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This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). Read more
This excellent course enables you to gain the wide range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC).

In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 100% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology is a three-year full-time, four-year part-time taught doctoral programme leading to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health Care Professions Council (HCPC), accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS), and recognition within the UK and the EU as a chartered counselling psychologist eligible to practice.

The programme offers a sound and marketable model, combining in-depth competency in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), strong humanistic values, and psychodynamic awareness. The course was re-accredited by the HCPC and the BPS in 2012. It was commended for the depth and breadth of the modules offered; a number of our modules were described as cutting-edge and very well suited to the current zeitgeist and employment market. These modules include a first-year module devoted to working with difference and diversity, and a third-year service evaluation research exercise.

Run by a dedicated team of HCPC registered and BPS accredited chartered counselling and clinical psychologists, this course offers wide-ranging and high quality clinical and research expertise to trainees. Course team members have between one and 11 years of post-qualification clinical experience, and two thirds hold PhD or professional doctoral titles. Two thirds of the staff are academically published authors.

While student numbers are growing, the team prides itself on retaining a small cohort each year of no more than 20 students. This enables us to offer you a relatively high volume of individual attention from staff. All students are assigned a personal tutor and two research supervisors. You are offered a relatively high proportion of research supervision (10 hours in Year 1 and 20 hours each year in Years 2 and 3); safe spaces for clinical group supervision and skills practice; and an experiential and workshop style of teaching and learning. Trainees and staff develop collaborative relationships in relation to learning and personal development.

The programme has a dedicated placements coordinator, and an extensive online placement provider database, accessible prior to training commencement. We offer a comprehensive placements induction in the first week of training, and we encourage and support you to be in placement or at interview stage with placement providers by the beginning of your training.

The first year of training is the equivalent of a Master’s year. Students who exit at the end of Year 1 are eligible for an MSc in Psychological Therapies. This MSc offers eligibility to register with the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), leading to clinical practice in either in public, private or third sector organisations. However, the course has high student retention rates, with the majority of students continuing from the MSc level into the doctoral level of training in Years 2 and 3. Student satisfaction within the programme is very high; feedback forms regularly comment on the high quality and breadth of teaching, the clinical and research expertise of the lecturers, and the dedication of the staff, both at a personal and professional level. Our students feel valued and attended to by the teaching team because the size of each cohort allows for a more tailored experience for each student.

Through postgraduate teaching and workshops across the wider applied psychology subject area, London Met counselling psychology trainees develop advanced levels of knowledge and skills in a broad range of qualitative and quantitative psychological research methods. The course emphasises criticality, epistemological critique and reflexivity across all research teaching and learning. Extensive support in the form of individual and group supervision and teaching is offered, alongside methodology learning, to support trainees in undertaking a piece of doctoral level research that will make an original contribution to the professional practice of counselling psychology, and more widely.

As trainees you will develop a wide range of intellectual and practical skills and knowledge. The training has a solid track record of trainees emerging as robust, sophisticated, and highly employable practitioners of counselling psychology. In recent years, we are proud that a number of our trainees have won BPS Division of Counselling Psychology trainee prizes for written assignments and research poster presentations.

The principle aims and achievements of the course are to produce graduates who are:
-Competent, informed, reflective, ethical and professionally sound practitioners of counselling psychology who are able to work in a range of settings and are committed to their own on-going personal and professional development
-Able to understand, develop and apply models of advanced psychological inquiry and research that enable the creation of new knowledge and which recognise the complex nature of human experience and relationships
-Able to adopt a questioning and evaluative approach to the philosophy, practice, research and theory that constitutes counselling psychology and aware of the wider social, cultural and political domains within which counselling psychology operates
-In possession of a set of skills and competencies that are transferable to a wide variety of professional contexts and which enhance employability
-Able to demonstrate the range of counselling psychology competencies needed to be eligible to apply for chartered status with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC)

Many students are conducting research in collaboration with National Health Service (NHS) Trusts or non-governmental organisations (NGOs). Graduates find permanent employment within a few months post-qualification, with many trainees holding part-time clinical employment whilst they are in the final year of the training because their clinical skills and knowledge are of such a high standard. Other graduates from the programme find work in academia in visiting or permanent teaching posts or as research fellows.

The course is involved in on-going in-house events and conferences such as CultureShock, and in research and clinical collaborations with five NHS trusts. The programme is also involved in research and in the training of clinical staff with the Freedom from Torture Foundation and Khulisa, both community based organisations close to the Holloway Campus. The programme is also collaborating with the School of Social Sciences and School of Social Professions to link interpreters with clinicians and to establish training inside and outside the University on working with interpreters in mental health settings.

Assessment

A wide range of assessment methods is used on the programme. In Year 1 you'll complete seven master's level assignments, including a reflective essay, case formulation, process report, examination and two short research assignments using qualitative and quantitative methodologies.

You'll also complete a 7,000-word reflexive critical literature review and a 3,000-word proposal towards the end of Year 1. Your proposal must demonstrate an adequate basis for a doctoral level research project for you to proceed into Year 2 of the programme. Year 1 is the most intensive period of assessment on the programme.

If you progress to Year 2 you'll complete an extended clinical case study, integrative process analysis and theoretical essay at the end of the year, reflecting cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic learning. At the end of Year 3 a similar assignment is completed, reflecting a trans-theoretical, pluralistic perspective. You should complete your research project by the end of Year 3, submitting a 25,000 word thesis and subsequently participating in a viva voce examination.

You'll receive research supervision to guide your research throughout the programme. Research progress is formally monitored and evaluated through the submission of annual reports to the Research and Postgraduate Office in Years 2 and 3.

You are required to complete a minimum of 450 clinical hours in a range of placements under supervision over the duration of the programme, as well as a minimum of 60 hours of your own personal therapy.

Supervisors complete six-monthly practice competency evaluations, which enable bidirectional feedback and reflection on your progress and continuing professional development in your practice placements. Your personal and professional development is individually monitored and supported throughout the programme via annual reviews and appraisals with a tutor from the programme team.

Professional accreditation

The Professional Doctorate in Counselling Psychology leads to a doctoral qualification that automatically confers professional registration with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and accreditation as a fully qualified chartered counselling psychologist with the British Psychological Society.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advanced Research Design and Analysis for Psychology (core, 20 credits)
-Counselling Psychology Practice and Development (core, 20 credits)
-Professional and Ethical Issues (core, 20 credits)
-Psychological Knowledge and Models of Therapy (core, 20 credits)
-Research Project and Critical Skills (core, 60 credits)
-Therapeutic and Reflective Skills (core, 20 credits)
-Working with Difference and Diversity (core, 20 credits)

Year 2 modules include:
-Advanced Psychological Research (core, 160 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 1 (core, 100 credits)
-Advanced Psychological Theory and Practice 2 (core, 100 credits)

After the course

Career opportunities for counselling psychologists include posts in a variety of areas. These include National Health Service (NHS) settings such as primary care, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services, community mental health, drug and alcohol, rehabilitation, eating and personality disorder services, as well as the prison service, voluntary sector, private practice, academia, training, supervision, management and consultancy.

Graduates from the programme frequently go on work in one or more of these areas. Some have gone on to provide practice placements or to supervise or teach students on the programme. The range of advanced clinical and research skills and abilities gained through the course prepare graduates to undertake work in a variety of fields of activity.

Moving to one campus

Between 2016 and 2020 we're investing £125 million in the London Metropolitan University campus, moving all of our activity to our current Holloway campus in Islington, north London. This will mean the teaching location of some courses will change over time.

Whether you will be affected will depend on the duration of your course, when you start and your mode of study. The earliest moves affecting new students will be in September 2017. This may mean you begin your course at one location, but over the duration of the course you are relocated to one of our other campuses. Our intention is that no full-time student will change campus more than once during a course of typical duration.

All students will benefit from our move to one campus, which will allow us to develop state-of-the-art facilities, flexible teaching areas and stunning social spaces.

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Our part-time blended learning MSc Occupational Medicine course provides an overview of the whole spectrum of medicine and hygiene within the workplace. Read more

Our part-time blended learning MSc Occupational Medicine course provides an overview of the whole spectrum of medicine and hygiene within the workplace.

The course is aimed at GPs who want to gain an academic qualification in occupational medicine and doctors already working in the field - especially in specialist training posts - who want to prepare for professional exams with the Faculty of Occupational Medicine (FOM).

This MSc is also suitable for doctors in other disciplines who have an interest in occupational medicine.

You will benefit from access to a range of specialist knowledge and resources within occupational health and examine the evidence on which occupational health practice is based.

The course takes place in a research-enriched environment and, for those progressing to the third year of the MSc, you will have the opportunity to undertake research-based activities relevant to occupational health, including formulating a research question, designing and executing an appropriate study and drawing valid conclusions through writing a dissertation. 

Our course follows the syllabus requirements of the FOM (London and Ireland).

Aims

This course aims to provide you with the information required by medical practitioners working in the field of occupational medicine, and to allow you to pursue an academic qualification in this subject.

We also aim to provide you with the benefit of blended learning methodology, which allows you to apply the knowledge gained during your day-to-day work.

Special features

Compliant course content

This course adheres to the syllabus requirements of the FOM, RCP (London) and RCP (Ireland).

Teaching and learning

The course comprises a blend of specially commissioned written materials in electronic format (PDF), together with interactive teaching material, all delivered via the University's virtual learning environment, Blackboard.

In Year 1, you are required to attend in Manchester for a one-day seminar associated with Module 1 in Month 3, and the same for Module 2 in month 5 for September starters, in Month 6 for April starters and for one exam day in Month 10.

You are allocated to tutorial groups for Modules 4 to 8, each supported by a specialist in occupational medicine. Tutorials are delivered via telephone or web conference.

In Year 2, you are required to attend in Manchester for a four-day practical course in Month 5 and for one exam day in Month 10.

In Year 3, you are required to attend a three-day MSc dissertation course held at the University in Month 1.

Some components of the course are held jointly with students on the MSc Occupational Hygiene course.

You can view  sample study materials  and  MSc abstracts and papers .

Coursework and assessment

All taught course units will be assessed via examinations held at the University at intervals throughout the course, and the third year will be assessed via submission of a dissertation.

Assessment is by eight examination papers, one per course module. The first will be sat at Seminar 1 (Year 1, Month 3) and the second at Seminar 2 (Year 1, Month 5 for September starters and Month 6 for April starters). The remaining Year 1 assessments will be sat in Month 10. For Year 2, assessments will be held in Month 5 and 10.

If you wish to proceed to the MSc, you are also required to complete a third year, during which you will attend a mandatory three-day residential course (in Month 1) and prepare a dissertation. For doctors in approved training posts, the dissertation may also be eligible for submission for the MFOM.

Course unit details

YEAR 1

Module 1: Foundation for Postgraduate Practice

  • Occupational Health in Perspective
  • Introduction to Occupational Health Law
  • Introduction to Communication
  • Ethical Considerations in Practice
  • Introduction to Toxicology
  • Introduction to Occupational Hygiene
  • Introduction to Lighting
  • Introduction to Temperature and Work
  • Introduction to Noise and Vibration
  • Introduction to Hazardous Substances

Module 2: Fitness for Work

  • Recognising Occupational Disease
  • Introduction to Occupational Dermatology
  • Introduction to Musculoskeletal Disorders
  • Introduction to the Respiratory System
  • Introduction to Occupational Infections
  • Mental Ill Health and Stress at Work
  • Introduction to Epidemiology
  • Health Assessment, Surveillance and Screening
  • Sickness Absence
  • Disability Assessment

Module 3: Health and Workability

  • Workplace and Clinical Assessment Skills: the Portfolio
  • Advanced Occupational Health Law
  • Health Promotion
  • Ageing and Employment
  • Ergonomics
  • Shift Work and Daily Rhythms
  • Rehabilitation and Return to Work
  • Choosing a Research Topic and Literature Review
  • Developing the Research Question
  • Common Mental Health Problems and the Workplace
  • Introduction to Audit

Module 4: Aspects of Good Professional Behaviour

  • Management
  • Professional Behaviour/Leadership and Teamwork
  • Communication
  • Clinical Governance
  • Practical Applications in Quality and Audit
  • Standard Setting
  • Business Needs in the Provision of an Occupational Health Service

YEAR 2

Module 5: Understanding Physical Agents

  • Noise
  • Vibration
  • Radiation
  • Compressed Air Work and Commercial Diving
  • Temperature and Work
  • Light and Vision

Module 6: Management of Occupationally Related Disease

  • Respiratory Disorders
  • Occupational Dermatoses
  • Musculoskeletal Disorders
  • Occupational Cancers
  • Aviation Medicine
  • Occupational Infections
  • Medically Unexplained Symptoms

Module 7: Research Methods and Data Analysis

  • Epidemiology and Statistics
  • Life Long Learning
  • Evidence Based Practice
  • Critical Appraisal
  • Social Research Methods
  • Information Technology

Module 8: Management of Workplace Hazards

  • Industry and Environment
  • Occupational Hygiene Practice
  • Food Safety and Hygiene
  • Prevention of Accidents
  • Principles of Toxicology
  • Occupational Health in a Global Market


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Applications to start in October 2017 are now closed. Applications to start in October 2018 will open in September. Read more

Oxford 1+1 MBA

Applications to start in October 2017 are now closed. Applications to start in October 2018 will open in September.

The 1+1 programme is a unique, two-year postgraduate experience which offers you the opportunity to combine the depth of our specialised, one-year MSc in Sociology with the breadth of Saïd Business School’s top-ranking, one-year MBA. As a result, you will embark from Oxford with the skills to translate specific domain knowledge into practical and innovative solutions to the many challenges facing our 21st Century world.

Benefits of the Oxford 1+1 MBA programme include:
• training across disciplines, drawing upon the resources of a world-class university;
• development of two complementary networks of peers and alumni through Oxford's collegiate experience; and
• upon completion you will be identified by employers as having detailed subject knowledge, combined with highly developed delivery skills.

Candidates accepted to the 2017-19 1+1 programme will undertake the MSc in Sociology during the 2017-18 academic year and their MBA during 2018-19.

Applying to the 1+1 MBA

To be considered, interested candidates must apply to and meet the entry requirements for both the Oxford MBA and the MSc in Sociology. More information about master's course application deadlines and entry requirements are available via the MSc in Sociology course page (http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/msc-sociology). Information about the MBA is available on the MBA course page (http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/graduate/courses/mba).

When completing the online 1+1 MBA application via the Saïd Business School website, please make sure to select ‘1+1’ under the programme of interest.

Funding

In addition, the Oxford Pershing Square Graduate Scholarship is available for up to five extraordinary 1+1 students who are committed to addressing world-scale social challenges. The Scholarship provides full funding for tuition, college fees and living expenses for both the MSc and MBA year.

The final application deadline for the Oxford Pershing Square Graduate Scholarship is fast approaching on 17 March 2017.

- See more at: http://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/programmes/degrees/1plus1/pershing-square-scholarship

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Our part-time blended learning MSc Occupational Hygiene course will equip you with a wide range of interdisciplinary knowledge and skills to work in areas related to occupational hygiene, culminating in an academic qualification accredited by the Faculty of Occupational Hygiene (FOH) within the British Occupational Hygiene Society (BOHS). Read more

Our part-time blended learning MSc Occupational Hygiene course will equip you with a wide range of interdisciplinary knowledge and skills to work in areas related to occupational hygiene, culminating in an academic qualification accredited by the Faculty of Occupational Hygiene (FOH) within the British Occupational Hygiene Society (BOHS).

As a graduate of this course, you will have knowledge necessary to recognise, evaluate and control hazards in the workplace, including chemical, physical and biological agents.

In the taught component of the course, the emphasis is on acquiring a thorough understanding of the theoretical principles and research methodologies underpinning the topic covered by each unit.

Emphasis is placed on the development of your critical appraisal skills and your capacity to lead an occupational health team at a senior management level.

The dissertation provides an opportunity to develop experience in applying these principles and research methods to a problem of particular interest to you.

Aims

The primary aim of the course is to deliver academic training in disciplines relevant to occupational hygiene. The course aims to provide you with:

  • an appreciation of the skills necessary to recognise, evaluate and control hazardous substances in the workplace, encompassing hazards such as chemical, physical (eg. noise, radiation), biological and ergonomic agents;
  • an introduction to the wide variety of aspects covered within the occupational hygiene discipline such as legislation, toxicological basis for standard setting, methods commonly used to evaluate hazardous agents, and related and overlapping health professions;
  • an academic qualification that is accredited by the Faculty of Occupational Hygiene (FOH) within the British Occupational Hygiene Society (BOHS);
  • a good foundation on which to build and extend your knowledge of occupational hygiene during the changes and developments which lie in the years ahead.

The MSc aims to:

  • encourage critical evaluation of ideas and concepts in occupational hygiene and exploration of other philosophical and practical approaches to minimising ill health in the workplace;
  • develop powers of critical appraisal, analytical thinking and logical argument.

Teaching and learning

The course comprises a blend of specially commissioned written materials in electronic format (PDF), together with interactive teaching material, all delivered via the University's virtual learning environment, Blackboard.

In Year 1, you are required to attend in Manchester for a 1 day seminar associated with Module 1 in month 3, and the same for Module 2 in month 5 and for one exam day in month 10.

You are allocated to tutorial groups for Modules 4 to 8, each supported by a specialist in occupational hygiene. Tutorials are delivered via telephone or web conference.

In Year 2, you are required to attend in Manchester for a four-day practical course in Month 5 and for one exam day in Month 10.

In Year 3, you are required to attend a three-day MSc dissertation course held at the University in Month 1.

All examinations are held at the University.

Some components of the course are held jointly with students on our MSc Occupational Medicine course.

You can view  sample study materials  and  MSc abstracts and papers .

Coursework and assessment

All taught course units will be assessed via examinations held at the University at intervals throughout the course, and the third year will be assessed via submission of a dissertation.

Assessment is by eight examination papers, one per course module. The first will be taken at Seminar 1 (Year 1, Month 3) and the second at Seminar 2 (Year 1, Month 5). The remaining Year 1 assessments will be taken in Month 10. For Year 2, assessments will be held in Month 5 and 10.

If you wish to proceed to the MSc, you are also required to complete a third year, during which you will attend a mandatory three day residential course (in Month 1) and prepare a dissertation.

Course unit details

YEAR 1

Module 1: Introduction to Hazards, Risks and the Working Environment

  • Occupational Health in Perspective
  • Introduction to Occupational Health Law
  • Historical Development of Occupational Health
  • Hazards and Risks
  • Introduction to Toxicology
  • Introduction to Occupational Hygiene
  • Introduction to Lighting
  • Introduction to Temperature and Work
  • Introduction to Noise and Vibration
  • Introduction to Hazardous Substances

Module 2: Occupational Ill Health

  • Occupational Dermatoses
  • Respiratory Disorders
  • Musculoskeletal Disorders
  • Occupational Cancers
  • Stress Disorders
  • Work-Related Infections
  • Introduction to Epidemiology
  • Health Assessment, Surveillance and Screening
  • Biological Monitoring

Module 3: Health and Workability

  • Workplace Assessment Skills
  • Advanced Occupational Health Law
  • Ergonomics
  • Shift Work and Daily Rhythms
  • Solvents
  • Plastics and Polymers
  • Pesticides
  • Pharmaceuticals and Fine Chemicals 
  • Choosing a Research Topic and Literature Review
  • Developing the Research Question

Module 4: Hazardous Substances

  • Factors in Dust Exposure
  • Exposure in Manufacturing Processes
  • Air Sampling
  • Exposure Evaluation/Exposure Modelling
  • Sample Analysis
  • Occupational Exposure for Airborne Substances

YEAR 2

Module 5: Understanding Physical Agents

  • Noise
  • Vibration
  • Radiation
  • Compressed Air Work and Commercial Diving
  • Temperature and Work
  • Light and Vision

Module 6: Control of Workplace Hazards

  • Process Control Strategy
  • Ventilation
  • Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Human Behaviours
  • Dermal Exposure

Module 7: Research Methods and Data Analysis

  • Epidemiology and Statistics
  • Evidence Based Practice
  • Critical Appraisal
  • Social Research Methods
  • Information Technology

Module 8: Management of Workplace Hazards

  • Industry and Environment
  • Occupational Hygiene Practice
  • Food Hygiene
  • Prevention of Accidents
  • Principles of Toxicology
  • Global Aspects of Occupational Hygiene


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The William Harvey Research Institute is currently the UK’s largest academic pharmacological research institute, with 350 scientists and clinicians from more than 40 nations, and has a long history of training talented scientists for careers in cardiovascular sciences and translational research (http://www.whri.qmul.ac.uk/). Read more
The William Harvey Research Institute is currently the UK’s largest academic pharmacological research institute, with 350 scientists and clinicians from more than 40 nations, and has a long history of training talented scientists for careers in cardiovascular sciences and translational research (http://www.whri.qmul.ac.uk/). In the UK Research Assessment Exercise (2014) 90% of our research was rated as world leading or internationally excellent. We are now seeking outstanding life sciences graduates for our BHF funded 4 year MRes/PhD programme to commence in October 2017.

Successful applicants will join our Translational Cardiovascular Academy and undertake an MRes course for the first year of study offering students the foundation knowledge and abilities they will need to proceed to their PhD training. The year will be divided into distinct sections, the first being dedicated to the teaching of essential skills followed by laboratory-based research projects. Upon successful completion of their MRes studies, students will continue to study for a 3 year PhD working with their chosen supervisor within the William Harvey Research Institute or wider medical school and college.

FUNDING

Successful applicants will receive an award covering tuition fees and a bursary at the applicable BHF rates (currently £22,278 for the first year).

There are currently no residency requirements for BHF studentships (see BHF website for more detailed information, https://www.bhf.org.uk/research/information-for-researchers/what-we-fund/phd-studentships

All students will be based in the attractive Charterhouse Square campus in the City of London with access to exceptional scientific and recreational facilities.

This training will be an invaluable foundation for individuals wishing to pursue a career in industry or academic research in the area of cardiovascular science.


For further information, please see our website: http://www.whri-bhf4yrphd.org

You can also contact the course co-ordinator: Prof Tim Warner,


As the first year of the course requires attendance on our MRes course please make your application online to the following programme:

http://www.qmul.ac.uk/postgraduate/taught/coursefinder/courses/121370.html

Please indicate on your application form under the Funding section (page 6) that you are applying for funding under ‘WHRI/BHF’.

The closing date for applications is Tuesday 18th April 2017

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Diploma MSc is a leading provider of online Diabetes courses. Working in conjunction with the University of South Wales, Diploma MSc offer 1 year part time Diabetes Diploma courses and Diabetes MSc courses that can be completed entirely online. Read more

Diabetes Courses Online

Diploma MSc is a leading provider of online Diabetes courses. Working in conjunction with the University of South Wales, Diploma MSc offer 1 year part time Diabetes Diploma courses and Diabetes MSc courses that can be completed entirely online.

With a team of over 40 expert course tutors we deliver online Diabetes courses to the highest standard and at affordable prices.

Studying with Diploma MSc allows you to advance your career in Diabetes in your own time with 24/7 access through our online portal. The Diabetes Diploma course is for individuals who wish to have a greater understanding of the care of people with Diabetes, particularly General Practitioners, Practice Nurses, Diabetes Specialist Nurses, Podiatrists, Pharmacists, Dieticians and Pharmaceutical Representatives.

Entry Requirements

Postgraduate Diploma

Health professionals working within a clinical setting, both UK and overseas, with a related Healthcare Science degree (including international qualifications) are eligible to apply for the PG Diploma course.

Applicants should submit copies of the following with their application:
qualification certificates
one written reference
English language qualification (IELTS 6.5 or equivalent) please see University of South Wales for further details

MSc

Health professionals, both UK and overseas, wishing to further their education who have previously completed a Postgraduate Diploma in Diabetes from the University of South Wales are eligible to apply for this MSc Diabetes course online.

Applicants can also apply for our MSc qualification as a two-year course (undertaking the Postgraduate Diploma in their first year).

Applicants can also enter the MSc programmes if they have completed a Postgraduate Diploma in Diabetes from another UK University, having successfully acquired 120 M level Credits.

Applicants should submit copies of the following with their application:
qualification certificates
one written reference

Diploma in Diabetes Course Information

Our Diploma in Diabetes course is accredited by the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and has been recognised by the International Diabetes Federation.

The online diabetes course is designed to be practical and clinically focused. On completion of the online Diploma in Diabetes, students have:

- a greater understanding of the multidisciplinary approach to the care of people with Diabetes.
- experience of developing local guidelines, patient information literature or care pathways which will be part of their individual and group activities.
- a greater confidence and understanding of the management of people with Diabetes through case studies and discussion.
- improved critical analysis of published data and data interpretation.
- applicants will typically be health professionals who have a day to day exposure to people with Diabetes. They may be part of a team which delivers care, a leader of that team or an individual who treats people with Diabetes.

The Diabetes Diploma course is designed to be relevant to all health professionals who might manage people with Diabetes and is particularly relevant to:

General Practitioners, Practice Nurses, Diabetes Specialist Nurses, Podiatrists, Pharmacists, Dieticians and Pharmaceutical Representatives

Course Structure

The postgraduate Diabetes Diploma course is based on the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) Curriculum for Diabetes health professional education. The online course lasts one calendar year and is a part time distance learning course. It consists of 6 modules per year, each of 6 weeks duration.

Module 1 - Principles of Diabetes
Module 2 - Approaches to Care
Module 3 - Promoting Self Care
Module 4 - Management of Diabetes
Module 5 - Complications (microvascular)
Module 6 - Complications (macrovascular)
Assessment

Each of the 6 modules has the same assessment format. Due to the online nature of the course, students are expected to login and participate in the course regularly throughout the module (ideally on a daily basis).

Students are split into groups of 10-15 students and are assigned a dedicated expert tutor who:

Facilitates clinical case discussions with the group.
Monitors, assesses and marks each student throughout the module.
Students use the skills gained during the lectures to engage with the different activities (see below).
Clinical case scenarios with case based discussion - 40%
Individual learning portfolio - 10%
Group/individual activity - 20%
Case based examination - 30%
Teaching Methods

The lecture series are delivered by the faculty and tutors, they are a pre-course organiser, giving students the tools required to undertake the online course such as:

Scientific writing.
Levels of evidence.
Harvard referencing.
Reflective writing.
The lectures series give an opportunity to meet face to face with tutors/other students prior to the online course.

Students are not required to attend the lectures, however those who do benefit as they get a "jump start" to the course. Students who are not able to attend, should request a skype/telephone call to orientate them onto the course and are advised to review the lecture slides.

Diabetes MSc Course Information

This Diabetes MSc course is accredited by the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and has been recognised by the International Diabetes Federation.

The Diabetes MSc course provides a progression route for the Postgraduate Diabetes Diploma course offered by the University.

The MSc in Diabetes runs over 1 calendar year. Students undertake an initial 12 week online module to develop their skills in critical appraisal and knowledge of research methodologies.

Diabetes MSc Course Structure

Module 1 - Research Methodologies and Critical Appraisal (compulsory module)
Module 2 - Professional Project or Independent Prescribing Module
Teaching Methods

Students are expected in the first 8 weeks to interact with their tutor on a weekly basis. Students select a specific project and submit a project summary/proposal (approximately 1500 words).

Once the proposal has been approved, the professional project (10,500 words) itself is then completed through online guidance and supervision offered by the tutor. The student and tutor will interact regularly (weekly) on the dedicated students/tutor discussion area or through any other means of communication deemed appropriate by both parties (telephone/SKYPE/email). Note of any verbal communication with the tutor is recorded in the student's journal by the student.

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Do you want to lead society towards a more energy-efficient future, enhance your business acumen, and further develop your technical and design ability? The MEng course develops your communication and entrepreneurial skills, and prepares you for a range of high-end careers in electrical and electronic engineering. Read more
Do you want to lead society towards a more energy-efficient future, enhance your business acumen, and further develop your technical and design ability? The MEng course develops your communication and entrepreneurial skills, and prepares you for a range of high-end careers in electrical and electronic engineering. This course, which meets the full academic requirements for Chartered Engineer status, is accredited by The Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

You will develop highly practical skills and learn through doing. You'll access one of the largest undergraduate laboratory spaces in the country, which you can use to further your own understanding of communications, electronics and renewable energy technologies. You will benefit from free IET membership (whilst at University) as the University is an IET Academic Partner. You will further your knowledge with a placement after successfully completing year two.

Key features

-Benefit from outstanding teaching: in the 2016 National Student Survey 91 per cent of our final year students said that “The course is intellectually stimulating”.*
-Draw on our strong industry links and benefit from industry participation in course development, delivery and project sponsorship.
-Take part in our final year student project open day showcasing the excellence of the engineering skills development and the high levels of achievement of our undergraduates, with many industrially sponsored prizes awarded.
-Develop highly practical skills and learn through doing.
-Take advantage of our flexible course, allowing you to switch between electronics and robotics until your final year, as your interests develop.
-Immerse yourself in a degree accredited by the Institution for Engineering and Technology (IET) on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng).
-Benefit from free IET membership (whilst at University) as the University is an IET Academic Partner.
-Joining our MEng course means working towards an honours degree that provides the shortest route to professional and chartered status.
-Challenge yourself. Final year MEng students work in groups to undertake a major design project that will give them the opportunity to experience a broad selection of strategic, ethical, environmental, management, operational, logistical, technical, financial, contractual and team-working challenges.
-Further your knowledge with a placement after successfully completing stage 2 or between the final two years of the MEng course.
-Receive an Apple iPad along with your core e-text books to support your learning.
-Access one of the largest undergraduate laboratory spaces in the country, which you can use to further your own understanding of communications, electronics and renewable energy technologies.

Course details

Year 1
In the first year you'll use our well-equipped laboratories to develop your knowledge and practical problem solving skills. From the start of your studies you'll find that there is an emphasis on learning by doing, and group project work will enable you to develop your problem solving and communication skills. An integrating project will encompass business and technical skills, and focus on activities that are typical of a start-up company.

Core modules
-ELEC143 Embedded Software in Context
-BPIE112 Stage 1 Electrical/Robotics Placement Preparation
-ELEC141 Analogue Electronics
-ELEC142 Digital Electronics
-ELEC144 Electrical Principles and Machines
-MATH187 Engineering Mathematics

Optional modules
-ELEC137PP Electronic Design and Build
-ROCO103PP Robot Design and Build

Year 2
You'll develop a greater understanding of underlying engineering principles and circuit design methods in the second year. Again, we place an emphasis on team work and you'll have the opportunity to do both group and individual presentations of your projects. You'll use industrial standard software tools for design and simulation in preparation for your final year individual project or for your optional placement year.

Core modules
-MATH237 Engineering Mathematics and Statistics
-BPIE212 Stage 2 Electrical/Robotics Placement Preparation
-ELEC239 Communication Systems
-ROCO218 Control Engineering
-ELEC237 Power Electronics and Generation
-ELEC240 Embedded Systems
-ELEC241 Real Time Systems

Optional placement year
You can enhance your studies with relevant experience by taking an optional placement year in the UK, France, Germany and Japan. Placements give you the opportunity to put theory into practice, and are excellent opportunity to seek final year sponsorship. Many of our graduates have been offered permanent jobs with their placement company.

Core modules
-BPIE332 Electrical Industrial Placement

Year 4
Year 3 (or Year 4 if you took an optional placement year) is an exciting opportunity to develop an individual project. You'll consolidate your knowledge, explore and evaluate new technologies, and demonstrate your communication skills in the oral and written presentation of your project. Previous project have included a landmine detection system, CreatoBot (a modular robotic system) and DishDynamics (Global Ordinance And Targeting System [GOATS]).

Core modules
-ELEC345 High Speed Communications
-ELEC347 Information and Communication Signal Processing
-ELEC349 Design and Control of Renewable Energy Technology
-PROJ324 Individual Project
-ELEC351 Advanced Embedded Programming

Final year
Your final year includes additional technical modules and a large interdisciplinary design project. Past projects have included designing a product that involved a local company and a central government department, the challenge was to build a prototype system, which was showcased at the Project Open Day. This project will most likely result in the formation of a real company (later in the year). You also have the possibility of continuing your studies to MSc level in the same academic year.

Core modules
-PROJ515 MEng Project
-ELEC512 Nanotechnology and Nanoelectronics
-ELEC518 Digital and Wireless Communications
-ELEC514 Advanced Power Systems

Every undergraduate taught course has a detailed programme specification document describing the course aims, the course structure, the teaching and learning methods, the learning outcomes and the rules of assessment.

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules.

A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawdevgov/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or for years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Development and Governance specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a course offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the course will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each course may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintcompcomlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International and Comparative Commercial Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAD106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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This multidisciplinary programme will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the interrelationships between areas of finance and the global economy as they play out in a rapidly evolving international environment. Read more

This multidisciplinary programme will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the interrelationships between areas of finance and the global economy as they play out in a rapidly evolving international environment.

This programme examines key issues from both a business and economic perspective, including how multinational corporations leverage financial markets when seeking to exploit international business opportunities, the management challenges presented, and the relevance of these to financial and capital markets.

Students will gain an understanding of the international business environment and its competitive and investment climate. Using frameworks and methodologies, students will also investigate the interaction between firm strategies, economic policies and the changing international environment.

Why Henley?

  • Consistently maintain highest standards: Henley is in top 1% of business schools worldwide to hold accreditation from all three bodies in the UK, Europe and US
  • Excellent networking potential : 72,000 Henley alumni members in 150 countries
  • High calibre students: always oversubscribed, 1,000 ambitious new Masters students join Henley each year
  • Award winning campus: beautiful, green, 134 hectares, with state of the art facilities
  • World-leading faculty: widely published, frequently asked for expert comment by media and to speak at events
  • Henley is proud to be part of the University of Reading. The University is ranked within the top 200 universities worldwide (Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2016/17 and QS World University Rankings 2018) and 98% of the research is rated as being of international standard.

Course content

Module descriptions are correct for modules taught in the academic year 2017/18. Optional module listings are indicative, and may be subject to change.

Compulsory Modules

Optional Modules

In addition students must choose optional modules up to the value of 60 credits. Students must choose at least 20 credits from section B and section C from the lists below and a further 20 credits from either section B or C.      

Section B:

Section C:

Assessment

Exams, applied project and individual and group assignments

Careers and accreditations

Graduates of the MSc International Business and Finance follow a variety of career paths upon graduation. These include roles in finance or general management, working for a range of employers such as large corporations or multinational enterprises, financial institutions, banks, securities companies or government agencies.

Our graduates tell us that the programme gives them the key skills and knowledge required to build a career in finance in multinational enterprises, financial institutions or government agencies.



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The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

Career opportunities include:

- Further historical research (PhD)
- Research positions in government institutions, NGOs, journalism, etc.

This is the only Master-level programme in Historical Research Methods focusing on the study of Asia and Africa in the UK. It provides the unique opportunity to develop and carry out a research project under the guidance of regional specialists and thus an ideal preparation for a research degree. It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-historial-research-methods-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take 4 course units over the period of their programme of study (i.e. 2 or 4 years). This includes the core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit), which is taught on a one-to-one basis by the dissertation supervisor, the compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa (1 unit), a minor course or courses (to the value of 1 unit) from a list of approved options and/or a language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures, and a 10,000 word dissertation (1 unit).

In the intensive language pathways, students take 2 intensive language units and one history unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take 1 language unit and 2 history units and complete work on their dissertation (1 unit). For example, Year 1: 2 intensive language units + compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa; Year 2: 1 intensive language unit + core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit) + minor courses to the value of 1 unit + dissertation.

Aims and Outcomes

- Knowledge of a variety of theoretical issues and methodological approaches relevant for the study of historical problems

- Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history

- A sound grounding for further research, either in a doctoral programme or in a professional environment

- A near proficient ability in the a language.

Knowledge:
1. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.

2. How to formulate and carry out a research project, based on a thorough knowledge and understanding of the particular field of study chosen by the student, the relevant literature and current debates.
3. Language skills appropriate to chosen region of study.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and reassess evidence for themselves.

3. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches.

4. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general.

Subject-based practical skills:
1. Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation.

2. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions.

3. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects.

4. Effective use of relevant professional databases.

5. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
1. Critical thinking.

2. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

3. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources.

4. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The Legal Practice Course (LPC) aims to prepare you for employment as a trainee solicitor and to provide you with a solid foundation for subsequent practice as a solicitor. Read more
The Legal Practice Course (LPC) aims to prepare you for employment as a trainee solicitor and to provide you with a solid foundation for subsequent practice as a solicitor. This course can be studied full-time or part-time (day or evening). In the most recent (2014-15) Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey, 98.2% of graduates from this course were in work or further study within six months.

More about this course

This course provides graduates who have completed the academic stage of legal training with the professional stage of training required to qualify as a solicitor. We have a long-standing reputation for training solicitors and were one of the first universities to be validated to run the Legal Practice Course.

The course emulates the nature of the work encountered in practice and is transactional, following clients through various legal transactions and court hearings. It builds on the substantive law that you will have already learnt and includes the study of both law, and procedure in the major areas of practice. It also teaches the 'lawyerly' skills of practical legal research, interviewing and advising, writing, drafting and advocacy to prepare you for your subsequent professional training and for practice as a solicitor.

The LPC is entirely taught in a modern building with a mock court room, audio visual recording facilities, IT resources and library. Materials and case studies are provided.
-The LPC at London Met provides you with the required knowledge and skills that you will need to qualify as a solicitor.
-We offer work placements and pro bono opportunities to enhance your employment prospects.
-It is the most competitively priced LPC provided by a London university with flexible study options to suit you.
-All teaching is undertaken by qualified lawyers with extensive practice experience and students benefit from personal feedback.
-There is an option to top up the LPC on completion of the course to an LLM in Legal Practice by completion of dissertation.


Teaching is highly interactive and you will be taught in a small groups in three-hour sessions. The tutors are accessible and friendly and classes are supplemented with online tests and revision lectures and materials. The emphasis is on face to face teaching although some lectures, covering more complex subjects, are available online,. The overwhelming response from student feedback is that they prefer live contact with tutors and fellow students. You learn by “doing” on this LPC.

Students attending on either the one year full-time or the two year part-time LPC are required to attend an intensive foundation course for the first week of term in September from Monday to Friday, 10am until 5pm. Compulsory attendance is required for all students, irrespective of whether you are studying full-time or part-time. Please take this into consideration when arranging work, family and holiday commitments.

You can choose to have all your face-to-face tuition and workshops for the core practice areas concentrated into two set days a week on our one year course. This is usually Tuesday and Thursday from September until June. It enables you to reduce your travelling costs and plan your week. You attend an average of 12 hours face to face contact per week with the remaining time devoted to private study. Please note however, you may have to come into the university on additional days for assessments. Also Stage 2 elective subjects may run on different days.

Students who wish to complete the Legal Practice Course over two years can attend either in the evenings or during the day. The part time evening classes are taught from 6pm until 9pm on Tuesday and Thursday in the first year and Monday and Wednesday in the second year. The part-time day classes are taught from 10am until 5pm on Friday in the first year and on Monday in the second year.

Assessment methods are designed to reflect how solicitors work today, and include skills assessments and open book examinations.

Professional accreditation

London Metropolitan University is an SRA (Solicitor Regulation Authority) approved LPC provider.

Modular structure

The modules listed below are for the academic year 2016/17 and represent the course modules at this time. Modules and module details (including, but not limited to, location and time) are subject to change over time.

Year 1 modules include:
-Advocacy Skills (core, 0 credits)
-Business Law and Practice (core, 24 credits)
-Drafting Skills (core, 2.25 credits)
-Interviewing Skills (core, 5.5 credits)
-Legal Writing Skills (core, 2.25 credits)
-Litigation (core, 39.5 credits)
-Professional Conduct and Regulation (core, 1.5 credits)
-Property Law and Practice (core, 24 credits)
-Research Skills (core, 2.75 credits)
-Solicitors Accounts (core, 6 credits)
-Wills and Administration of Estates (core, 2 credits)
-Advanced Business Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Child Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Civil and Commercial Mediation and Alternative Dispute Resolution (option, 13.5 credits)
-Commercial Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Corporate Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Employment Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Family Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Housing Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Immigration Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Intellectual Property Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)
-Private Client Law and Practice (option, 13.5 credits)

After the course

Helping LPC students to get a training contract and legal work experience is central to what we do. Each student is designated a professional mentor to provide individual advice and guidance. We offer a number of work placements within solicitor’s firms, at court or within not-for-profit organisations to enhance your CV, provide contacts and networking opportunities. We also offer pro bono work for students who need to enhance their links with the solicitors’ profession. In March each year we run a career development week to help focus on your career prospects. We offer mock interviews, CV surgeries and networking workshops. Our excellent careers service can also help you in obtaining training contracts and valuable work experience.

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Keele University is one of the first Higher Education Institutions to offer counsellor training in the UK and has been delivering high quality training programmes since the early 1970s. Read more

Overview

Keele University is one of the first Higher Education Institutions to offer counsellor training in the UK and has been delivering high quality training programmes since the early 1970s.

The BACP accredited Professional Counselling Training Route/part-time MSc in Counselling Psychology is a part-time vocational training programme which builds up over three years. In Year One students complete the Certificate in Counselling and in Year Two the Postgraduate Diploma in Counselling. In Year Three students undertake the MSc research studies year. Successful completion of each academic year enables either progression onto the next year or an opportunity to exit with the completed qualification.

The first two years of the part-time MSc Counselling Psychology (The Professional Counselling Training Route) are accredited by the British Association of Counsellors and Psychotherapy (BACP) as a route of professional counsellor training. Candidates for accreditation will also have to meet all other criteria in line with BACP accreditation procedures.

- Training Philosophy
This part-time professional counselling training route is founded on a person-centred view of personhood and person-centred ways of being. In this we view the relationship in counselling as central, and support Rogers’ belief in the ‘self-therapeutic capacity and wisdom of clients’. However, we also take a strong ‘anti-schoolism’ stance which reflects our sincere respect for other, non-person-centred practices and practitioners. Our starting point for the Keele Counselling Model is thus a unifying ethos which enables us to respect and welcome a diversity of professional skills and orientations.

Course Aims

The programme as a whole aims to equip students with the knowledge and expertise to support their work as professional person centred/ humanistic counsellors. It aims to integrate students’ counselling skills practice with academic study at each training level and to facilitate student learning in the areas of psychology: counselling skills, counselling related theory and self-development. The principles underpinning the programme are empowerment, holistic development, relationships and community.

- Year One: The Certificate in Counselling
This programme is an introduction to person-centred counselling theory and practice. It is suitable for individuals from a range of professional backgrounds who wish to improve their communication skills or begin training as a professional counsellor. The Certificate is an entry route onto the Postgraduate Diploma in Counselling Psychology for those without traditional academic qualifications. On completion of the Certificate in Counselling students should have gained competencies in a wide range of professional knowledge, skills and self-development relevant to counselling practice.

- Year Two: Postgraduate Diploma in Counselling Psychology
This year follows on from the Certificate in Counselling and offers professional training in counselling practice, theory and self-development. It is based on a person centred/humanistic philosophy with person-centred practice. Students are expected to undertake one hundred hours of supervised counselling practice placement. Applicants must have successfully completed the Certificate in Counselling at Keele University to access training in Year Two.

It is expected that students will progress to Year 2 in September of the year in which they complete the Certificate and, as long as they meet the requirements for progression, they are guaranteed a place on the Year 2 course starting in that September. Students may defer the commencement of Year 2 but, in this case, they would have to apply for a place and cannot be guaranteed a place in the academic year in which they wish to resume their studies.

Years 1 and 2 of the programme together constitute a BACP accredited training course. However, any other exit awards, e.g. completion of the Certificate in Counselling alone, or a Post Graduate Diploma in Counselling Psychology Studies, which would not include the 100 hours of supervised counselling practice on placement, would not constitute a BACP accredited training course.

- Year Three: MSc Counselling Psychology
Year three of the part-time MSc Counselling Psychology places a particular emphasis on developing the counselling practitioner’s own research interests, including a research based dissertation.

Teaching

We employ a wide variety of teaching and learning strategies including lectures, large group work, community meetings, tutorials and small group work. Students are encouraged to engage in experiential as well as academic learning methods.

Assessment

With the exception of a multiple-choice questionnaire classroom test in Year 2, all modules are assessed on the basis of coursework. The pass mark for all modules in Year 1 (Level 6) is 50% and, in Year 2 (Level 7), is 40%.

Additional Costs

In year 1 students have to attend a minimum of 8 hours of personal therapy and in year 2 a minimum of 20 hours of personal therapy (Subject to approval by Senate) to complete the course and payment for this is the responsibility of the students. As a guide, costs for this on average are £35 - £45 per hour.

When completing the 100 hour placement requirement in Year 2, students also have to undertake a minimum of 14 hours of supervision for which there may also be a charge. Again, as a guide, costs for this are on average £35 - £45 per hour.
Parking is also an additional cost for students who wish to use their cars on campus. Details of student parking permits are sent out with the pre-enrolment information.

Students should also be aware that possible additional costs may be incurred when attending the compulsory non-residential Conference weekend. Refreshments and lunches are provided for the students free of charge during the weekend but there will be an additional cost should students wish to attend the Saturday evening Conference dinner and also if wishing to book local accommodation.

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This two-year taught Masters provides you with an opportunity to study a portfolio of courses in the first year, designed to bring you up to the entry standard for the Master's degree; ideal if you have graduated from disciplines other than Economics, or if you have some background in Economics and wish to deepen your understanding of the discipline. Read more
This two-year taught Masters provides you with an opportunity to study a portfolio of courses in the first year, designed to bring you up to the entry standard for the Master's degree; ideal if you have graduated from disciplines other than Economics, or if you have some background in Economics and wish to deepen your understanding of the discipline.

Subject to performance pre-requisites, at the end of the first year you will progress to the 1-year MSc in Economics, or on to other related MSc programmes of your choice.

The course will provide you with rigorous training in the analysis of economics, including quantitative techniques and research methods. On completion of this degree you will be equipped with the tools of the professional economist and ready for your chosen career path, whether in government, the private and financial services sectors or further research in Economics.

In the first year you will study undergraduate level courses in three core areas: Microeconomics, Macroeconomics and Quantitative Methods. You will also select either one or two (depending on their credit value) optional courses from a wide range on offer. In the second year, subject to progression, you will study at Masters level.

You will be taught by a top-ranking Department of Economics with expertise in a wide set of areas and who produce world leading research.

With an intake of only 10 places you will benefit from a strong sense of group identity and enjoy close contact with the academic staff of the Department. The course director serves as your personal advisor up until the spring of the second year, where you will then be assigned a personal dissertation supervisor.

See the website https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/economics/coursefinder/msceconomics2yearprogramme.aspx

Why choose this course?

- The course is ideal if you have graduated from a discipline other than Economics or wish to deepen your understanding of the discipline.

- The course offers an excellent opportunity to get a strong grounding in core areas of Economics and to specialise your knowledge further through the wide range of optional courses on offer.

- You will be taught by academics who produce world leading research. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise we were ranked among the top 10 Economics Departments in the UK.

- Our graduates are highly employable; 90% of graduates from the Department of Economics were in full-time employment or further study within 6 months of graduation.

- Our courses are small and select, the 2-year course is limited to 10 students, thus ensuring that you will receive individual attention from the academic staff.

- The Department has expertise in a wide set of areas, including Labour Economics, Experimental Economics, and Public Economics, and the topics taught on our Masters courses reflect these areas of excellence.

- We are one of the few Departments in the UK to have an in-house economics experiments laboratory, used by staff and research students.

Department research and industry highlights

- Economics is among the top departments in the UK for Research Excellence. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), 80% of the Department's research submitted was ranked as world-leading or internationally excellent (rated 3* and 4*).

- A recent analysis of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) shows that the Economics Department at Royal Holloway is the third best department in the UK for publications. The study by Jim Taylor and Ian Walker provides further insight into the research standing of UK economics departments. Previous rankings from the data already showed the Department in the top 10 in the UK.

- The Department produces top research across the main fields of the discipline and has particular strength in applied work.

- We run a weekly Internal Seminar which provides a lively forum for work at an early stage of development. Our External Seminar Series runs weekly during term and welcomed over 20 external speakers from prominent places during last academic year. Invitees are the usual mixture of established names and newer entrants to the profession thought to be doing exciting work.

Course content and structure

The duration of the course is 2 years. In year one you will study for 9 months (September to May) and start year two in in the following September. Year two begins with a compulsory two week mathematics refresher course prior to lectures and seminars starting. The dissertation is written over the summer.

On completion of the course graduates will have:
- advanced training in the principles of economics and their application appropriate to postgraduate level

- developed the ability to apply the advanced knowledge, research methods and skills they have acquired to the solution of theoretical and/or applied problems in economic policy

- the ability to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the discipline

- analytical skills and an ability to develop simplifying frameworks for studying the real world and to be able to appreciate what would be an appropriate level of abstraction for a range of economic issues

- a range of transferable skills that will be of value in employment and self-employment

- the knowledge and skills base from which they can proceed to research in economics and related areas.

Assessment

Assessment is carried out by a variety of methods including coursework, examinations and a dissertation.

Employability & career opportunities

90% of graduates from the Economics Department at Royal Holloway University were in full time employment or further study within six months of graduation.

Our graduates are highly employable and, in recent years, have entered many different Economic-related areas, including working in the Public Sector (Government Economic Service), journalism, and business analysis. Our graduates are currently working for firms such as Accenture, Barclays, TNS, Bloomberg, Citigroup, Royal Bank of Scotland, Credit Suisse, Pricewaterhouse Cooper and Baker and Mackenzie. This course also equips you with the subject knowledge and a solid foundation for continued PhD studies.

You career ambitions are supported by our Careers Executive, Dr. Melanie Luhrmann as well as the College Careers Service, located right next door to the economics department. They offer application and interview coaching, career strategy discussions, and the opportunity to network with major employers on campus. Our careers service is provided by the Careers Group, the main provider of graduate recruitment services in London. Thus you will have additional access to a wealth of presentations and networking opportunities.

How to apply

Applications for entry to all our full-time postgraduate degrees can be made online https://www.royalholloway.ac.uk/studyhere/postgraduate/applying/howtoapply.aspx .

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Postgraduate Diploma in Pain Management. Our online 1 year Postgraduate Diploma in Pain Management covers the wide range of the conditions pertinent to pain management and meets the educational needs of both primary and secondary healthcare professionals. Read more

Postgraduate Diploma in Pain Management

Our online 1 year Postgraduate Diploma in Pain Management covers the wide range of the conditions pertinent to pain management and meets the educational needs of both primary and secondary healthcare professionals. The course is worth 120 credits and comprises 6 modules of 20 credits each.

Our Diploma in Pain Management has been developed for Doctors, Nurses, Allied Health Professionals, Practice Nurses and those with related undergraduate degrees (Clinical Nurse specialists, Physiotherapists, Chiropractors, Osteopaths, Dentists, Psychology, Occupational Therapists, Podiatrists, Rehabilitation specialists) or equivalent professional qualifications and background experience. Having a specialist knowledge in Pain Management is an increasingly important asset and extra responsibility of medical personnel.

On completion of the course, you will be able to:

- demonstrate a systematic understanding of the care of patients in Pain Management.

- critically evaluate current research in inter-disciplinary & multi-disciplinary Pain Management

- demonstrate a critical understanding of self-care promotion for acute and chronic pain

- deliver management strategies for the investigation and treatment of patients with pain conditions.

Course Structure

The online course lasts one calendar year and is a part-time distance learning course. It consists of 6 modules per year, each of 6 weeks duration.

Module 1 - Mechanisms of pain

Module 2 - Types of pain

Module 3 - Principles of pain assessment and management

Module 4 - Multi-disciplinary approaches to pain management

Module 5 - Pain in specified populations

Module 6 - Inter disciplinary Service Provision

Assessment

Online Diploma in Health Economics

The course puts assessment at the heart of learning by using clinical scenarios to facilitate problem-solving, critical analysis and evidence-based care. The scenarios act as both the focus for learning and assessment thus embedding assessment within the learning process.

Each of the 6 modules has the same assessment format. Due to the online nature of the course, students are expected to login and participate in the course regularly throughout the module (ideally on a daily basis).

Students are split into groups of 10-15 students and are assigned a dedicated expert tutor who:

Facilitates clinical case discussions with the group.

Monitors, assesses and marks each student throughout the module.

Students use the skills gained during the lectures to engage with the different activities (see below).

Clinical case scenarios with case based discussion - 40%

Individual learning portfolio - 10%

Group/individual activity - 20%

Case based examination - 30%

MSc Pain Management course

The MSc Pain Management course aims to create professionals who can independently access information and use the information to critically assess, evaluate and disseminate the evidence base related to Pain Management. The course will enable more health care professionals to have the required knowledge to treat patients. It will develop problem-solving and clinical skills together with preparing students to take a leadership role in Pain Management.

Entry to the 1 year Msc in Pain Management will require the successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma in Pain Management (120 credits) either from the University of South Wales or from another UK University.

Our Pain Management Masters of Science course has been developed for health professionals who are interested in a leadership role within Pain Management including Doctors, Nurses, Allied Health Professionals, Practice Nurses and those with equivalent professional qualifications and background experience.

The MSc Pain Management course is the only one of its title that is accessible online, and is not offered by any other institution. On completion of the course, you will be able to:

Extend the knowledge of research methods and application to practice at MSc level.

Demonstrate an ability to use knowledge to adapt professional practice to meet the changing demands of health care systems.

Course Structure

The online course lasts one calendar year and is a part-time distance learning course. It consists of 6 modules per year, each of 6 weeks duration.

Module 1 - Research Methodologies and Critical Appraisal: Pain Management

Module 2 - Professional Project: Pain Management or Independent Prescribing Module

Teaching Methods

Module 1 - Research Methodologies and Critical Appraisal

MSc teaching methods for this module are similar to the PG Diploma course modules however it is run over 12 weeks.

Module 2 - Professional Project

To produce the professional project, students continue to use the online course however much of the work is self-directed.

Students are expected in the first 8 weeks to interact with their tutor on a weekly basis. Students select a specific project and submit a project summary/proposal (approximately 1500 words).



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