademark in China (sem 1)
◦ QLLM390 Patent and Design in China (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Read more
The LLM in Public International Law will offer you a unique opportunity to study a wide range of courses on the role and place of law in international affairs. Questions of international Law are increasingly an important part of domestic litigation in almost all jurisdictions. The modules are designed to equip you for a career in private legal practice, diplomatic service, or work with non-governmental organisations. All courses are taught by top class academics with extensive experience in the study and application of international law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of Public International Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.


◦ QLLM023 Courts in Comparative Perspective (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM047 International and Comparative Social Justice (45 credits)
◦ QLLM053 International Criminal Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM055 International Environmental Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM057 International Law of Armed Conflict and the Use of Force (45 credits)
◦ QLLM058 International Law of the Sea (45 credits)
◦ QLLM059 International Law on the Rights of the Child (45 credits)
◦ QLLM062 International Tax Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM068 Law of Economic Crime (45 credits)
◦ QLLM069 Law of Finance and Foreign Investment in Emerging Economies (45 credits)
◦ QLLM071 Law of Treaties (45 credits)
◦ QLLM096 Climate Change Law and Policy (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM097 International Natural Resources Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM127 International Human Rights Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM167 Indigenous Rights: Selected Issues in Practice and Theory (Sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM168 International Law and Indigenous Peoples (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM176 International Refugee Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM177 International Migration Law (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM187 International Investment Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM188 Regulation of International Investment and Public Policy (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM323 State Crime (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM351 Cybercrime: Substantive Offences (sem 1)
◦ QLLM352 Cybercrime: International Co-operation and Digital Investigations (sem 2)
◦ QLLM358 Cyberspace Law: Internet Jurisdiction and Dispute Resolution (sem 2) (not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM365 Legal Aspects of Financing Development (sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM370 WTO Law: Market Access and Non-Discrimination (sem 1)
◦ QLLM371 WTO Law: Trade Remedies and Regulatory Issues (sem 2)
◦ QLLM376 International Economic Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM382 Energy Law and Ethics (sem 1)
◦ QLLM383 / QLLG008 International Regulation of Shipping (sem 1)
◦ QLLM384 Law of the Sea, Navigational Freedoms and Practice (sem 2)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM397 Investment Treaty Arbitration (sem 1)
◦ QLLM398 Investment Arbitration: Substantive Protection (sem 2)
◦ QLLM400 United States Energy Law, Regulation and Policy (sem 1)

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International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law. Read more

About the course

International Human Rights Law LLM is a unique programme designed to enable students to progress to become human rights practitioners and specialists in this dynamic area of law.

Students will critically engage with many of the human rights issues that feature strongly in public debate today, gaining comprehensive understanding of international human rights law and its interconnection with international criminal and comparative criminal law.

This course places particular emphasis on the radical transformations that international human rights law has experienced since the beginning of the 21st century, with the genesis of the International Criminal Court, the on-going process of the United Nations reform and the post 9/11 shift to a more securitarian approach to criminal process values, especially regarding the war against terror.

The course offers:

A detailed analysis of the theory, history and development of human rights, and an examination of the main regional mechanisms of human rights protection.

An overview of a variety of contemporary human rights topics, including the examination of major developments and recent tendencies in the field of international human rights protection.

Analysis of contemporary topics and challenges of international human rights protection including:
the emergence of the right to development and the so-called third- generation rights;
human rights advocacy and global governance though NGOs and non-State actors;
the crystallisation of group rights, minorities and indigenous peoples’ rights;
the challenges posed to international human rights law by international migration and the enhanced need of protection of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees;
women’s rights and the rights of the child, including protection against victims of human trafficking;
the crystallisation of general equality and the development of human rights advocacy for sexual and gay rights.

Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The School is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learning’s around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months due to dissertation submission requirements)

The course is aimed at graduates from all over the world who are keen to develop an expertise in the evolving discipline and develop a career in international human rights law.

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of international human rights law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of international human rights law.

You will be able to demonstrate through original research the application of knowledge, practical understanding and critical appreciation that can contribute to the discourse on international human rights law.

You will gain professional skills required to develop a career in international human rights law.

You will gain detailed knowledge of the European system of human rights protection in particular, both at a theoretical and practical level, including the ability to handle cases before the European Court of Human Rights.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I

European System of Human Rights Protection (15 credits) 1 or 2
Foundations of International Human Rights Law (15 credits) 1 or 2

Term II

Theory and Practice of International Human Rights (15 credits) 1
Regional Systems of Human Rights Protection: America, Africa, Asia (15 credits) 1

Optional modules:

Term I

International Human Rights and Islamic Law (15 credits) 2
Public International Law (15 credits) 1 or 2
International Humanitarian Law 2
Multiculturalism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2
International Criminal Law (15 credits) 2

Term II

International Environmental Law (15 credits) 2
Corporate Governance and Corporate Social Responsibility (15 credits) 2
World Trade Organisation (WTO) abd Human Rights Law (15 credits) 2
Human Rights of Women (15 credits) 2
Counter-terrorism and Human Rights (15 credits) 2

** The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Assessment

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience. In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions.

Assessment methods in this programme range from coursework, seen examinations and a dissertation (15,000 words) to oral presentations and assessment by contribution in seminars.

Special Features

Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops. Many of these have been on the topic of international human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular Activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies and research workshops organized by the research centres based at the school. LLM students are expected to play a leading role organising and participating in these activities.

Research Skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the university's award winning 'Professional Development Centre' which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

Teaching Expertise
Brunel Law School has an excellent reputation in this field. The International Human Rights Law Review - a peer-reviewed international journal - is edited at Brunel Law School. The school is able to attract a number of leading guest speakers to support further debate and learnings around the complexity of human rights, and provides students with a wider variety of perspectives particularly in the international context.
This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Human Rights Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in human rights practice, policy, activism and governmental, international and non-governmental organisations. As a result, the programme is research-led, and some of the reading required for the programme is based on books published by our academics.

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Programme description. The MSc in Computational Mathematical Finance (CMF) is a dynamic new programme with the aim to deliver high quality training in the theory of Mathematical Finance with strong emphasis on computational methods. Read more

Programme description

The MSc in Computational Mathematical Finance (CMF) is a dynamic new programme with the aim to deliver high quality training in the theory of Mathematical Finance with strong emphasis on computational methods.

Currently graduates in this field are expected to have a working knowledge of advanced computational finance (including construction of algorithms and programming skills) as well as a sound knowledge of the theory of Probability and Stochastic Analysis. These are the core theories needed in the modern valuation of complex financial instruments.

This MSc programme delivers:

  • a flexible programme of study relevant to the needs of employers such as: top investment banks, hedge funds and asset management firms
  • a solid knowledge in financial derivative pricing, risk management and portfolio management
  • the transferable computational skills required by the modern quantitative finance world

Programme structure

You must obtain a total of 180 credits to be awarded the MSc. Over semesters 1 and 2, you will take compulsory courses worth a total of 85 credits and optional courses worth a further 35 credits. Successful performance in these courses (assessed through coursework or examinations or both) allows you to start work on a three-month dissertation project, worth 60 credits, for the award of the MSc degree.

There are two streams: the Financial stream and the Computational stream.

Compulsory courses (both streams):

  • Stochastic Analysis in Finance (20 credits, semester 1)
  • Discrete-Time Finance (10 credits, semester 1)
  • Finance, Risk and Uncertainty (10 credits, semester 1)
  • Object-Oriented Programming with Applications (10 credits, semester 1)
  • Risk-Neutral Asset Pricing (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Stochastic Control and Dynamic Asset allocation (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Monte Carlo Methods (5 credits, semester 2)
  • Research-Linked Topics (10 credits, semesters 1 and 2)

Optional courses - Computational stream:

  • Numerical Methods for Stochastic Differential Equations [compulsory] (5 credits, semester 2)
  • Numerical Partial Differential Equations [compulsory] (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Programming Skills - HPC MSc (10 credits, semester 1)
  • Parallel Numerical Algorithms - HPC MSc (10 credits, semester 1)

Optional courses - Financial stream:

  • Financial Risk Theory [compulsory] (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Optimization Methods in Finance [compulsory] (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Advanced Time Series Econometrics (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Credit Scoring (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Computing for Operational Research and Finance (10 credits, semester 1)
  • Financial Risk Management (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Stochastic Optimization (5 credits, semester 2)

Learning outcomes

At the end of this programme you will have:

  • developed personal communications skills, initiative, and professionalism within a mathematical context
  • developed transferable skills that maximise your prospects for future employment, including writing, oral presentation, team-working, numerical and logical problem-solving, planning and time-management
  • improved your ability to convey ideas in an articulate fashion, to build upon previous mathematical training and further develop logic and deductive skills
  • mastered standard and advanced mathematical tools used to solve applied problems relevant to the mathematical finance industry
  • developed quantitative and computational skills for the proficient fulfilment of tasks in the financial sector

Career opportunities

Graduates can expect to go on to work in major financial institutions or to continue their studies by joining PhD programmes.



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As the European Union has developed into new policy areas, EU law has grown in significance. The LLM in European Law offers students the opportunity to gain a detailed knowledge of EU law in a range of fields. Read more
As the European Union has developed into new policy areas, EU law has grown in significance. The LLM in European Law offers students the opportunity to gain a detailed knowledge of EU law in a range of fields. These include constitutional law, the law relating to the single market, competition law, environmental law, employment law, the law on migration, and human rights law.

Taught Modules

To specialise in this area, you must select 90 credits of modules from this list and do your compulsory dissertation in the field of European Law (45 credits). The additional 45 credits of taught modules can be in this area or can be unrelated and therefore selected from the full list of LLM available modules.

All modules are 22.5 credits unless otherwise stated below.

Note: Not all of the modules listed will be available in any one year and semesters listed can be subject to change. Any modules not available in the forthcoming academic session will be marked as soon as this information is confirmed by teaching academics.

The updated module list below represents the result of our ongoing modularisation of the LLM which is intended to offer students greater flexibility and choice of module options.

◦ QLLM100 EU Immigration Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM101 EU Criminal Law (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM106 EU Constitutional Law I - Concepts, Values and Principles (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM107 EU Constitutional Law II - Governance (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM122 European Union Tax Law (45 credits) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM124 European Union Competition Law (45 credits)
◦ QLLM173 Terrorism and Human Rights: Constitutional Perspectives (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM174 Migration, Security and Human Rights (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM190 EU Healthcare law: Rights, Policies and Instruments (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM191 Competition and Regulation in EU Healthcare Markets (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM192 Market Integration and Regulation in the European Internal Market (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM193 Free Movement of Persons in the European Union (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM311 Policing in Local and Global Contexts (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM312 Comparative Criminal Justice (Sem 2) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM314 Transnational Law and Governance (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM315 Transnational Law and Governance in Practice (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM317 Competition and the State: EU State Aid Law (Sem 1)
◦ QLLM318 Competition and the State: Regulation of public services in the EU (Sem 2)
◦ QLLM324 Comparative Contract Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM326 The Law of the European Convention on Human Rights (sem 1)
◦ QLLM327 European Union Human Rights Law (Sem 2) (Not Running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM346 EU Copyright Law (sem 2)
◦ QLLM347 The Law of Geographical Indications (GIs) (sem 2)
◦ QLLM353 EU Data Protection Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM377 EU Financial and Monetary Law (sem 1)
◦ QLLM387 International Trade and Investment Law of the EU (sem 1) (Not running 2016-17)
◦ QLLM388 Trade, Climate Change and Energy: EU and International Perspectives (Sem 2)

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The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property. Read more

About the course

The Brunel International Intellectual Property Law LLM (available full-time and part-time) is one of the most comprehensive programmes in the UK in the field of intellectual property.

The programme provides students with extensive knowledge on the fundamentals of intellectual property, as well as the opportunity to develop specialised skills through a wide range of elective modules, covering both policy and practical technology-related issues.

Intellectual property, especially at international level, is a fast-growing area of law largely due to the impact of technology. The widespread use of the Internet and other cross-border communications and commercial technologies has led to a comprehensive and complex legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU). With the undisputed relevance of intellectual property in innovation and access to knowledge, the demand for structured study of the area has increased.

The LLM in International Intellectual Property Law keeps ahead of the 'curve' in thinking in this area, due to our highly active Intellectual Property research centre, which in addition to providing direction and support to students’ study, regularly hosts seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.

The programme is available full-time:
September (12 months)
January (15 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

And also part-time:
September (24 months)
January (27 months, due to dissertation submission requirements)

Aims

You will develop an expertise in the corpus and complexities of intellectual property law.

You will acquire critical and analytical skills in the complex field of intellectual property law.

You will be able to produce original research, apply knowledge and demonstrate practical and critical understanding

You will gain valuable professional skills required to develop a successful career.

You will be able to demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the legislative framework at international level (WTO, WIPO, EU).

This Master's course is designed for graduates from anywhere in the world who wish to develop a specialist knowledge on intellectual property law and related areas.

Course Content

The LLM consists of both compulsory and optional modules, a typical selection can be found below. Modules can vary from year to year, but these offer a good idea of what we teach.

Compulsory modules:

Term I
Philosophical Foundations of IP 1

Term II
International Intellectual Property Law 1

PLUS, EITHER

Term I
Patent Law and Practice 1

OR

Term II
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 1

Optional modules:

Term I

EU Competition Law 2
Privacy and Data Protection 2
Media Law and Regulation 1 or 2
Internet Law I - Substantive Legal Issues 2
Patent Law and Practice 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)
Trade Marks and Allied Rights 2 (if not taken as a compulsory module)

Term II

Internet Law II - Resolving Internet-related Legal Issues and Disputes 1 or 2
International Commercial Litigation 1 or 2
Copyright, Design and Allied Rights 1 or 2
Managing Intellectual Property 1 or 2

Term I and II
EU Intellectual Property Law 2

* The superscript 1 or 2 indicates which year of study each module will normally take place in for part-time students.

Teaching

The faculty places great emphasis on the creation of a unique learning experience.

In addition to attending seminars and preparing coursework and exams, students will also learn by participating in research centre activities and research trips, contributing to newsletters, making oral presentations, attending law film screenings as well as participating in debating events and reading group sessions. On average there are 16 hours of teaching per credit module, delivered through a combination of teaching methods.

This is a challenging programme that is at the forefront of thinking in International Intellectual Property Law. It is taught by leading academics with a wide range of expertise in internet law, copyright, patents and competition law.

Assessment

For each module you will be assessed twice, first by way of a written essay and then by way of a "seen" or "pre-release" examination, where the question paper is released a short time before the day of the exam.

Each assessment is worth 50% of the overall mark.

Special Features

Intellectual Property Law at Brunel University is a well-established area of teaching and research. It is highly rated for the quality of its staff publications, research projects and teaching standard.

Lecturers at the International Intellectual Property Law LLM include academics and practitioners with recognised expertise in all areas of intellectual property law.

Flexible start times and learning options
The course is available in full-time and part-time mode, with start dates in September and January. Students gain greater flexibility with this programme because Brunel Law School offers smaller 15 credit modules, which provides its students a range of options to tailor study and provide additional flexibility in study arrangements.

Research and Research Centres
The Law School benefits from active research centres which regularly host research seminars and workshops, as well as international conferences.
The Law School is equally particularly proud of its various events that are offered on Intellectual Property, there is a diverse programme which supports the learning of our students and LLM students will be expected to actively participate.
At Brunel Law School we believe that an active research community is important in providing postgraduate with the latest thinking in human rights. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework
(REF2014) we were ranked 14th in the UK for REF Intensity in Law.

Extra-curricular activities
The Law School offers students numerous opportunities to participate in extra-curricular activities, including a Reading Group, a Law Film society, mooting and debating societies, research workshops, and study visits. All students are expected to play a leading role in participating in these activities.

Research skills
The Law School offers an elaborate scheme of research and writing skills sessions designed to facilitate students’ learning and to equip them with appropriate transferable skills.
Some of the modules in this programme also integrate skills training, for example on how to answer essay questions, make use of electronic legal databases and cite legal authorities.

Career Support
Students benefit from the University’s award winning Professional Development Centre which offers specialist workshops, interview skills, and one-to-one advice sessions to help prepare graduates for their chosen career.

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In this digital and data-rich era the demand for statistics graduates from industry, the public sector and academia is high, yet the pool of such graduates is small. Read more

In this digital and data-rich era the demand for statistics graduates from industry, the public sector and academia is high, yet the pool of such graduates is small. The recent growth of data science has increased the awareness of the importance of statistics, with the analysis of data and interpretation of the results firmly embedded within this newly recognised field.

This programme is designed to train the next generation of statisticians with a focus on the newly recognised field of data science. The syllabus combines rigorous statistical theory with wider hands-on practical experience of applying statistical models to data. In particular the programme includes:

  • classical and Bayesian ideologies
  • linear and generalised linear models
  • computational statistics applied to a range of models and applications
  • regression
  • data analysis

Graduates will be in high demand. It is anticipated that the majority of students will be employed as statisticians within private and public institutions providing statistical advice/consultancy.

Programme structure

To be awarded the MSc degree you need to obtain a total of 180 credits. All students take courses during semester 1 and 2 to the value of 120 credits which will be a combination of compulsory and optional courses. Successful performance in these courses (assessed via coursework or examinations or both) permits you to start work on your dissertation (60 credits) for the award of the MSc degree. The dissertation will generally take the form of two consultancy-style case projects or an externally supervised project.

The set of courses available is subject to review in order to maintain a modern and relevant MSc programme.

Previous compulsory courses for 2016-17:

  • Statistical Theory (10 credits, semester 1)
  • Statistical Regression Models (10 credits, semester 1)
  • Bayesian Theory (10 credits, semester 1)
  • Statistical Programming (10 credits, semester 1)
  • Bayesian Data Analysis (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Likelihood and Generalised Linear Models (10 credits, semester 2)

Previous optional courses for 2016-17 include:

  • Statistical Consultancy (10 credits, semester 1)
  • Fundamentals of Optimization (10 credits, semester 1)
  • The Analysis of Survival Data (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Stochastic Modelling (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Multilevel Modelling (20 credits, semester 2)
  • Nonparametric regression (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Large Scale Optimization for Data Science (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Modern Optimization Methods for Big Data Problems (10 credits, semester 2)
  • Time Series Analysis and Forecasting (5 credits, semester 2)
  • Combinatorial Optimization (5 credits, semester 2)
  • Probabilistic Modelling and Reasoning (10 credits, semester 2)

Learning outcomes

At the end of this programme you will have:

  • knowledge and understanding of statistical theory and its applications within data science
  • the ability to formulate suitable statistical models for new problems, fit these models to real data and correctly interpret the results
  • the ability to assess the validity of statistical models and their associated limitations
  • practical experience of implementing a range of computational techniques using statistical software R and BUGS/JAGS

Career opportunities

Trained statisticians are in high demand both in public and private institutions. This programme will provide graduates with the necessary statistical skills, able to handle and analyse different forms of data, interpret the results and effectively communicate the conclusions obtained.

Graduates will have a deep knowledge of the underlying statistical principles coupled with practical experience of implementing the statistical techniques using standard software across a range of application areas, ensuring they are ideally placed for a range of different job opportunities.

The degree is also excellent preparation for further study in statistics or data science.



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