• Swansea University Featured Masters Courses
  • Regent’s University London Featured Masters Courses
  • University of Edinburgh Featured Masters Courses
  • University of York Featured Masters Courses
  • Imperial College London Featured Masters Courses
  • Leeds Beckett University Featured Masters Courses
  • Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University Featured Masters Courses
Birmingham City University Featured Masters Courses
Cass Business School Featured Masters Courses
University of Birmingham Featured Masters Courses
Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia Featured Masters Courses
Newcastle University Featured Masters Courses
"1000"×
0 miles

Masters Degrees (1000)

  • "1000" ×
  • clear all
Showing 1 to 15 of 84
Order by 
This course is designed to meet a rising need for highly skilled conservationists with academic qualifications at Masters level. It is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Ecological and Environmental Management (CIEEM). Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This course is designed to meet a rising need for highly skilled conservationists with academic qualifications at Masters level. It is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Ecological and Environmental Management (CIEEM). It will lead to qualification as a biodiversity conservationist and provide a stepping stone into a broad range of careers in the ecological and environmental sector.

Why study Biodiversity Conservation at NTU?

• The programme has been specially designed to meet a growing need for highly skilled biodiversity surveyors seeking careers in the ecological consultancy sector.
• One of the few courses in the UK which is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management (CIEEM).
• In addition to the normal survey skills, you have the opportunity to gain wide-ranging experience of the use of GIS as a tool for survey and management.
• The programme is delivered at the University’s Brackenhurst campus – itself a wildlife-rich rural location but within easy reach of some of the most important repositories of British wildlife, such as Sherwood Forest and the Peak District.
• You will be taught in the School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences, where you will benefit from academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly “family” atmosphere.

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• A comparison of great crested newt population assessments derived from box and funnel traps. Dr Richard Yarnell.
• Developing quantitative geography applications to understand and predict spatial processes in biodiversity conservation. Dr Marcello Di Bonito.
• Quantification of illegal snaring and its impact on wildlife populations in Malawi’s National Parks. Dr Richard Yarnell.
• A comparison of the diet of urban and rural peregrine falcons. Dr Louise Gentle.
• The importance of peatland bogs in biodiversity conservation Dr Jillian Labadz and Dr Ben Clutterbuck

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

Read less
Delivered in conjunction with the internationally-renowned Durrell Conservation Academy, this postgraduate degree will provide you with an international outlook on species recovery. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

Delivered in conjunction with the internationally-renowned Durrell Conservation Academy, this postgraduate degree will provide you with an international outlook on species recovery. You will help meet the global need for academically proficient and technically expert individuals who can bridge the gap between in-situ and ex-situ approaches to conservation.

Why study Endangered Species Recovery and Conservation at NTU?

• Received the Highly Commended Award from the Prospects Postgraduate Awards in 2014
• Undertake an international research project using NTU's links with conservation projects in North America and South Africa.
• Students can undertake a supplementary field course at the Durrell Conservation Academy to support the taught modules.
• The School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences has invested heavily in facilities and research programmes that support wildlife conservation sciences.
• Brackenhurst campus offers 200 hectares of rural estate and modern laboratories for the development of scientific skills and experience.
• Members of the programme team have research links with international organisations and conservation programmes.

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• The effect of personality on species translocation success. Dr Sam Bremner-Harrison.
• Conservation genetics of wild canids. Stephen Harrison.
• Daily behaviour and enrichment of red Squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) captive-bred for reintroduction. Dr Sam Ward & Dr Sam Bremner-Harrison.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

Read less
This postgraduate course provides a thorough understanding of Equine Health, Performance and Welfare within the context of the human use of horses. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This postgraduate course provides a thorough understanding of Equine Health, Performance and Welfare within the context of the human use of horses. You will benefit from first-class facilities and staff expertise in equine behaviour, ethics, nutrition, competition performance, animal biology and veterinary sciences. We are one of the few universities in the UK to offer taught multi-disciplinary modules that develop the scientific expertise and comprehensive understanding that potential employers are looking for.

Why study Equine Health and Welfare at NTU?

• These are unique courses in the UK focusing on Equine Health and Welfare at postgraduate level.
• Benefit from major investment in facilities – BHS (British Horse Society) approved Equestrian Centre, international size indoor and outdoor riding arenas, research arena, horse walker, round pen and crew yards, group housing pens, stabling for up to 60 horses, livery, solarium, weighbridge, treatment stocks, performance analysis room, laboratory facilities and a modern Veterinary Nursing Unit.
• Modules are delivered by academics qualified to PhD level, who are research active in their area of expertise. Their international research links provide opportunities and scope for a wide range of research projects in the field of Equine Health and Welfare.
• Teaching is supplemented by practical sessions and lectures from some of the most experienced consultants in the country.

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• An investigation of rider position upon the ridden horse in equestrian cross country. Lauren Birkbeck.
• Determining the environmental conditions experienced by sport horses during international transportation. Cassie White.
• Visual behaviour in equestrian sport. Dr Carol Hall.
• Thermal biology of equine skin. Dr Gareth Starbuck and Dr Kelly Yarnell.
• Picture recognition in the horse. Dr Carol Hall.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

Read less
This postgraduate course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes required to deal with the current food security challenges, such as. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This postgraduate course is designed to meet the growing demands for professionals equipped with the knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes required to deal with the current food security challenges, such as:

• Almost one in eight people around the world are chronically undernourished;
• Recurrent food price spikes;
• Socio-political unrest;
• Climate change;
• Land degradation;
• Scarcity of natural resources; and
• Decline in rural communities and livelihoods.

Why study Global Food Security and Development at NTU?

• Staff expertise in global agriculture, food security, environmental management, sustainability, international relations and geography
• International links with organisations such as the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly family atmosphere
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus within the School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences – a leading land-based education provider for over 60 years

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• Identifying the processes and dynamics of technological and non-technological innovations in agrifood systems and assessing the impacts of such innovations on food security Dr Mofa Islam.
• Assessing the demands for emerging agrifood technologies Dr Mofa Islam.
• Analysing the characteristics of global agrifood trade networks and their role in food security Dr Mofa Islam.
• Statistical modelling of food purchasing, consumption, and waste management behaviour Dr Mofa Islam.
• Assessing the vulnerability and resilience of agrifood systems and identifying the contributing factors Dr Mofa Islam.
• Assessing the roles of social, economic and political institutions in food security Dr Mofa Islam.
• Discourse analysis of media representations of food security issues Dr Mofa Islam.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

Read less
This postgraduate course provides a thorough understanding of Equine Health, Performance and Welfare within the context of the human use of horses. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This postgraduate course provides a thorough understanding of Equine Health, Performance and Welfare within the context of the human use of horses. You will benefit from first-class facilities and staff expertise in equine behaviour, ethics, nutrition, competition performance, animal biology and veterinary sciences. We are one of the few universities in the UK to offer taught multi-disciplinary modules that develop the scientific expertise and comprehensive understanding that potential employers are looking for.

Why study Equine Health and Welfare at NTU?

• These are unique courses in the UK focusing on Equine Health and Welfare at postgraduate level.
• Benefit from major investment in facilities – BHS (British Horse Society) approved Equestrian Centre, international size indoor and outdoor riding arenas, research arena, horse walker, round pen and crew yards, group housing pens, stabling for up to 60 horses, livery, solarium, weighbridge, treatment stocks, performance analysis room, laboratory facilities and a modern Veterinary Nursing Unit.
• Modules are delivered by academics qualified to PhD level, who are research active in their area of expertise. Their international research links provide opportunities and scope for a wide range of research projects in the field of Equine Health and Welfare.
• Teaching is supplemented by practical sessions and lectures from some of the most experienced consultants in the country.

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• An investigation of rider position upon the ridden horse in equestrian cross country. Lauren Birkbeck.
• Determining the environmental conditions experienced by sport horses during international transportation. Cassie White.
• Visual behaviour in equestrian sport. Dr Carol Hall.
• Thermal biology of equine skin. Dr Gareth Starbuck and Dr Kelly Yarnell.
• Picture recognition in the horse. Dr Carol Hall.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

Read less
This MRes in Applied Anthrozoology aims to develop an appreciation of the practical application of anthrozoological knowledge in a wide range of contexts. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

This MRes in Applied Anthrozoology aims to develop an appreciation of the practical application of anthrozoological knowledge in a wide range of contexts. These include the therapeutic use of animals, humane education and the more generic roles and uses of animals in society. The course will cover the diversity of human-animal interactions and will critically evaluate and assess the biological and social basis of these interactions, with the aim of improving our understanding and enhancing the overall quality of specific human-animal interactions.

Why study Applied Anthrozoology at NTU?

• Staff expertise and experience in the field of animal science across a range of species;
• Further develop your skills by undertaking a collaborative research project in the field of applied anthrozoology;
• Benefit from tuition in a unique postgraduate qualification in applied anthrozoology;
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus which offers 200 hectares of rural estate and modern laboratories for the development of scientific skills and experience;
• You will have access to our modern animal unit on campus which houses over 200 animals;
• Benefit from excellent links to partner organisations, conservation projects and academic institutions across the world; and
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly ‘family’ atmosphere.

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• Quantitative and qualitative welfare assessment of zoo housed giraffe involved in visitor feed experiences. Dr Sam Ward.
• The dog-handler dyad; what factors affect canine performance output? Dr Jacqueline Boyd.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

Read less
Animal Health and Welfare relates the study of animal health to improving and enhancing welfare. There is an increased global awareness of the link between animal and human health and this suggests that graduates with skills in this area are well placed for a range of career destinations within the animal sector. Read more

£1,000 postgraduate bursary available. Application deadline 1 July 2015.

Animal Health and Welfare relates the study of animal health to improving and enhancing welfare. There is an increased global awareness of the link between animal and human health and this suggests that graduates with skills in this area are well placed for a range of career destinations within the animal sector. The course aims to develop an appreciation of the theoretical and practical application of health and welfare knowledge in a wide range of contexts. These include the use of animals in a global society, agricultural production and welfare implications, companion animal biology and the more generic roles and uses of animals in society.

Why study Animal Health and Welfare at NTU?

• Staff expertise and experience in the field of animal health and welfare science across a range of species.
• Your studies will be based at the Brackenhurst campus which offers 200-hectares of rural estate and modern laboratories for the development of scientific skills and experience.
• You will have access to our modern Animal Unit on campus which houses over 200 animals.
• Benefit from a new £2.5 million campus eco-library offering IT resources 24-7.
• Benefit from excellent links to partner organisations, conservation projects and academic institutions across the world.
• You will benefit from both academic rigour and comprehensive student support within a friendly family atmosphere.

MRes projects

Students applying for this MRes course can either choose to study a relevant project of their choice, or apply to undertake one of the specific research projects listed below:

• Quantitative and qualitative welfare assessment of zoo housed giraffe involved in visitor feed experiences. Dr Sam Ward.
• An analysis of the health and welfare implications of canine sporting disciplines. Dr Jacqueline Boyd.

MRes applicants also have the opportunity to apply for a competitive £1000 bursary towards course tuition fees. In addition, all MRes students can apply for up to a maximum of £1000 to cover consumables costs, which will need to be discussed and agreed with the supervisor, and approved by School Management.

Read less
This Conversion Diploma is designed for those who wish to pursue the study of philosophy at postgraduate level but have studied little or no philosophy in their undergraduate degree. Read more

Conversion Diploma

This Conversion Diploma is designed for those who wish to pursue the study of philosophy at postgraduate level but have studied little or no philosophy in their undergraduate degree. Satisfactory performance on the Diploma leads to entry to the SASP MLitt Programme. Many previous Conversion Diploma students have gone on to further study in philosophy at PhD level – either at St Andrews/Stirling or on another equally prestigious PhD programme.

Though Conversion Diploma students take only undergraduate modules (1000 - 4000 level), they nonetheless remain bona fide members of the large and vibrant postgraduate community at the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. You are invited to all postgraduate events, such as the various postgraduate reading parties, and are strongly encouraged to get fully involved with the many and various seminars, workshops, talks, and reading groups.

To complete the Conversion Diploma, you must take 60 credits in 3000-and/or 4000-level Philosophy modules (to include at least 30 credits of a compulsory 3000-level module) and 60 further credits which may be in 1000- through 4000-level Philosophy modules. (Most 3000-and 4000-level modules are 30 credits, so this usually means you will take four modules – two in each semester).

There is also the option of taking a not-for-credit MLitt module in Basic Logic which runs every Friday in Semester 1. This module is designed for those with little or no knowledge of logic, or for those who wish to brush up on their basic logic skills.

Features

* In the latest Philosophical Gourmet Report produced by Brian Leiter the St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme was ranked the third best Philosophy programme in the UK http://www.philosophicalgourmet.com

* Between 40 – 50 taught postgraduate students are admitted each year, drawn from the UK and around the world.

* Over 35 dedicated full-time Philosophy staff in the SASP programme work in a broad spectrum of disciplines, from logic and metaphysics to moral philosophy and beyond.

* The SASP programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers, a majority of whom have significant experience of teaching at leading international institutions, and which is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects.

* There is an annual reading party in the Scottish Highlands for all taught and research postgraduates and staff.

* Friendly and congenial atmosphere in which postgraduate students are encouraged to participate actively through, for example, the weekly Graduate Seminar and the Philosophy Club.

Postgraduate community

SASP is taught by the Philosophy departments in the universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are fully merged for all postgraduate degrees.

St Andrews and Stirling together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy schools in the United Kingdom. The philosophical ambience is intense, friendly and co-operative.

The research programme is enhanced by a busy programme of conferences, workshops and visiting speakers from universities in the UK and from abroad. The St Andrews Philosophy Club meets several times each semester, usually on Wednesday afternoons, for papers by visiting speakers.

Every MLitt student is assigned an adviser at the beginning of the year. They provide you with individual guidance on essay planning, essay writing, academic conduct, and where appropriate, advice on how best to apply for a PhD place.

If you wish to brush up on your knowledge of logic, or if you have limited prior experience in this area, the SASP programme runs an additional weekly seminar, Basic Logic, throughout the year.

St Andrews also has a weekly seminar run by and for the research students, meeting Friday evenings, to which everyone is welcome. Arché (Philosophical Research Centre for the Philosophy of Logic, Language, Metaphysics and Epistemology) runs a variety of informal seminars and discussion groups. The programme also supports and encourages a wide range of student-led reading groups on topics relevant to their degree.

The student Philosophy Society (PhilSoc) is the most vibrant and active student-led society in the Faculty of Arts. It boasts a lively programme of stimulating talks and events throughout the year and attracts a regular following from across the University.

There is an annual reading party for postgraduate students and staff. The party provides an opportunity for you to present your work in an informal and relaxed setting. The reading party takes place at a country retreat in beautiful surroundings: a fine opportunity for seeing Scotland, hiking, and sampling Scottish food and drink, with the give and take of philosophy in the evenings.

The SASP programme has the most diverse postgraduate student population in the University. In addition to students from the UK, USA, Canada and across Europe, the programme has in recent years attracted students from areas such as China, Hong Kong, the Middle East and South America. This gives a uniquely international, cosmopolitan and welcoming feel to the philosophical community.

Careers

The SASP MLitt is a much sought after and highly desirable qualification which is greatly valued by leading employers nationally and internationally.

Structure of the MLitt programmes

The structure of our MLitt programmes is the same, regardless of which you choose to do.

Upon successful completion of the taught component of the programme you can progress to the MLitt dissertation which is completed during the summer. The current MLitt population is 40 students, drawn from the UK and around the world, and the annual intake is around 40 – 50 students. Many MLitt students progress to a PhD programme here or elsewhere, including some of the top institutions in the US. A first degree in or including philosophy is the normal pre-requisite. Postgraduates are taught in dedicated postgraduate classes.

Read less
Educational and developmental psychologists focus on how people develop and learn throughout their lifetime. They work with individuals, families, groups and organisations in a range of settings and have varying roles such as school psychologist, guidance officer, and child and adolescent counsellor. Read more
Educational and developmental psychologists focus on how people develop and learn throughout their lifetime. They work with individuals, families, groups and organisations in a range of settings and have varying roles such as school psychologist, guidance officer, and child and adolescent counsellor. They conduct psychological and educational assessments and instructional planning for exceptional children, adolescents and adults.The Master of Educational and Developmental Psychology is an Australian Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) accredited fifth and sixth-year sequence in psychology and prepares graduates to practise as educational and developmental psychologists in settings including schools, health and welfare services, care facilities, and within business environments.

The course develops you as an independent specialist with a professional commitment to lifelong learning and application of the theoretical, research, assessment and therapeutic skills related to educational and developmental psychology.

You will develop advanced understanding of, and the skills associated with:

- human developmental stages and processes throughout the lifespan
- psycho-educational assessment and treatment approaches for problematic or atypical development
- advanced therapeutic counselling process and the cycle of effective intervention and change
- contemporary models of exceptionality and inclusion
- evidence-based intervention and treatment programs for psychological problems and psychopathology across the lifespan
- contemporary research and theories of abilities, personality and psychopathology
- ethical, cultural and professional issues
- administering and reporting a range of essential psycho-educational assessment instruments for assessing abilities, personality and adjustment of children through to adults

In addition you will apply theory to practice with 1000 hours of supervised professional placements in a range of settings.

In undertaking a research thesis, you will develop an evidence based approach to psychology, carrying out reviews and scientific investigations relevant to the theory and practice of educational and developmental psychology.

As a graduate, you will be qualified to register as a psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia (PBA). You will also meet most requirements for membership of the College of Educational and Developmental Psychologists of the Australian Psychological Society.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/educational-and-developmental-psychology-d6007?domestic=true

Course Structure

The course is structured in two parts, Part A. Applied academic studies in psychology and Part B. Clinical placement in psychology.

PART A. Applied academic studies in psychology (72 points)
These studies will advance your knowledge and skill development for psychology practice. Guided by sound ethical principles, and through collaborative participation in coursework lectures and workshops, you will develop both expert knowledge of psychology across the lifespan and your critical thinking skills for professional practice.

You will also undertake research, developing as a scientist-practitioner, as you carry out reviews and scientific investigations relevant to the theory and practice of educational and developmental psychology. This will culminate in a 12 - 16 000 word research thesis, involving an independent empirical investigation of a high scientific standard.

PART B. Clinical placement in psychology (24 points)
These studies are practicum placements across a variety of settings where you have the opportunity to apply theory to practice under the supervision of experienced specialist practitioners. You will complete three supervised placements totalling 1000 recorded hours of practical experience.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/education

Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education is committed to researching, communicating and applying knowledge about teaching and learning in ways that foster quality in education.

The Faculty of Education develops and provides innovative research and teaching that takes seriously the global-to-local demands of an excellent Australian public university. Our work focuses on advancing the discipline and practice of education through original research, development and partnership activities. We prepare and develop professionals and practitioners for a range of education settings and specialisations. We also engage policy and public debate on matters of importance to education and educators at all levels.

Our mission is to contribute to the public interest through high quality and ethical teaching, research, capacity building and community service. To this end, we create and pursue opportunities that strengthen and sustain a vibrant intellectual community, centred on the purposeful, critical and disciplined study of learning and teaching in a range of contexts.

Our vision is of:

- graduates who are capable, thoughtful, ethical citizens of the world, distinguished by their knowledge, intellectual engagement and professional skill, and by their commitment to lifelong learning, innovation and excellence

- research practice and scholarly output that is recognised internationally and locally for its originality, rigour and impartiality, and for providing advice and services that inform and lead professional practice, public debate, policy and community action

- an intellectual, social, physical and web environment that challenges, enthuses and supports all to learn and excel, and which sustains productive working relations characterised by mutual respect, accountability, contribution and recognition.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/educational-and-developmental-psychology-d6007?domestic=true#making-the-application

Read less
Diversity is the hallmark of occupational therapy practice. Occupational therapists work with people of all ages to address issues related to participation in everyday life caused by illness, psychological or emotional difficulties, developmental delay, the effects of aging, and life transitions such as retirement. Read more
Diversity is the hallmark of occupational therapy practice. Occupational therapists work with people of all ages to address issues related to participation in everyday life caused by illness, psychological or emotional difficulties, developmental delay, the effects of aging, and life transitions such as retirement. They aim to address barriers that prevent individuals, families, and groups from accessing their communities in ways that are important for health and wellbeing.

This two year, accelerated learning program will enable students with a first degree in a related field to obtain a professional, entry level qualification at a postgraduate level, to practice as an Occupational Therapist.

The Master in Occupational Therapy Practice (MOTPrac) requires full-time enrolment over two years from July to May (mid-year intake). It operates over 72 weeks, with 1000 hours of fieldwork education commensurate with World Federation of Occupational Therapists' Minimum Standards for the Education of Occupational Therapists (2002).

The two-year course is an integrated curriculum centred on Scenario-Based Learning (SBL), including units focused on: Foundations of Occupational Therapy, Humans as Occupational Beings, Occupational Performance, Enabling Change in Human Occupation, Transition to Practice and Advanced Professional Practice. Fieldwork is embedded throughout the program, and includes an extensive practice based project.

Visit the website http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/occupational-therapy-practice-4515?domestic=true

Overview

This two year, accelerated learning program will enable students with a first degree other than Occupational Therapy, but in arelated field to obtain a professional, entry level qualification at a postgraduate level of study, to practice as an Occupational Therapist.

The Master in Occupational Therapy Practice (MOTPrac) will require full-time enrolment over two years from July to May (mid year intake). It will operate over 72 weeks and include 1000 hours of fieldwork education commensurate with World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) Minimum Standards for the Education of Occupational Therapists (2002).

The course is an integrated curriculum centred on Scenario-Based Learning (SBL). The two years of the SBL curriculum will be organised into the following units: Foundations of Occupational Therapy, Humans as Occupational Beings, Occupational Performance, Enabling Change in Human Occupation, Transition to Practice and Advanced Professional Practice. Students complete an extensive practice based project.

Career opportunities

A degree in occupational therapy provides a breadth of employment opportunities; working with individuals, small groups, organisations or communities. Occupational therapists work in many settings including hospitals, rehabilitation, private practice, community health, early intervention, social services, schools, government agencies, industrial and commercial organisations, mental health services, homes, and supported housing. After gaining relevant workplace experience further career opportunities exist in education, management and research.

For more information visit the faculty website - http://www.study.monash/media/links/faculty-websites/medicine

Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

The Faculty is also home to a number of leading medical and biomedical research institutes and groups, and has contributed to advances in many crucial areas: in vitro fertilisation, obesity research, drug design, cardiovascular physiology, functional genomics, infectious diseases, inflammation, psychology, neurosciences and mental health.

Notwithstanding the relatively short history of our University, the Faculty is ranked in the top 50 in the world for its expertise in life sciences and biomedicine by the Times Higher Education and QS World University 2012 benchmarks.

Courses offered by the Faculty include medicine, nursing, radiography and medical imaging, nutrition and dietetics,emergency health studies, biomedical sciences, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and social work. A range of research and coursework postgraduate programs is also offered.

The Faculty takes pride in delivering outstanding education in all courses, in opening students to the possibilities offered by newly discovered knowledge, and in providing a nurturing and caring environment.

Further details may be found at: http://www.med.monash.edu.au/about.html

Find out how to apply here - http://www.study.monash/courses/find-a-course/2016/occupational-therapy-practice-4515?domestic=true#making-the-application

Read less
Our Placement Course for “Project Managers in Construction and Oil & Gas Sectors” aims to complete the training of professionals who intend to become involved in the management of complex construction projects. Read more
Our Placement Course for “Project Managers in Construction and Oil & Gas Sectors” aims to complete the training of professionals who intend to become involved in the management of complex construction projects. The objective is to supply the students with a complete matrix in the discipline of Project Management, particularly highlighting the critical and crucial aspects in the Oil & Gas and Construction Sectors. At the end of the programme the students will have acquired techniques and tools useful in managing growing complex problems to obtain successful outcomes within controlled timing, costs and contents.

The programme consists of 200 hours of online training specifically related to Project Management in English, three months of
classroom training in Manchester specific to the Construction and Oil & Gas Sectors and six months (1000 hours) of practical work-experience in companies in the sectors.
- 200 hours online
- 3 months in class in Manchester
- 6 months (1000 hours) placement on construction sites
During the 6 months on the site the accommodation will be provided by the host company.

Specialise in Oil & Gas and Construction Infrastructure

The specialisation track in Oil & Gas and Construction Infrasructure provides students with a thorough understanding of the fundamentals of project management in the dynamic oil, gas, construction infrastructure and energy industries.

Students will grasp the fundamentals of the global economic nature and structure of the sectors and discover the intricacies associated with the sourcing and distribution of energy, and sustaining energy supply chains. Students should emerge ready to take on senior roles within the field.

Read less
The Environmental Engineering MSc provides you with the advanced understanding, technical knowledge and practical skills required to enable you to develop a successful career in the environmental industries worldwide. Read more

Course Overview

The Environmental Engineering MSc provides you with the advanced understanding, technical knowledge and practical skills required to enable you to develop a successful career in the environmental industries worldwide.

Environmental Engineers apply scientific and engineering principles to protect the environment and public health. This comprehensive course enables you to provide clean water, treat wastewater, manage solid waste, remediate contaminated land and control air pollution.

You will study the areas of: mathematical and scientific analytical methods appropriate to environmental engineering and research investigations; engineering project management and design; integrated pollution prevention and control; management principles and business practices; design, construction and operations practices; health and safety issues.

This well-respected course has been running since 1963. Its rich history of both teaching and research assure the quality of the experience for today’s students. More than 1000 alumni of the course are now working across the world including some in senior governmental, academic and scientific positions.

Modules

For detailed module information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/environmental-engineering-msc/#modules

How to apply

For course application information see http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/courses/degrees/environmental-engineering-msc/#howtoapply

Read less
The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. Read more
The Masters in History provides you with an outstanding learning experience in the company of Glasgow's thirty-strong cohort of historians, and the opportunity to conceive, design and execute a research project/dissertation. The programme combines training in historical theory, skills and methods with a wide range of specialist taught options which cover all periods from medieval to late modern, in relation to Scotland, Britain, Europe, America and elsewhere.

Why this programme

-Our links with the University’s museum and art gallery, The Hunterian, provide access to primary source material including an enormous collection of anatomical and pathological specimens, coins, books, manuscripts and ethnography.
-You will also enjoy access to The Baillie Collection, our prized collection of printed medieval and modern sources in Scottish, Irish and English history, which includes printed state papers, Historical Manuscript Commission publications and a select collection of modern monographs.
-If you are looking for the opportunity to pursue your own historical interests in a lively and friendly environment, led and supported by internationally-regarded historians, this programme is ideal for you.

Programme structure

Our pathway structure allows you to tailor your degree to match an interest in one of the following fields:
-Medieval history
-Modern and late modern history
-Scottish history
-Social and cultural history
-Gender history
-Military history

Each programme is built around a hands-on research training course, specialised courses on historical and theoretical themes, and other courses developing your technical skills and other abilities like languages and palaeography.

For your chosen programme, there will be a guided selection of courses that will provide you with specialised knowledge in that field. You will be taught through a series of seminars and workshops. Internationally recognised historians give guest lectures throughout the year.

These courses are taught in history, economic and social history (in the College of Social Sciences), and by related subject areas in the School of Humanities (archaeology, Celtic, classics) and the College of Arts (such as English language and French).

In the final part of the programme, you will select a specialised topic and conduct original primary source research for your dissertation. You are supported in your research and writing up by an assigned supervisor with expertise in your field of enquiry.

Core course
-Research resources and skills for historians

Optional courses (NB this is not an exhaustive list)
-American Way of War
-Approaches to History
-Belief and Conversion in Europe c. 300 – c.1000
-Century of the refugee: refugees and statelessness in comparative perspective
-Chivalry and Warfare
-Crusading Warfare in the Eastern Mediterranean
-Culture, Politics and Society in Highland Clearances
-Gender and Text
-Gender, Politics and Power
-Insurgency and Counter-Insurgency
-Issues, Ideologies & Institutions in Modern Scotland
-Medieval Palaeography 1
-Medieval Deep Structures of Russia and Eastern Europe
-Scottish Castles and Palaces in European Context, c.1100-1600
-Scottish Radicalism
-Scottish Reformation
-Secularisation and Society: the decline of religion in the west since 1800
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish Studies 1
-Specialist course in Medieval Scottish Studies 2
-Special Topic History 1
-Special Topic in History 2
-The Normans
-The Ottomans in history, 1300–1922
-Thomas Paine as an Enlightenment Revolutionary
-Western Intelligence in an Age of Terror
-Women and Power in Renaissance Italy

Career prospects

Apart from continuing to study a PhD, you can transfer the Arts research skills and methods you learn on this programme to positions in the modern public and private sectors, such as heritage, policy and projects, journalism and teaching.

Positions held by recent History graduates include Editor Business & History Products, Lead Scholar/Instructor and Secretary.

Read less
With our Information Science MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern information and data services. Read more
With our Information Science MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern information and data services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Information Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to curious students who enjoy analysing, understanding, communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information architecture and technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MSc Information Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation: data, information, metadata, database structure, analysis, data visualisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips yous with a deep understanding of information and documentation, and its relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on technology, ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

Assessment

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of their studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present their work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MSc in Information Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation.

Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be as lectures, seminars, group work, discussion, practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of 8 taught modules, you can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Information Retrieval (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)

Career prospects

MSc Information Science graduates have an excellent record of establishing successful careers in:
-Academic and special libraries
-Research data management
-Data analysis
-Scientific,healthcare, business or media information services;
-Content and records management
-Social media management
-Information architecture
-Information literacy training.

The course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

Read less
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services. Read more
With our Library Science MA/MSc you can develop the skills and understanding to initiate, work with and develop modern collection based information services.

Who is it for?

This programme is for students with a first degree or equivalent in any discipline, who have an interest in information communication, and who would like to start or develop a career in information management in libraries, galleries, archives or museums. It is also suitable for professionals wishing to update their knowledge and skills within the discipline.

Library Science is a broad discipline, and it appeals to students prepared to challenge inequalities in information access and use, who enjoy communicating and sharing information, and who like working with information technologies.

Objectives

Humanity has now entered the age of the zettabyte (1000 exabytes), with enough information being generated daily to fill US libraries several times over [Floridi L, 2014. The 4th Revolution. Oxford. p 38]. The demand for knowledge organisation, access, and understanding has never been greater.

City’s MA/MSc Library Science examines contemporary questions of information communication from a framework of information history and philosophy. Our focus is divided equally between theory and its application to practice. The course spans the fundamental concepts of documentation, collection management, information organisation, access, information literacy, use of new and emergent technologies, methods of investigation and analysis, socio-political implications and policy formulation.

The course equips you with a deep understanding of collection-orientated institutions and services, and their relevance and impact within society. There is a strong focus on ethics, professional communication and networking. You will benefit from a high level of engagement with practitioners, and we are pleased to welcome many leaders in the profession as speakers on our modules.

Academic facilities

City has recently undergone a significant level of refurbishment, so that course participants can enjoy state of the art classrooms and facilities.

We work in close connection with our colleagues at City Library, who offer excellent support and advice to our students, in addition to contributing to our courses. Follow @cityunilibrary and @cityunilibresearchers on Twitter. You will have access to our state-of-the-art mentoring service.

Placements

Internships are not a part of this course, but students who wish to are usually able to obtain work experience (paid or voluntary), or to work with external organisations in completing assignments or carrying out a dissertation project. Details of opportunities are posted on our Moodle forum.

Teaching and learning

The teaching and learning methods we use mean that your specialist knowledge and autonomy develop as you progress through the course.

Taught modules are normally delivered through a series of 30 hours of lectures.

Lectures are normally used to:
-Present and exemplify the concepts underpinning a particular subject.
-Highlight the most significant aspects of the syllabus.
-Indicate additional topics and resources for private study.

In addition to lectures and tutorial support, you also have access to a personal tutor. This is an academic member of staff from whom you can gain learning support throughout your degree. In addition, City’s online learning environment Moodle contains resources for each of the modules including lecture notes, further reading, web-based media resources and an interactive discussion forum.

We expect you to study independently and complete coursework for each module. This should amount to approximately 120 hours per module if you are studying full time. Each module is assessed through coursework, where you will need to answer a variety of assignments to show that you are able to apply your theoretical learning to practical situations.

Communication and networking via social media is an integral part of our Library Science masters course, and in preparation for professional practice, you are expected to engage with blogs, Twitter and other relevant communication media as part of your studies. Face-to-face participation in student and new professional forums including research seminars, workshops and conferences is actively promoted. You are encouraged to present your work (assignments, dissertation) to the wider LIS community for discussion and development.

The course culminates with an individual project. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently. The individual project (dissertation) allows you to demonstrate your ability to think and work independently, to be aware of and to comprehend current issues within the discipline and practice, to initiate ways of investigating and solving current problems or questions, and to deliver results and solutions on time.

The individual project is a substantial task. It is your opportunity to develop a research-related topic under the supervision of an academic member of staff. This is the moment when you can apply what you have learnt to solve a real-world problem or to develop further, contemporary conceptual theory in library science.

Modules

The MA/MSc in Library Science is offered as a one year full-time course, or two year part-time course. On successful completion of the course, you can choose between the award of MA or of MSc. This is usually based on the arts or science content of the work undertaken for the degree, and/or your career aspirations. The course structure and modules are the same for either award. The difference occurs in the focus of the assignments and the dissertation.

You can expect to study for approximately 40 hours per week full-time, and 20 hours per week part-time. The actual time required will vary according to the individual, and with existing experience and prior study.

The course comprises seven core modules and one elective module. These taught modules run during the first and second terms, whilst the third, summer term is reserved for the dissertation. Each of the modules counts for 15 credits, and requires approximately 150 hours work, of which 30 hours are face-to-face instruction (this may be lectures, seminars, group work, discussion or practical work), and 120 hours are self-directed study.

On successful completion of eight taught modules, students can progress to the dissertation. The dissertation is worth 60 credits, and takes around 400 hours. This is an original piece of research conducted with academic supervision, but largely independently.

The goal of library and information science is to enable access to, use of, and consequent understanding of information. To do this, the discipline is concerned with the processes of the information communication chain: the creation, dissemination, management, organisation, preservation, analysis and use of information, instantiated as documents.

Core modules
-Library and Information Science Foundation (15 credits)
-Digital Information Technologies and Architecture (15 credits)
-Information Organisation (15 credits)
-Digital Libraries (15 credits)
-Information Management and Policy (15 credits)
-Research Methods and Communication (15 credits)
-Libraries and Publishing in the Information Society (15 credits)

Elective modules - you can choose one module from the following.
-Information Resources and Documentation (15 credits)
-Information law and policy (15 credits)
-Independent study (15 credits)
-Web applications development (15 credits)

Career prospects

Library Science MSc/MA graduates have an excellent record of finding suitable jobs and going on to successful careers, most commonly in public, academic and school libraries, consultancies, special libraries and information services and publishing. The Library Science postgraduate course is also an excellent preparation for further study and research.

Read less

Show 10 15 30 per page


Share this page:

Cookie Policy    X