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This two-year full-time course is aimed at those who already hold a degree and wish to pursue a career in occupational therapy. By completing the course, you will be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and the College of Occupational Therapists. Read more
This two-year full-time course is aimed at those who already hold a degree and wish to pursue a career in occupational therapy. By completing the course, you will be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and the College of Occupational Therapists.

The course requires a full-time commitment from students and is delivered over two calendar years. This is in order to meet the educational requirements of the professional bodies. The curriculum runs over 45 weeks each calendar year; a total of 90 weeks in all. This means that successful graduates can register with the HCPC and potentially begin work in September, when fewer occupational therapy graduates are seeking employment. Compliance with the College of Occupational Therapists’ expectations ensures that graduates also meet the standards for the World Federation of Occupational Therapists, enabling them to work abroad in accordance with different countries’ recognition of World Federation of Occupational Therapists’ status compliance.

On completion of the Postgraduate Diploma in Occupational Therapy there is an option to undertake a 60 credit self-funded module leading to the MSc in Occupation and Health on a full- or part-time basis.

Distinctive features:

This highly respected, accelerated route is equivalent to a three-year BSc programme and is undertaken at a higher academic level. The course offers graduates a route that develops their academic and research skills, as well as meeting the requirements of the relevant professional bodies thus enabling registration and practice as an occupational therapist on completion of study.

Structure

In order to meet registration requirements, a minimum of 1000 hours of the programme take place in practice settings. These placements are distributed in blocks at dedicated times throughout the course. Placements are normally arranged across Wales and the borders of England. Students are expected to attend university on a five day per week basis.

The learning style of the curriculum reflects a philosophy that respects the academic experience of postgraduate learners. We value previous academic skills and subject knowledge as relevant to occupational therapy. Students are encouraged to take responsibility for identifying and monitoring their own learning throughout the curriculum. Academic modules are delivered as a spiral curriculum which encourages increasing depth and synthesis of knowledge throughout the learning process.

On completion of the Postgraduate Diploma in Occupational Therapy there is an option to undertake a 60 credit self-funded module leading to the MSc in Occupation and Health on a full-time or part-time basis.

Year one core modules:

Foundation Studies in Occupational Therapy
Occupational Engagement in the Lifecycle
Professional Studies in Occupational Therapy I
Occupational Interruption in the Lifecycle
Professional Studies in Occupational Therapy II

Year two core modules:

Evaluating Occupational Interruption in the Lifecycle
Research Skills for Practice
Professional Studies in Occupational Therapy III
Elective Experience

Assessment

Assessments are integrated throughout the curriculum. These include formative and summative written assignments, one written exam, one viva voce examination and assessment of practice placements. Peer evaluation is incorporated into the problem-based learning and presentation of group and individual work. Successful completion of all assignments and practice placements is required.

Career prospects

Completion of the programme leads to eligibility to register with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and the College of Occupational Therapists.

The timing of the course means that successful graduates can register with the HCPC and potentially begin work in September, when fewer occupational therapy graduates are seeking employment.

Compliance with the College of Occupational Therapists’ expectations ensures that graduates also meet the standards for the World Federation of Occupational Therapists, enabling them to work abroad.

Placements

A minimum of 1000 hours of the programme take place in practice settings. These placements are distributed in blocks at dedicated times throughout the programme. Placements are normally arranged across Wales and the borders of England.

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Educational and developmental psychologists focus on how people develop and learn throughout their lifetime. They work with individuals, families, groups and organisations in a range of settings and have varying roles such as school psychologist, guidance officer, and child and adolescent counsellor. Read more
Educational and developmental psychologists focus on how people develop and learn throughout their lifetime. They work with individuals, families, groups and organisations in a range of settings and have varying roles such as school psychologist, guidance officer, and child and adolescent counsellor. They conduct psychological and educational assessments and instructional planning for exceptional children, adolescents and adults.The Master of Educational and Developmental Psychology is an Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) accredited fifth and sixth-year sequence in psychology and prepares graduates to practise as educational and developmental psychologists in settings including schools, health and welfare services, care facilities, and within business environments.

The course develops you as an independent specialist with a professional commitment to lifelong learning and application of the theoretical, research, assessment and therapeutic skills related to educational and developmental psychology.

You will develop advanced understanding of, and the skills associated with:

- human developmental stages and processes throughout the lifespan
- psycho-educational assessment and treatment approaches for problematic or atypical development
- advanced therapeutic counselling process and the cycle of effective intervention and change
- contemporary models of exceptionality and inclusion
- evidence-based intervention and treatment programs for psychological problems and psychopathology across the lifespan
- contemporary research and theories of abilities, personality and psychopathology
- ethical, cultural and professional issues
- administering and reporting a range of essential psycho-educational assessment instruments for assessing abilities, personality and adjustment of children through to adults

In addition you will apply theory to practice with 1000 hours of supervised professional placements in a range of settings.

In undertaking a research thesis, you will develop an evidence based approach to psychology, carrying out reviews and scientific investigations relevant to the theory and practice of educational and developmental psychology.

As a graduate, you will be qualified to register as a psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia (PBA). You will also meet most requirements for membership of the College of Educational and Developmental Psychologists of the Australian Psychological Society.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/educational-and-developmental-psychology-d6007?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts, Part A. Applied academic studies in psychology and Part B. Clinical placement in psychology.

PART A. Applied academic studies in psychology (72 points)
These studies will advance your knowledge and skill development for psychology practice. Guided by sound ethical principles, and through collaborative participation in coursework lectures and workshops, you will develop both expert knowledge of psychology across the lifespan and your critical thinking skills for professional practice.

You will also undertake research, developing as a scientist-practitioner, as you carry out reviews and scientific investigations relevant to the theory and practice of educational and developmental psychology. This will culminate in a 12 - 16 000 word research thesis, involving an independent empirical investigation of a high scientific standard.

PART B. Clinical placement in psychology (24 points)
These studies are practicum placements across a variety of settings where you have the opportunity to apply theory to practice under the supervision of experienced specialist practitioners. You will complete three supervised placements totalling 1000 recorded hours of practical experience.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/education

Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education is committed to researching, communicating and applying knowledge about teaching and learning in ways that foster quality in education.

The Faculty of Education develops and provides innovative research and teaching that takes seriously the global-to-local demands of an excellent Australian public university. Our work focuses on advancing the discipline and practice of education through original research, development and partnership activities. We prepare and develop professionals and practitioners for a range of education settings and specialisations. We also engage policy and public debate on matters of importance to education and educators at all levels.

Our mission is to contribute to the public interest through high quality and ethical teaching, research, capacity building and community service. To this end, we create and pursue opportunities that strengthen and sustain a vibrant intellectual community, centred on the purposeful, critical and disciplined study of learning and teaching in a range of contexts.

Our vision is of:

- graduates who are capable, thoughtful, ethical citizens of the world, distinguished by their knowledge, intellectual engagement and professional skill, and by their commitment to lifelong learning, innovation and excellence

- research practice and scholarly output that is recognised internationally and locally for its originality, rigour and impartiality, and for providing advice and services that inform and lead professional practice, public debate, policy and community action

- an intellectual, social, physical and web environment that challenges, enthuses and supports all to learn and excel, and which sustains productive working relations characterised by mutual respect, accountability, contribution and recognition.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/educational-and-developmental-psychology-d6007?domestic=true#making-the-application

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Diversity is the hallmark of occupational therapy practice. Occupational therapists work with people of all ages to address issues related to participation in everyday life caused by illness, psychological or emotional difficulties, developmental delay, the effects of aging, and life transitions such as retirement. Read more
Diversity is the hallmark of occupational therapy practice. Occupational therapists work with people of all ages to address issues related to participation in everyday life caused by illness, psychological or emotional difficulties, developmental delay, the effects of aging, and life transitions such as retirement. They aim to address barriers that prevent individuals, families, and groups from accessing their communities in ways that are important for health and wellbeing.

This two year, accelerated learning program will enable students with a first degree in a related field to obtain a professional, entry level qualification at a postgraduate level, to practice as an Occupational Therapist.

The Master in Occupational Therapy Practice (MOTPrac) requires full-time enrolment over two years from July to May (mid-year intake). It operates over 72 weeks, with 1000 hours of fieldwork education commensurate with World Federation of Occupational Therapists' Minimum Standards for the Education of Occupational Therapists (2002).

The two-year course is an integrated curriculum centred on Scenario-Based Learning (SBL), including units focused on: Foundations of Occupational Therapy, Humans as Occupational Beings, Occupational Performance, Enabling Change in Human Occupation, Transition to Practice and Advanced Professional Practice. Fieldwork is embedded throughout the program, and includes an extensive practice based project.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/occupational-therapy-practice-4515?domestic=true

Overview

This two year, accelerated learning program will enable students with a first degree other than Occupational Therapy, but in arelated field to obtain a professional, entry level qualification at a postgraduate level of study, to practice as an Occupational Therapist.

The Master in Occupational Therapy Practice (MOTPrac) will require full-time enrolment over two years from July to May (mid year intake). It will operate over 72 weeks and include 1000 hours of fieldwork education commensurate with World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) Minimum Standards for the Education of Occupational Therapists (2002).

The course is an integrated curriculum centred on Scenario-Based Learning (SBL). The two years of the SBL curriculum will be organised into the following units: Foundations of Occupational Therapy, Humans as Occupational Beings, Occupational Performance, Enabling Change in Human Occupation, Transition to Practice and Advanced Professional Practice. Students complete an extensive practice based project.

Career opportunities

A degree in occupational therapy provides a breadth of employment opportunities; working with individuals, small groups, organisations or communities. Occupational therapists work in many settings including hospitals, rehabilitation, private practice, community health, early intervention, social services, schools, government agencies, industrial and commercial organisations, mental health services, homes, and supported housing. After gaining relevant workplace experience further career opportunities exist in education, management and research.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/medicine

Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

The Faculty is also home to a number of leading medical and biomedical research institutes and groups, and has contributed to advances in many crucial areas: in vitro fertilisation, obesity research, drug design, cardiovascular physiology, functional genomics, infectious diseases, inflammation, psychology, neurosciences and mental health.

Notwithstanding the relatively short history of our University, the Faculty is ranked in the top 50 in the world for its expertise in life sciences and biomedicine by the Times Higher Education and QS World University 2012 benchmarks.

Courses offered by the Faculty include medicine, nursing, radiography and medical imaging, nutrition and dietetics,emergency health studies, biomedical sciences, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and social work. A range of research and coursework postgraduate programs is also offered.

The Faculty takes pride in delivering outstanding education in all courses, in opening students to the possibilities offered by newly discovered knowledge, and in providing a nurturing and caring environment.

Further details may be found at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/about.html

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/occupational-therapy-practice-4515?domestic=true#making-the-application

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At Leiden University, we have one of the world's leading centres for the study of European and non-European history. The master in History is your opportunity to access this world-class expertise. Read more

At Leiden University, we have one of the world's leading centres for the study of European and non-European history. The master in History is your opportunity to access this world-class expertise.

Seven specialisations and a flexible curriculum

With such a broad curriculum, the master’s programme in History offers you the chance to specialise in niche subject areas not offered elsewhere. A flexible format also allows you to tailor your degree to suit your career goals. To help you develop a cohesive area of expertise, the programme offers seven specialisations each with their own thematic focus. Within your specialisation, you even have the added option of focusing on Maritime History, Political Debate or Economic History.

Leading scholars and an individualised approach

At Leiden University, you learn from some of the leading scholars in the field. We have a specialised faculty 'chair' in almost every area of European and non-European history, while covering almost all periods form Classical Antiquity to the present. Small-scale classes and intensive mentoring ensure you benefit from their expertise both in and outside of the classroom.

Global and comparative approach

All subjects in the master in History have a strong international orientation. Whichever your focus area, you will acquire a broad, comparative dimension to your knowledge and connect this to the latest global events. This approach to learning is not only unique to this programme but brings you a far broader understanding and an aptitude for critical thinking both of which are highly valued by employers today.

Specialisations



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The research master in History at Leiden University offers five specialisations in which you will focus on historical processes, historical research, historiography and methodology. Read more

The research master in History at Leiden University offers five specialisations in which you will focus on historical processes, historical research, historiography and methodology.

Focus on your own specific interests

The two-year research master in History at Leiden University offers you the chance to determine a study based on your own particular interests and ambitions. During your studies you will experience the riches and challenges of academia not only via frequent meetings with your tutor, but also during the seminars in which staff members and research master's students discuss one another's research findings and exchange scholarly views and insights.

Participate in the Europaeum Vaclav Havel MA Programme

Selected students will also be able to participate in the Europaeum Vaclav Havel MA Programme, an initiative of Leiden University in cooperation with the Sorbonne (Paris), the Jagiellonian University of Kraków and Charles University in Prague which leads to a separate additional master certificate in European Society and Politics issued by the Europaeum Association of leading European Universities.

Study abroad

You are encouraged to spend the third semester of your research master's abroad taking optional courses and conducting research for your thesis. Leiden University has a large network of options for your studies abroad.

Specialisations



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The Environmental Engineering MSc provides you with the advanced understanding, technical knowledge and practical skills required to enable you to develop a successful career in the environmental industries worldwide. Read more
The Environmental Engineering MSc provides you with the advanced understanding, technical knowledge and practical skills required to enable you to develop a successful career in the environmental industries worldwide.

Environmental Engineers apply scientific and engineering principles to protect the environment and public health. This comprehensive course enables you to provide clean water, treat wastewater, manage solid waste, remediate contaminated land and control air pollution.

You will study the areas of:
-Mathematical and scientific analytical methods appropriate to environmental engineering and research investigations
-Engineering project management and design
-Integrated pollution prevention and control
-Management principles and business practices
-Design, construction and operations practices
-Health and safety issues

This well-respected course has been running since 1963. Its rich history of both teaching and research assure the quality of the experience for today’s students. More than 1000 alumni of the course are now working across the world including some in senior governmental, academic and scientific positions.

Accreditation

This course is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates with an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng (Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) degree.

The course is also accredited by the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management (CIWEM) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).

Facilities

The School of Civil Engineering and Geosciences has an exceptional range of laboratories equipped with a wide range of analytical instrumentation supporting our research, teaching and contract research projects.

Chemical and Biological Research Laboratories
Geotechnics and Structures Research Laboratories

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With our Information Science MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern information and data services. Read more
With our Information Science MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern information and data services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Information Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to curious students who enjoy analysing, understanding, communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information architecture and technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MSc Information Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation: data, information, metadata, database structure, analysis, data visualisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips yous with a deep understanding of information and documentation, and its relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on technology, ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

Assessment

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of their studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present their work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MSc in Information Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation.

Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be as lectures, seminars, group work, discussion, practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of 8 taught modules, you can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Information Retrieval (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)

Career prospects

MSc Information Science graduates have an excellent record of establishing successful careers in:
-Academic and special libraries
-Research data management
-Data analysis
-Scientific,healthcare, business or media information services;
-Content and records management
-Social media management
-Information architecture
-Information literacy training.

The course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

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With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services. Read more
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management in libraries, galleries, archives or museums. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Library Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to students prepared to challenge inequalities in information access and use, who enjoy communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MA/MSc Library Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation, collection management, information organisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation and analysis, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips you with a deep understanding of collection-orientated institutions and services, and their relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Academic facilities

City has recently undergone a significant level of refurbishment, so that course participants can enjoy state of the art classrooms and facilities.

We work in close connection with our colleagues at City Library, who offer excellent support and advice to our students, in addition to contributing to our courses. Follow @cityunilibrary and @cityunilibresearchers on Twitter. You will have access to our state-of-the-art mentoring service.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Digital Libraries (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Libraries and Publishing in the Information Society (15 credits)

Elective modules - you can choose one module from the following.
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)
-Information law and policy (15 credits)
-Independent study (15 credits)
-Web applications development (15 credits)

Career prospects

Library Science MSc/MA graduates have an excellent record of finding suitable jobs and going on to successful careers, most commonly in public, academic and school libraries, consultancies, special libraries and information services and publishing. The Library Science postgraduate course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

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This course allows you to develop a broader critical understanding of the urban built environment. It is highly flexible, allowing you to choose from a wide variety of modules to suit your skills and interests. Read more
This course allows you to develop a broader critical understanding of the urban built environment. It is highly flexible, allowing you to choose from a wide variety of modules to suit your skills and interests.

The course combines taught and research elements, and offers a particularly wide range of choices for specialisation, drawing on the wide variety of postgraduate modules available within the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape.

There are only two compulsory modules on the course, giving you the flexibility to choose from a wide range of modules to suit your needs and interests. The opportunity to take modules with a very broad international theme makes this course extremely attractive to international students, offering the chance to express your learning in relation to your own country.

The course focuses on the more theoretical elements of planning and architecture but also offers some opportunity to undertake a small amount of design studio work.

This MA provides a grounding for students considering a PhD in architecture, planning or landscape, or those who wish to add a range of planning skills to an existing professional qualification in another discipline. It is relevant for anyone wishing to work in urban redevelopment or regeneration. It enhances the understanding and skills of those who are currently professional Urban Designers, Planners or Architects.

Delivery

The learning environment is informal and friendly and the approach to teaching offers a mix of theoretical and practical modules. We place strong emphasis on team and individual project work, allowing you to put your learning into practice. An optional field trip to a country in Europe or Asia provides valuable practical project experience. The field trip is not included in the cost of the course (field trip costs are between £500 - 1000 for up to 2 weeks).

Facilities

The School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape has excellent studio teaching facilities and our research suite provides designated space and equipment for each postgraduate researcher. Our facilities include:
-Studios
-Exhibition spaces
-Print room
-Seminar rooms
-IT suites

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This course covers all aspects relevant to the modern microelectronics industry, including semiconductor theory, fabrication technology, digital techniques, VLSI design and reconfigurable hardware design. Read more
This course covers all aspects relevant to the modern microelectronics industry, including semiconductor theory, fabrication technology, digital techniques, VLSI design and reconfigurable hardware design.

The course covers the main areas of microelectronics:
-Semiconductor theory and fabrication
-Digital and VSLI design
-Application areas

Our graduates are equipped for a career in any area of the industry, while having an appreciation of other aspects of the subject.

You have access to an advanced range of facilities including clean rooms and a characterisation laboratory. Work in more application-related areas involves the use of modern design software. This includes the industry-standard CADENCE suite and a full range of FPGA design facilities.

Academic staff in the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering have an international reputation for their research work. The School carries out world-leading research in microelectronic technologies. You will have the opportunity to interact with this work, particularly during your individual project. After graduation there may be opportunities for you to work towards a PhD by joining one of our research groups.

Delivery

This course consists of compulsory and optional modules, and an individual project. Assessment is by written examination at the end of each semester, coursework, and a project and dissertation conducted in association with one of the School's research groups.

Employability

We collect information from our graduates six months after they leave University. This is part of the Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey that every UK higher education institution takes part in.

Accreditation

The course is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) and Engineering Council, and therefore provides a good foundation for professional registration.

Facilities

Facilities include two clean rooms of class 100-1000 and 100-10000, with capabilities in:
-Lithography
-Deposition
-Thermal and plasma processing
-Packaging

There is a characterisation lab with comprehensive device test facilities. Leading CAD software for modelling and device design is available, some of which originates from researchers at Newcastle.

For VLSI design, you have access to the industry-standard CADENCE suite, and a variety of novel tools developed at Newcastle. There is also a comprehensive range of design tools for FPGA-based systems.

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We have expert supervision available in a wide variety of education subjects. Our research areas range from early year's policy through to internationalisation in higher education. Read more
We have expert supervision available in a wide variety of education subjects. Our research areas range from early year's policy through to internationalisation in higher education.

We offer expert supervision in the following research areas:
-Early year's policy with a focus on language and communication
-Social justice in education
-Gifted and talented children in Africa, India and the UK
-Education in popular culture
-Early literacy
-Technology enhanced learning, including language learning
-Learning to teach languages
-Counselling and wellbeing in children and adults
-The physical leaning environment
-Teaching and learning in Higher Education
-Internationalisation in Higher Education

Our supervisors' current research interests, projects and publications are available from our staff profiles. Most of our staff have professional experience in teaching, speech and language therapy or English language teaching before entering academia. You should contact Carolyn Letts, Director of Postgraduate Research, or a member of our staff as a potential supervisor before applying.

You will need to submit a short research proposal (1000 words max).

Delivery

You will study in the School of Education, Communication and Language Sciences. This is a diverse School with a high number of international students.

During your studies you will have regular meetings with your supervisory team. This is supported by email and Skype.

Your attendance on campus is flexible to accommodate your field work or data collection.

Many of our students already have well-developed professional careers. They use their professional experience to frame their research questions, connecting theory and practice. Part time study is available for those who want to study whilst working in the UK.

Our cross-disciplinary seminars include education, speech and language sciences and applied linguistics. In attending seminars you will engage with staff and students from around the world.

There is an annual competition for funded studentships through the ESRC Northern Ireland/North East (NINE) Doctoral Training Partnership. You should contact us to discuss supervision opportunities before applying for a studentship.

Our links with research centres and institutes provide opportunities for collaboration and cross-disciplinary seminars and interest groups. Our most important connections are with:
-Centre for Research in Learning and Teaching
-Institute for Health and Society
-Centre for Research in Linguistics and Language Studies

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Additional Entry requirements. Criminal Records Check. A satisfactory criminal records check will be required. Other requirements. Read more

Additional Entry requirements:

Criminal Records Check: A satisfactory criminal records check will be required. Other requirements: All students are required to purchase professional indemnity insurance. In order to go on practice placements, a health clearance check and joining the Protection of Vulnerable Groups Scheme will be required. There will be additional costs incurred for the applicant for these processes.

International students or home and EU students who want to work internationally will have to undertake additional CPD studies to meet the competencies required in order to register for the National Board exams. There will be additional costs incurred for the applicant for these processes.

Course Description:

This course will attract people holding a relevant undergraduate honours degree who wish to change career and become an occupational therapist. It is an intensive professional programme of study which will develop theoretical, analytical, practical, evaluative and reasoning skills as well as professional values.

Occupational therapists assess individuals’ disruption and disengagement from their occupations, and facilitate alternative ways for them to re-engage and participate in their occupational roles to improve their quality of life, wellbeing and sense of belonging.

Modules reflect contemporary and prospective occupational therapy practice, concerned with the relationship between the individual’s or a community’s occupations, their health, wellbeing and belonging. The programme is underpinned by person-centred, evidence-informed and occupation-focused occupational therapy practice. The course prepares graduates to work in diverse practice contexts.

Teaching, learning and assessment:

The course philosophy integrates academic and placement study. It centres on adult learning perspectives of learner-responsibility, active participation in learning, collaborative and autonomous learning and learning as a community. Problem-based learning using practice scenarios is a major feature of the learning experience where students work to develop professional reasoning, evidence informed decision making, interpersonal and team working skills. Learning is thus facilitated by a process of acquiring enquiry skills, interpreting information, group discussion, exchanging of perspectives, creation of knowledge, and arriving at a position or judgment.

Teaching methods incorporate self-directed study, practice scenarios, group work, workshops, eLearning modules, digital technology, reflection, lectures and placements. Assessment methods include peer and self-assessment, written assignments, viva voce, conference presentations, projects and placements.

Practice placements form a core element of the course and your personal performance is also assessed. There are four placements in total: Placement 1 – full-time, 6 weeks; Placement 2 – full-time, 6 weeks; Placement 3 – part-time, 14 weeks; Placement 4 – full-time, 8 weeks. There will be additional travel and accommodation costs for every placement.

Teaching hours and attendance:

Each module which you study on campus will require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. The MSc academic modules require you to attend from 9.15am – 6.15pm. You should be aware that services may operate over seven working days. Placements may involve evening and weekend attendance. You will be expected to mirror the working hours of practice educators and be required to purchase professional indemnity insurance.

Links with industry/professional bodies:

Upon successful completion of the course, you can apply for membership of the College of Occupational Therapists and will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council to work as an occupational therapist.

Modules:

15 credits: Occupational Choices and Narratives in Context/ Research Methods 30 credits: Occupational Therapy Theory, Values and Skills for Practice/ Occupational Therapy Process and Practice/ Advancing Scholarship and Professional Practice Non-credited: Manual Handling 60 credits: Research Project You will also complete undergraduate level professional practice placements 1, 2, 3 & 4 (1000 hours in total) in order to be eligible to register with the Health and Care Professions Council.

Careers:

Occupational therapists are employed in a diverse range of settings including the National Health Service, public health, education, employment services, local authority, prison service, third sector organisations and private practice. Outside the UK, graduates of this course have gone on to work in Hong Kong, Australia, Europe, Canada, the USA and New Zealand.



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This course enables graduates from any discipline to develop the theoretical, practical, analytical and evaluative skills necessary to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a physiotherapist. Read more

This course enables graduates from any discipline to develop the theoretical, practical, analytical and evaluative skills necessary to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a physiotherapist. The purpose of the course is to produce physiotherapists who are self aware, skilled, critical, analytical, reflective and evaluative, independent learners who actually contribute to shaping the future health and wellbeing of the individual and society. Graduates from the course will be distinctive in their ability to synthesise evidence from current practice and research to develop an in-depth critical knowledge and understanding of the physiotherapy profession. Furthermore, they will be able to demonstrate a critical awareness of current issues within the provision of health and social care, and will be capable of demonstrating leadership in both personal and professional development.

Teaching, learning and assessment

There is a strong emphasis on student directed learning. A variety of assessment methods are used including written assignments, practical-like exams, presentations and reflective portfolios. Practice-based learning is a major component of the course, comprising more than 1,000 hours of study at clinical sites throughout Scotland.

In Year One you will complete a two-week foundation placement in semester one and two six-week placements over the summer. In Year Two you will undertake one six-week placement in semester two and one six-week and one four-week elective placement over the summer. Any additional travel and accommodation costs associated with placement will be borne by the student. Normally there are 32–34 students per year on this course. The year group is split into smaller groups for practical classes and some tutorials. This ensures that individuals receive excellent support and benefit from sharing their experiences with their classmates.

Teaching hours and attendance

This is a full-time course and students are expected to be available 9am-5pm Monday to Friday. Students should expect to study for an average of 40 hours per week. Timetabled classes are approximately 12- 15 hours per week.

Links with industry/professional bodies

On completion, you will be eligible to apply for registration with the Health and Care Professions Council as a physiotherapist. You will also be eligible to apply for membership of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy.

Modules

10 credits: Introduction to Practice-based Learning H-level 15 credits: Preparing for Practice as and AHP/ Research Methods for Health Professionals/ Developing Innovative Physiotherapy Practice/ Supporting Health and Wellbeing 20 credits: Clinical Studies 1 CRP/ Clinical Studies 2 NMSK/ Clinical Studies 3 Neuro / Advancement of Physiotherapy Practice 40 credits: Foundations of Health Science You will also complete a dissertation (60 credits), plus 30 weeks of practice-based learning placements (105 level 10 credits).

Careers

The majority of graduates work as physiotherapists within the National Health Service – either in major hospitals or in the community. With further post-registration experience, graduates can choose to specialise in a particular area, which may include for example: sports, neurology, paediatrics, respiratory, orthopaedics or private practice. Some graduates choose to follow a research career path.

Quick Facts

  • Offers an accelerated route for graduates from any discipline to gain a recognised qualification in physiotherapy practice. 
  • Highly regarded postgraduate course which prepares graduates for success in a competitive jobs market.
  • The course offers a balance of university and practice-based experiences with students completing over 1000 hours of placement in sites around Scotland.

Criminal Records Check:

A criminal records check is required.



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This course is excellent preparation for a research degree in history. You can further your interests, broaden your knowledge and at the same time hone your research skills. Read more

About the course

This course is excellent preparation for a research degree in history. You can further your interests, broaden your knowledge and at the same time hone your research skills. As well as specific research training in history, you’ll also gain a broad range of transferable skills that will be of value to employers outside academia.

If you’re already focused on taking a PhD in history, this intensive course improves your chances of getting funding from the AHRC, ESRC and others.

Our department

We are one of the largest, most active and successful centres for teaching and historical research both in the UK and internationally. Our academic reputation means that we are ranked third in the UK for research excellence (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Our team of over 35 academic staff and 100 postgraduate students work together to create a thriving and supportive research culture. This vibrant community includes a regular research seminar series, covering a huge range of topics, and a range of research centres and networks exploring interdisciplinary themes. Our students also run an active Postgraduate Forum organising a wide variety of social and research events, and collaborating with staff and students both in Sheffield and further afield.

Our teaching

Our world-leading research informs what we teach. We offer a flexible degree structure with a wide range of modules covering a variety of periods, locations, themes and approaches.

An MA degree in history will further develop the range of transferable skills at your disposal. You will have the freedom to tailor your research and focus on the skills that are most important to you. We offer modules that are specifically designed to provide you with skills in public history – Presenting the Past, History Writer’s Workshop and Work Placement all give you real, hands-on experience.

Your future

These kinds of skills are why our graduates are successful in both further study and a wide range of careers – from taking PhDs, lecturing and working in the museum and tourist industry to business management, marketing, law and working in the media.

In addition to the personal and professional development you will experience through your modules, we offer dedicated careers support to enable you to successfully plan your future.

Studentships

University and AHRC Studentships are available. Please contact us or see our website for further details. You’ll need to submit your application by the appropriate funding deadline.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Assessment is by bibliographical and source-based exercises, written papers, oral presentation, and a 15,000 word dissertation.

Part-time study

All our masters can be taken part-time. Seminars are held during working hours (9am–6pm) – there are no lectures. The number of contact hours will vary over the two years, but you’ll usually have at least one two-hour seminar each week. You’ll take one core module each year and the rest of your course will be made up from optional modules giving you plenty of choice and flexibility over what you study.

Core modules

Dissertation; Research Presentation and a choice of research skills modules including Research Skills for Historians; Directed Reading; Palaeography; Latin and modern languages.

Examples of optional modules

Order and Disorder Around theYear 1000; Prisoners of War in the Twentieth Century; Crime and Punishment in Late Antiquity; City Life in Jacksonian America, 1828-1850; Language and Society in Early Modern England; Cold War Histories; Debating Cultural Imperialism in the Nineteenth-Century British Empire; Stories of Activism, 1960 to the Present.

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Aspects of the medieval past continue to fascinate the public imagination. Medieval castles, abbeys and churches are some of the most frequently visited heritage sites in Britain, while television programmes about the more bloodthirsty aspects of the period prove consistently popular. Read more

About the course

Aspects of the medieval past continue to fascinate the public imagination. Medieval castles, abbeys and churches are some of the most frequently visited heritage sites in Britain, while television programmes about the more bloodthirsty aspects of the period prove consistently popular.

Whatever your particular area of interest, the MA Medieval History allows you to carry out specialist research under expert supervision.

Our department

We are one of the largest, most active and successful centres for teaching and historical research both in the UK and internationally. Our academic reputation means that we are ranked third in the UK for research excellence (Research Excellence Framework 2014).

Our team of over 35 academic staff and 100 postgraduate students work together to create a thriving and supportive research culture. This vibrant community includes a regular research seminar series, covering a huge range of topics, and a range of research centres and networks exploring interdisciplinary themes. Our students also run an active Postgraduate Forum organising a wide variety of social and research events, and collaborating with staff and students both in Sheffield and further afield.

Our teaching

Our world-leading research informs what we teach. We offer a flexible degree structure with a wide range of modules covering a variety of periods, locations, themes and approaches.

An MA degree in history will further develop the range of transferable skills at your disposal. You will have the freedom to tailor your research and focus on the skills that are most important to you. We offer modules that are specifically designed to provide you with skills in public history – Presenting the Past, History Writer’s Workshop and Work Placement all give you real, hands-on experience.

Your future

These kinds of skills are why our graduates are successful in both further study and a wide range of careers – from taking PhDs, lecturing and working in the museum and tourist industry to business management, marketing, law and working in the media.

In addition to the personal and professional development you will experience through your modules, we offer dedicated careers support to enable you to successfully plan your future.

Studentships

University and AHRC Studentships are available. Please contact us or see our website for further details. You’ll need to submit your application by the appropriate funding deadline.

Teaching and assessment

You’ll be taught through seminars and individual tutorials. Assessment is by bibliographical and source-based exercises, written papers, oral presentation, and a 15,000 word dissertation.

Part-time study

All our masters can be taken part-time. Seminars are held during working hours (9am–6pm) – there are no lectures. The number of contact hours will vary over the two years, but you’ll usually have at least one two-hour seminar each week. You’ll take one core module each year and the rest of your course will be made up from optional modules giving you plenty of choice and flexibility over what you study.

Core modules

Research Presentation; Approaching the Middle Ages; Dissertation.

Examples of optional modules

Church, Life, and Law in the Central Middle Ages; The Dawn of Modernity in the Late Middle Ages; Crime and Punishment in Late Antiquity; The Transformation of the Roman World; Order and Disorder around the year 1000; Beginners Latin.

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