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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules.

A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawdevgov/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or for years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Development and Governance specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a course offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the course will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each course may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintcompcomlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International and Comparative Commercial Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAD106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawcultsoc/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Culture and Society specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit)
- Comparative Constitutional Law - 15PLAH046 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- Law & Critique - 15PLAH053 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAD139 (1 Unit)

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
Keele University is one of the first Higher Education Institutions to offer counsellor training in the UK and has been delivering high quality training programmes since the early 1970s. Read more

Overview

Keele University is one of the first Higher Education Institutions to offer counsellor training in the UK and has been delivering high quality training programmes since the early 1970s.

The BACP accredited Professional Counselling Training Route/part-time MSc in Counselling Psychology is a part-time vocational training programme which builds up over three years. In Year One students complete the Certificate in Counselling and in Year Two the Postgraduate Diploma in Counselling. In Year Three students undertake the MSc research studies year. Successful completion of each academic year enables either progression onto the next year or an opportunity to exit with the completed qualification.

The first two years of the part-time MSc Counselling Psychology (The Professional Counselling Training Route) are accredited by the British Association of Counsellors and Psychotherapy (BACP) as a route of professional counsellor training. Candidates for accreditation will also have to meet all other criteria in line with BACP accreditation procedures.

- Training Philosophy
This part-time professional counselling training route is founded on a person-centred view of personhood and person-centred ways of being. In this we view the relationship in counselling as central, and support Rogers’ belief in the ‘self-therapeutic capacity and wisdom of clients’. However, we also take a strong ‘anti-schoolism’ stance which reflects our sincere respect for other, non-person-centred practices and practitioners. Our starting point for the Keele Counselling Model is thus a unifying ethos which enables us to respect and welcome a diversity of professional skills and orientations.

Course Aims

The programme as a whole aims to equip students with the knowledge and expertise to support their work as professional person centred/ humanistic counsellors. It aims to integrate students’ counselling skills practice with academic study at each training level and to facilitate student learning in the areas of psychology: counselling skills, counselling related theory and self-development. The principles underpinning the programme are empowerment, holistic development, relationships and community.

- Year One: The Certificate in Counselling
This programme is an introduction to person-centred counselling theory and practice. It is suitable for individuals from a range of professional backgrounds who wish to improve their communication skills or begin training as a professional counsellor. The Certificate is an entry route onto the Postgraduate Diploma in Counselling Psychology for those without traditional academic qualifications. On completion of the Certificate in Counselling students should have gained competencies in a wide range of professional knowledge, skills and self-development relevant to counselling practice.

- Year Two: Postgraduate Diploma in Counselling Psychology
This year follows on from the Certificate in Counselling and offers professional training in counselling practice, theory and self-development. It is based on a person centred/humanistic philosophy with person-centred practice. Students are expected to undertake one hundred hours of supervised counselling practice placement. Applicants must have successfully completed the Certificate in Counselling at Keele University to access training in Year Two.

It is expected that students will progress to Year 2 in September of the year in which they complete the Certificate and, as long as they meet the requirements for progression, they are guaranteed a place on the Year 2 course starting in that September. Students may defer the commencement of Year 2 but, in this case, they would have to apply for a place and cannot be guaranteed a place in the academic year in which they wish to resume their studies.

Years 1 and 2 of the programme together constitute a BACP accredited training course. However, any other exit awards, e.g. completion of the Certificate in Counselling alone, or a Post Graduate Diploma in Counselling Psychology Studies, which would not include the 100 hours of supervised counselling practice on placement, would not constitute a BACP accredited training course.

- Year Three: MSc Counselling Psychology
Year three of the part-time MSc Counselling Psychology places a particular emphasis on developing the counselling practitioner’s own research interests, including a research based dissertation.

Teaching

We employ a wide variety of teaching and learning strategies including lectures, large group work, community meetings, tutorials and small group work. Students are encouraged to engage in experiential as well as academic learning methods.

Assessment

With the exception of a multiple-choice questionnaire classroom test in Year 2, all modules are assessed on the basis of coursework. The pass mark for all modules in Year 1 (Level 6) is 50% and, in Year 2 (Level 7), is 40%.

Additional Costs

In year 1 students have to attend a minimum of 8 hours of personal therapy and in year 2 a minimum of 20 hours of personal therapy (Subject to approval by Senate) to complete the course and payment for this is the responsibility of the students. As a guide, costs for this on average are £35 - £45 per hour.

When completing the 100 hour placement requirement in Year 2, students also have to undertake a minimum of 14 hours of supervision for which there may also be a charge. Again, as a guide, costs for this are on average £35 - £45 per hour.
Parking is also an additional cost for students who wish to use their cars on campus. Details of student parking permits are sent out with the pre-enrolment information.

Students should also be aware that possible additional costs may be incurred when attending the compulsory non-residential Conference weekend. Refreshments and lunches are provided for the students free of charge during the weekend but there will be an additional cost should students wish to attend the Saturday evening Conference dinner and also if wishing to book local accommodation.

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This programme enables students to examine and research the rich subject area of Irish history from the earliest times to the present day, and to assess the major events which led to the emergence of modern Ireland. Read more

Overview

This programme enables students to examine and research the rich subject area of Irish history from the earliest times to the present day, and to assess the major events which led to the emergence of modern Ireland. Compulsory modules provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the sources and resources at their disposal to undertake a piece of detailed research, and foster their ability to assess and understand the major debates and controversies that have engaged historians in writing Irish history. In a range of specialist modules, students explore key issues and debates associated with the individual fields (social, political, military, historic houses and landed estates, local history, etc.).

See the website https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/history/our-courses/ma-irish-history-0

Minimum English language requirements: please visit Maynooth University International Office website (https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/international/study-maynooth/postgraduate ) for information about English language tests accepted and required scores. The requirements specified are applicable for both EU and non-EU applicants.

National University of Ireland Maynooth’s TOEFL code is 8850

Course Structure

- Course Structure (Content):
This programme comprises two parts: taught modules (a combination of compulsory and optional modules) [50 credits] and a minor research thesis [40 credits] [90 credits in total].

- Compulsory modules:
Compulsory taught modules focus on familiarising students with the resources and sources available for the study of Irish history and also with the major debates and controversies in areas such as Irish urban history, women’s history, Irish emigration and Diaspora.

Part-time students may take one module in Semester 1 of their first year and the other in Semester 1 of their second year. Compulsory modules will be delivered in the evening on alternate years to enable part-time students to take both modules over the two-year cycle of the programme.

All students must successfully complete compulsory modules amounting to a total of 25 credits.

- Optional modules:
Students choose from a suite of optional modules which include Historic Houses and the world of goods; The evolution of Irish landed estates; The Irish soldier; Victorian Ireland; The evolution of the urban landscape; Doing local history; Reading the Irish landscape. All optional modules are delivered in Semester 2 of each academic year.

A suite of optional modules on offer will be delivered in the evening on alternate years to enable Part-time students to take a selection over the two-year cycle of the programme.

Note: The range of optional modules available to Part-time students will depend upon the number of students who register for individual modules.

All students must successfully complete optional modules amounting to a total of 25 credits.

- Thesis preparation and thesis completion:
Thesis modules span both semesters.

Part-time students complete HY608 Thesis preparation during Semester 1 of Year 2 and HY609 Thesis completion during Semester 2 of Year 2. A total of 40 credits are awarded for thesis preparation and completion. Students submit their thesis by 1 July of Year 2.

Career Options

A Taught Masters Degree in Irish History provides a good basis for pursuing a career in education, journalism, civil service, research, arts administration, archives, library and information service, the diplomatic service, politics, law, public relations, public administration among other options.

Find out how to apply here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/history/our-courses/ma-irish-history-0#tabs-apply

Find information on Scholarships here https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/study-maynooth/postgraduate-studies/fees-funding-scholarships

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The HEC Paris MBA Part-time option has one intake in January and offers you the opportunity to earn an HEC Paris MBA degree, while still actively pursuing your professional career. Read more
The HEC Paris MBA Part-time option has one intake in January and offers you the opportunity to earn an HEC Paris MBA degree, while still actively pursuing your professional career. The curriculum incorporates a built-in career development program with our Career Management Center.

The program is divided into two phases: Fundamental and Customized. In the 12-month Fundamental Phase, you will acquire the core business skills that are crucial in carving out a successful business career. In the Customized Phase, which can be completed in 6-12 months, you will choose from a broad range of electives and carry out a consulting project, be it with your current company or a different one. You can even apply for a one-week exchange program with UCLA. You also have the option to join the Full-time cohort for one term and do a specialization or go on an international exchange.

Two Options: One MBA

The Admissions Process for both our Full-time and Part-time options is the same, and candidates are expected to show the same level of academic accomplishment. Part-time students are able to work alongside their Full-time peers during the Customized Phase of the program, as two intakes become one class, reinforcing the sense of community at HEC.

WIN-WIN OPTIONS

Benefit from your MBA before you graduate - what you learn in class one week can be directly applied at work the next.

FUNDAMENTAL PHASE

Core courses 1:

Core 1 has been designed to help you build the foundations for an in-depth understanding of business, with theoretically-strong subjects such as Business Economics and Financial Markets. Teaching methods vary from lectures to simulations and business games (Negosim Business Simulation http://www.mba.hec.edu/, Bach Business Game http://www.mba.hec.edu/).

Core courses 2:

The courses of Core 2 cover advanced business topics, such as Corporate Finance and Strategic Management, expanding upon the fundamental knowledge you will have learned in Core 1.

Career Building & Coaching:

The Career Management Center (http://www.mba.hec.edu/Careers/Career-Management-Center) is here to provide support and services that fall in line with your personal goals and professional aspirations. This includes many corporate outreach events and access to companies via on-campus fairs, corporate presentations and "roundtables" with influential leaders from various sectors.

CUSTOMIZED PHASE

Track & Electives:

During the second half of the program you can tailor your MBA by choosing one of four tracks available.

Fieldwork project:

Undertaking a Fieldwork projects is a key part of the Part-time MBA curriculum, with an emphasis on learning through doing. These experiential learning projects are done in partnership with a paying client or company. The project must be closely linked with your future career plan and professional goals. This project can be a foot in the door in a new country, sector or industry, or can simply be a way of gaining further understanding of the sector/company you are currently working in.

All projects are advised by an HEC faculty member and last 8 months.

Leadership Development:

Leadership is a transformative process enhanced through hands-on, practical experience and experiential learning initiatives. Integrated into your curriculum are seminars and student-run events.

Career Building & Coaching (Advanced):

During the customized phase of the program our participants benefit from a personalized approach to career building, incorporating many information sessions, job search training, bootcamps and workshops.

ADD ON OPTIONS

Certificates:

You can complement your MBA training by applying for industry-specific “certificates” sponsored by leading companies. Certificates are offered to all Masters and MBA students in the Spring term.

Each certificate is a set of interdisciplinary courses accounting for approximately 100 contact hours.

GREM Wisconsin School of Business:

HEC Paris and Wisconsin School of Business, USA, are partners to offer you the Global Real Estate Master (GREM) Program in addition to your MBA degree. The 4 month program at Wisconsin starts mid-January 2012 through to mid-May. The first of its kind, GREM - Global Real Estate MSc - offers a specific skills set and experience that prepare you for global real estate. On completion of GREM (course cost $14,000 (USD)), participants receive two degrees and join 2 top-ranked international business school alumni networks.

The program is open to HEC MBA graduates, or within 5 years of graduation. For more information visit the GREM Program website - http://bus.wisc.edu/degrees-programs/msmacc/grem

Majors EMBA:

The Majors will allow you to:

> Deepen your knowledge of an industry or region
> Identify strategic opportunities
> Enhance your decision-making skills
> Sharpen your strategic analysis

AVAILABLE ON A FULL TIME BASIS

International Exchange:

Are you interested in spending a full term at one of our partner universities? As a Part-time student, all of our international exchange options are open to you, under the exact same conditions as for our Full-time students. This is a rather selective process and we send around forty students per year on international exchanges.

Specializations:

During the second half of the program you can tailor your MBA to suit your career goals and interests by choosing from one of five specializations available.

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The MA in Education part time is an innovative and flexible course that caters to the needs of professionals working in the field of education. Read more
The MA in Education part time is an innovative and flexible course that caters to the needs of professionals working in the field of education. There are various pathways through it and it can therefore be closely tailored to your own professional development. The MA is built on a modular basis enabling you to build it around your personal and professional life.

The MA comprises of modules that can be studied one by one. The key element of many modules is the provision for ‘shared enquiry’, enabling participants to engage with other professional colleagues and researchers in developing critical approaches to enquiry within practical education (and education-related) contexts.

There are various pathways through this MA. However the final module taken by all students is a research thesis, via which you will have the opportunity to research and write about an area of practice, relevant to you, in great depth.

Distinctive approaches to learning and teaching

The course is taught through a series of seminars and workshops with additional small group and individual tutorials being provided for all students. All teaching takes place in small groups which enables students to engage in discussion and debate. In addition to the main programme, students will have opportunities to attend research seminars, day courses and other activities. All modules are taught by members of the university’s academic staff, all of whom are active as researchers and involved in publication and continuing professional development. Each module is co-ordinated by a module leader who has extensive experience and expertise in the area of the module content. The course also makes use of visiting lecturers from other academic institutions from within the UK and further afield.

Course content

The part time master’s programme is designed for professionals who want to extend their knowledge, skills and understanding of learning, teaching, leadership, assessment and other educational issues.

It typically takes three years to gain a master’s degree via this route. However, teachers who have studied with the University of Northampton before may well already be several steps along the journey towards gaining an MA in Education.

Whichever modules you choose you will engage in detailed analysis and evaluation of established and innovative theoretical perspectives and practice-based approaches to education. During your time at the University you will have an opportunity to study various aspects of education and engage with a wide range of teachers and researchers. Additionally modules will be available in teaching primary English and in leadership and management.

Within the overall framework of the Masters in Education, we also offer specialist pathways in Early Years and Mathematics.

As there are several routes through the MA Education part time, please feel free to contact James Underwood (Subject Leader Teachers’ CPD) directly on who can advise you on the best route for you.

Course modules (16/17)

-Young Children’s Rights and Participation
-Autism in the Early Years
-International Perspectives on Education
-School and Classroom Cultures
-Educational Leaderships
-Perspectives on BESD
-International Developments in Inclusive Practice
-Understanding Autistic Spectrum: Theoretical Perspectives
-Contemporary and international Issues in Early Years
-Supporting Parents and Developing Community
-Organisational based Project
-Research Methods
-Speech, Language and Communication needs
-Understanding Dyslexia: Identification, Curriculum and Teaching
-Principles and Practice in Action Research
-Key Concepts in Inclusion and Diversity
Investigating Individual Professional Practice 1 and 2
-Principles and Practice in Coaching and Mentoring
-Advanced Practice in Early Childhood Education
-Designing for the 21st Century Learning
-Research Thesis
-Dissertation
-Leading for Change
-Developing and Supporting Others

Methods of Learning

The course is taught through a series of seminars and workshops with additional small group and individual tutorials being provided for all students. All teaching takes place in small groups which enables students to engage in discussion and debate. In addition to the main programme, students will have opportunities to attend research seminars, day courses and other activities hosted by the Faculty of Education and Humanities.

The entire MA involves 140 hours of taught sessions, all of which are taught as interactive sessions involving activities and discussions. This means students will typically attend classes for 6 hours per week if studying full time, although this may vary depending on the modules taken. In addition full-time students will be expected to undertake a further 24 hours per week of private study and research. Part-time students taking the course over 3 years will be expected to do one third of this. You should however be aware that this is not consistently spread across the year and that at some points you may be working considerably more hours in a week. For all students there will also be the chance to attend additional optional sessions and presentations connected to the research undertaken within the Faculty of Education and Humanities.

Schedule

Part-time. Completion of the part-time MA usually takes three years. However, if master’s level (level 7 credits) have been attained on other courses including the PGCE, NPQH, or programmes run by the University of Northampton then it is possible to complete this MA in a shorter time.

Assessments

Depending on the route chosen, the course assessment involves essays, portfolios, presentations and small scale research projects. Your MA will always conclude with the production of a thesis or dissertation in which you will investigate, in depth, an aspect of your own practice.

Facilities and Special Features

-Modules relevant to those working in children’s and young people’s services.
-Recognised Postgraduate Professional Development for teachers.
-Modules for a range of professional and personal interests leading to named pathway awards in the future, including an MA in SEN & Inclusion.
-Modules can be taken ‘stand alone’ for professional development.
-Modules can build into three successive postgraduate awards from Certificate to Diploma and Masters.
-Modules relevant to those working in early years or children’s services.
-Modules designed to connect with different practitioners workplace context.
-A highly experienced and supportive tutor team all of whom are active researchers.
-Modules in Special Needs and Inclusion delivered by practitioners with a national reputation in the field.

Careers

Usually part-time students are already professionals in the field of education. However, this programme can open up opportunities for further development and promotion.

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Do you work for an international business? Would you like to improve your employment or promotion prospects? Southampton Solent University’s MSc International Business Management programme can equip you with the broad range of decision making, critical thinking and people management skills required to become a well-rounded and globally aware business executive. Read more

Overview

Do you work for an international business? Would you like to improve your employment or promotion prospects? Southampton Solent University’s MSc International Business Management programme can equip you with the broad range of decision making, critical thinking and people management skills required to become a well-rounded and globally aware business executive.

- Students study leadership, international commerce, management theory and organisational development – all within the context of global business.
- Students work alongside experienced academics, researchers and business specialists, benefiting from their first-hand industry insights.
- MSc International Business Management is a flexible course. Learners can spread the curriculum across one, two or three academic years.
- Solent’s strong links with industry help provide students with access to live briefs, case studies and guest speakers.
- Students who are completing the course alongside their regular career are encouraged to take part in work based learning – applying the skills they have learnt in the classroom directly to their workplace.
- Full-time students have the opportunity to complete a work placement. This may form the basis of their final research project.
- Postgraduate business management courses at Solent are recognised by the Chartered Management Institute.
- The course is delivered through a blend of distance learning, classroom sessions and independent study.

The industry -

The UK’s economic recovery is maintaining a strong pace, with some businesses feeling comfortable enough to focus on growth for the first time since the survival oriented recession years. A business management masters can help equip students with the skills and knowledge needed to capitalise on this growth and work in a range of different industries. The programme’s international focus puts students in a good position to pursue careers abroad, or with multinational businesses.

The programme -

Southampton Solent University’s international business management master's programme focuses on genuine industry insight and practical workplace skills. Our expert teaching team maintain strong links with industry professionals, giving students access to guest lectures, live assessment briefs and work placements.

The course itself covers three main themes: personal management development, applied contemporary international management theory, and management research. Individual units are designed to prepare students for the everyday challenges of decision-making and leadership roles.

Students benefit from our relationship with the Chartered Management Institute (CMI), and are able to hold a student membership throughout their studies. Graduates will be in a good position to pursue further study and achieve Chartered Manager (CMgr) status.

Course Content

Teaching, learning and assessment -

The course is taught through a mix of lectures, seminars, workshops and individual supervision.

Work experience -

You will have an opportunity to complete a placement, which may form the basis of your final project report. You can also choose to write about an organisation with which you are familiar, or your own workplace. For international students, this course provides a great opportunity to gain experience in UK industry.

Assessment -

Assessment is through individual coursework, including portfolios, written work, presentations and a final project.

Web-based learning -

Solent’s virtual learning environment is an integral part of learning and teaching on this course. It provides quick online access to assignments, lecture notes, case studies, suggested reading and peer/tutor interaction.

Why Solent?

What do we offer?

From a vibrant city centre campus to our first class facilities, this is where you can find out why you should choose Solent.

Facilities - http://www.solent.ac.uk/about/facilities/facilities.aspx

City living - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/southampton/living-in-southampton.aspx

Accommodation - http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/accommodation/accommodation.aspx

Career Potential

On completing this course, you’ll be well placed to take your management career to the next level within your current organisation or elsewhere.

Links with industry -

Where appropriate, you’ll have opportunities to apply course learning to your own, or other, organisations. This could involve case studies and live briefs (working on a real project with an industry client).

Transferable skills -

You will develop a range of transferable skills, encompassing group working, presentation, research and analysis, working to deadlines and applying knowledge to real-world scenarios.

Examples of employment obtained by recent graduates -

Recent graduates have pursued a variety of careers in roles such as:

- HR Manager
- Financial Consultant
- Purchasing Coordinator
- Project Developer
- Account Manager

Tuition fees

The tuition fees for the 2016/2017 academic year are:

UK and EU full-time fees: £5,665
International full-time fees £12,380

UK and EU part-time fees (2 years): £2,835 per year
International part-time fees (2 years): £6,190 per year

UK and EU part-time (blended) fees, year one: £1,895
UK and EU part-time (blended) fees, year two: £2,370
UK and EU part-time (blended) fees, year three: £1,420

International part-time (blended) fees, year one: £4,120
International part-time (blended) fees, year two: £5,150
International part-time (blended) fees, year three: £3,090

Graduation costs -

Graduation is the ceremony to celebrate the achievements of your studies. For graduates in 2015, there is no charge to attend graduation, but you will be required to pay for the rental of your academic gown (approximately £42 per graduate, depending on your award). You may also wish to purchase official photography packages, which range in price from £15 to £200+. Graduation is not compulsory, so if you prefer to have your award sent to you, there is no cost.
For more details, please visit: http://www.solent.ac.uk/studying/graduation/home.aspx

Next steps

Think you could succeed as a manager in international business? Southampton Solent’s postgraduate international business management programme is the perfect way to improve your communication skills, business acumen and worldwide industry knowledge.

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintlaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD167 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. Read more
This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

Why choose this course?

Founded in 1927, the School of Architecture at Oxford Brookes has established an international reputation for the quality of both its research and its teaching. As one of the largest architecture schools in the UK, with around 600 students and 70 staff, it plays a leading role in defining the national, and international, agenda in design education and research. The school enjoys an international reputation in research, in areas ranging from sustainable design to modular buildings and from design for well-being to vernacular architecture.

Staff in the school regularly secure research funding from the UK's research councils and the European Union as well as industry, with an annual research grant income averaging £1m in recent years. This programme provides RIBA/ARB Part 2.

Professional accreditation

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

This course in detail

Year 1 - Research into design
This year has a very strong emphasis on acquiring in-depth knowledge of an architecturally important field of study and utilising that knowledge in design. This is achieved by taking one of the six 'design specialisations'.

You choose which design specialisation is best for you. The specialisations on offer are deliberately highly diverse to cater for the changing nature of the profession in practice. This course produces graduates for the global market and as such requires a high level of commitment from staff and students.

The design specialisations are:
-Advanced Architectural Design
-International Architectural Regeneration and Development
-Development and Emergency Practice
-Sustainable Building: Performance and Design
-Research-led Design
-Urban Design.

Each of the research specialisations offers teaching from experts within that subject area, and links, through teaching focus and staff, to the five research clusters that are an invaluable resource within the School of architecture.

The five research clusters keep the specialisations at the cutting edge in terms of a global agenda. They are, in general terms, environmental design, technology, development and emergency practice, humanities and architectural design.

Each of the design specialisations include a design project or projects, to which you will apply your detailed learning.

In addition to the design specialisation the first year will, through the Research Philosophy for Design module, widen your thinking in terms of what constitutes research, test your critical thinking and improved your analytical abilities. All of these are essential tools and their enhancement will place you in a stronger position to undertake the design studio in the second year.

Your ability to represent your ideas in a coherent and focused manner is the remit for the Representation module. This module will identify your strengths and build up your weaknesses, both in terms of visual and verbal communication methods. You will be able to dedicate time to fine-tuning techniques or building from basics in sketching, model making, 2D and 3D CAD. Your presentation of methods and actual practice will enable you to build confidence in verbal communication skills.

The Management, Practice and Law module in year one looks at the landscapes within which these issues are being informed. This module is taught by practising architects who have first-hand experience of the issues under discussion. Through a series of workshops you will work on topics that are essential to the practice of architecture. Management, practice and law is part of the design delivery of the programme and you will be expected to approach the coursework from a design position. This module asks that you approach this subject with a very different mind-set than the traditional position.

Due to the diverse and preparative basis of this year it is compulsory for all students to pass all compulsory components of the Research into Design year in order to be progress to the Design and Technology year.

Year 2 - Design and technology
This year is structured to enable you to synthesise a broad range of complex cultural, aesthetic, research and technical factors, and design-specialisation learning, into your major design project and portfolio.

The year is spent participating in one of six design studios. All studios have control over their own programme of projects, and each has a different view of architectural culture and promotes different design methods. The design studios are taught by some of the brightest designers and tutors in the country and consequently their programmes demand high levels of creative and intellectual endeavour from you, as well as high levels of productivity. Their aim is to raise your design thinking, skills and production to the highest possible standard.

All six units present their projects for the year in the induction session and you are asked to select all six in order of preference. This system is to allow for an even distribution of students across all six units. Most students are allocated to their first choice of studio although there is no guarantee of a particular design unit - normally at worst you are allocated your second choice.

During the design and technology year, your design work must develop into technically ambitious architecture and be the subject of your compulsory Advanced Technology for Design module. This module designs through technology and fully complements and parallels your work in the design studio. There is a very strong emphasis here upon the creative possibilities for architectural technology. We ask for an open and experimental approach to technology, but also a clear understanding of its context and aims.

The staff delivering the teaching in the design studio unit and the Advanced Technology for Design module are made up from academics and practitioners. This energetic mix will challenge you to think about design and technology in a new manner, building confidence in ability, enabling deep thinking, and aiding you to define a personal design spirit.

Sitting alongside the design and technology is the second Management, Practice and Law module. This module builds on the learning and skills from the first year module and prepares you for stepping back into practice. As in the first year module this is learning is delivered by practicing architects. Through focus groups with architectural practices, this module figures in the skills that are seen as highly desirable for the ARB part 2 graduate to have when seeking employment.

Throughout the two years of the programme there will be interim reviews. This offers an opportunity to receive feedback from outside of your design studio or design specialisation. We have strong links with practice and architectural institutions and can attract the most able people to sit on our reviews.

This is a programme that aims to give you the skills for international practice.

As our courses are reviewed regularly, modules may vary from those listed here.

Teaching and learning

The unique nature of the Applied Design in Architecture offers you the opportunity to select an individual pathway that will create a distinctive graduate profile that is unique to you alone.

The ability to choose modules from within design specialisations offers you the prospect of defining your own position. You will find that you are being taught with, in most cases, direct entry master's students from countries around the world.

This aspect is complemented by the Year 2 design studio where you will engage with a distinctive agenda and experience a diversity of design specialisation thinking from students within your unit.

Self-directed learning is highly supported by staff in the School of Architecture. Personal choice engenders motivation and a high level of commitment, and the programme has been designed to embrace this aspect whilst clearly building on skills, thinking, application and design production to achieve a final portfolio of the highest standard.

Careers and professional development

The modules Management Practice, and Law 1 and 2, include guidance on the necessary professional skills that are required both for ARB Part 2 and for preparation in commencing ARB Part 3. The design studio generates a portfolio of work that not only demonstrates the learning for ARB Part 2 but also written, research and visual skills. The design portfolio is intended as the vehicle for students to synthesise all facets of their learning in order to seek practice employment.

In addition the school maintains a jobs wall that advertises vacancies locally, nationally and internationally.

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Short-term investment, life-long return, on your schedule. Compared to a traditional two-year programme, the Rome Business School’s 1-Year MBA provides a faster return on investment. Read more

12 months, start anytime, on campus or online

Short-term investment, life-long return, on your schedule. Compared to a traditional two-year programme, the Rome Business School’s 1-Year MBA provides a faster return on investment. It can be started anytime, either on campus or online (or both), offering the unique opportunity of fitting today’s professionals’ need for freedom and flexibility.

The programme is structured to enable you to continue to work full-time and study for your MBA part-time, connecting what you learn to current global and relevant organisational issues. This is ideal if you are unable to take significant time out of work to study and want greater flexibility over how, when and where you achieve your MBA qualification.

BENEFITS
• Start whenever you want, anytime during the year
• Designed for busy professionals wishing to combine work and study
• One-year duration
• Choose to attend lectures either on campus or online – or even both
• A global perspective, thanks to the four Double MBA options available in three different continents, even live online
• Small and International classes
• Individualized management coursework
• Lectures in the evenings and on Saturdays
• Grants available

TARGET RECIPIENTS
Our 1-year MBA course is aimed at all those who wish to acquire the skills and knowledge that will enable them to operate as general managers. Our 1-year MBA is designed for full-time working individuals. Courses are offered in the evenings and on Saturdays, allowing students to complete the programme without interrupting their careers or excessively disrupting their personal lives.
Students interested in taking part this MBA are typically:
• professionals interested in pursuing careers in general management, either in not-for-profit or for-profit businesses or as entrepreneurs or managers;
• professionals with specialist backgrounds who wish to acquire general management experience to progress in their careers;
• graduates with at least two years of relevant work experience who wish to consolidate their managerial knowledge;
• entrepreneurs who wish to develop their skills and competences to make their businesses grow internationally.

PROFESSIONAL OUTLETS
On completion of the Rome Business School’s MBA, you will have acquired the skills to be able to work – among other profiles – as:
• General Manager
• Project Manager
• Business Development Manager
• Human Resources Manager
• Marketing Manager
• Strategy Manager
• Finance Manager
• Management Consultant


COURSE CONTENT

The MBA is structured as a collection of ten courses and a final project work/final dissertation. Eight courses are core courses and two are electives, leading to specializations.

CORE COURSES
1. Accounting
2. Economics
3. Entrepreneurship and Creativity
4. Quantitative Business Methods and Decision Techniques
5. Strategic Management
6. Finance
7. Human Resources Management
8. Marketing Management

SPECIALIZATIONS

MBA with a specialization in Marketing
MBA with a specialization in Finance
MBA with a specialization in International Business
MBA with a specialization in Human Resources Management

INTERNATIONAL STUDY SEMINARS

If you are interested in learning more about specific markets, the Rome Business School’s MBA includes the opportunity for a one week International Study Seminar abroad in Brazil, Russia or the Ukraine at our partner universities and business schools.

A MULTICULTURAL ENVIRONMENT

Rome Business School is an International Institution that has already hosted students from more than 140 countries.

Rome Business School employs university lecturers, company trainers, consultants, managers and entrepreneurs chosen because of their proven experience and skills. The faculty has a strong multicultural inclination, with representatives from diverse backgrounds and nationalities. It will synergistically leaves you with a patrimony of knowledge for your personal development.

Rome Business School is developing an International didactic and corporate Network, thanks to several partnerships with business schools, universities and companies.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

All applicants must:
• at least hold a three-year degree
• have two years of relevant professional experience
• be fluent in the English language

Please note: for both the on-campus and distance learning options and in order to ensure a top quality training course, classes will consist of a maximum of 15 attendees.

NEXT STEPS
• Choose your starting date
• Apply with no further commitment and cost
• Go through our selection process and apply for a scholarship (estimated duration – 1 week)
• Choose your learning option (On campus or online)
• Choose your Double MBA with no additional cost (four options available)
• Start your MBA

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This course is for people who are working as physiotherapists, who wish to develop themselves and their profession. Read more
This course is for people who are working as physiotherapists, who wish to develop themselves and their profession. The MSc in Advancing Physiotherapy Practice aims to help you thrive in health and social contexts where the pace of change is high and professionals need to be dynamic and proactive to meet the needs of the people they work with.

The programme of study aims to be:

-Clinical: with a focus on highly topical subjects, ability to learn in and from the workplace, practical experience, and ability to take specialist clinical and practice routes: for example, musculoskeletal physiotherapy, neurological physiotherapy, cardiorespiratory physiotherapy, paediatric physiotherapy, leadership and management, and education.

- Flexible: with a determination to enable study for students who have a variety of circumstances, and who live in different countries. Two paces of study are available (full-time and part-time) and two modes of study (distance learning, and blended learning which requires attendance). The standard full-time pace is 18 months, which can be accelerated to 12 months where relevant requirements are met. Please see the section on study routes for further details.

- Supportive: with a focus on helping you to adjust to master’s level study at the start of the programme, to stay engaged with your profession throughout the course, and to increase your employability as you progress towards completion. Alongside modules you will be involved in a ‘Learning in Community Programme,’ which includes study skills training, social events, CPD opportunities such as Master Classes, and opportunities and guidance to increase your employability, including guidance on professional registration.

The knowledge and skills developed over the course are intended to enable you to lead and implement innovative change within physiotherapy workplaces in the UK and internationally.

Study routes

-Full-time with attendance (12-18 months): The full-time study route makes use of blended mode of learning which includes face-to-face contact supported by online resources. This is designed with international students in mind and offers attractive practical modules as well as opportunities to learn in clinical settings (see modules). The standard duration of the full-time route is 18 months. This is valuable if your priority is to use all opportunities to develop your professional standing and employability. If you wish to prioritise quick completion of your MSc Advancing Physiotherapy Practice, and meet requirements, you can accelerate it to 12 months duration.

-Part-time with attendance (3-7 years): You can study the MSc Advancing Physiotherapy Practice part-time, with a minimum duration of 3 years, and maximum duration of 7 years. If you study this route you can select modules that involve some attendance and some online study. For example, some modules are delivered with blocks of attendance and online study between these blocks. If you study part-time you can also choose to complete distance learning modules as part of your programme.

-Distance learning (part-time or full-time) (1-7 years): You can choose modules that enable you to complete your MSc Advancing Physiotherapy Practice entirely as distance learning . You can study distance learning at a full-time pace (12-18 months duration) or at a part-time pace (3-7 years).

Teaching, learning and assessment

We use a range of student-centred learning methods, including tutorials, seminars and practical classes, with facilitation of work-based learning and recognition of prior learning. Further specific strategies are used to enable distance learning.
Your performance will be assessed by coursework (assignments), presentations and practical examinations, and you are provided with structured support in learning how to develop and demonstrate your academic skills at a master’s level. Class sizes are usually 5-10 students.

Teaching hours and attendance

Each module that is studied on-campus will require you to attend classes and carry out independent work. Your attendance requirements at QMU will vary between semesters of study, but contact time might average about six hours per week over one academic year; this would be higher during taught modules. Whether you are studying distance learning or through a mixture of face-to-face contact and online work (blended learning), each 30-credit module will entail around 300 hours of student work. This includes contact with tutors (online or face-to-face), supported by independent learning. When thinking about the total amount of learning, for the full-time pace of study, you will undertake 120 credits of study over two 15-week semesters, followed by your dissertation. This suggests up to 40 hours per week of study. A student who chooses to study part-time may be undertaking, for example, 60 credits of study, which would equate to about 20 hours per week of study. The distance learning route can be studied part-time or full-time.

Links with industry/professional bodies

In order to design a flexible, clinical and supportive programme, we talked with current students, ex-students and employers internationally. We collaborate with many physiotherapists and managers locally to create opportunities for our students to contribute to the development of physiotherapy services during their programmes. This ensures the relevance of their studies, their professional development, and advancement of the physiotherapy profession. The MSc Physiotherapy is accredited by the UK’s Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (to be confirmed following recent revalidation). This course does not lead to HCPC registration. However, advice is given to assist the process of registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Course material will also help the student to develop knowledge and skills recognised by the HCPC.

MODULES

Please visit the QMU website for information.

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