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Master in BIG DATA. Read more
Master in BIG DATA : Data Analytics, Data Science, Data Architecture”, accredited by the French Ministry of Higher Education and Research, draws on the recognized excellence of our engineering school in business intelligence and has grown from the specializations in Decision Support, Business Intelligence and Business Analytics. The Master is primarily going to appeal to international students, "free movers" or those from our partner universities or for high-potential foreign engineers who are looking for an international career in the domain of Business Analytics.

This program leads to a Master degree and a Diplôma accredited by the French Ministry of Higher Education and research.

Objectives

Business Intelligence and now Business Analytics have become key elements of all companies.

The objective of this Master is to train specialists in information systems and decision support, holding a large range of mathematic- and computer-based tools which would allow them to deal with real problems, analyzing their complexity and bringing efficient algorithmic and architectural solutions. Big Data is going to be the Next Big Thing over the coming 10 years.

The targeted applications concern optimization in the processing of large amounts of data (known as Big Data), logistics, industrial automation, but above all it’s the development of BI systems architecture. These applications have a role in most business domains: logistics, production, finance, marketing, client relation management.

The need for trained engineering specialists in these domains is growing constantly: recent studies show a large demand of training in these areas.

Distinctive points of this course

• The triple skill-set with architecture (BI), data mining and business resource optimization.
• This master will be run by a multidisciplinary group: statistics, data mining, operational research, architecture.
• The undertaking of interdisciplinary projects.
• The methods and techniques taught in this program come from cutting-edge domains in industry and research, such as: opinion mining, social networks and big data, optimization, resource allocation and BI systems architecture.
• The Master is closely backed up by research: several students are completing their end-of-studies project on themes from the [email protected] laboratory, followed and supported by members from the laboratory (PhD students and researcher teachers).
• The training on the tools used in industry dedicated to data mining, operational research and Business Intelligence gives the students a plus in their employability after completion.
• Industrial partnerships with companies very involved in Big Data have been developed:
• SAS via the academic program and a ‘chaire d’entreprise’ (business chair), allowing our students access to Business Intelligence modules such as Enterprise Miner (data mining) and SAS-OR (in operational research).

Practical information

The Master’s degree counts for 120 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) in total and lasts two years. The training lasts 1252 hours (611 hours in M1 and 641 hours in M2). The semesters are divided as follows:
• M1 courses take place from September until June and count for a total of 60 ECTS
• M2 courses take place from September until mid-April and count for a total of 42ECTS
• A five-month internship (in France) from mid- April until mid- September for 9 ECTS is required and a Master thesis for 9 ECTS.

Non-French speakers will be asked to participate to a one week intensive French course that precedes the start of the program and allows students to gain the linguistic knowledge necessary for daily interactions.

[[Organization ]]
M1 modules are taught from September to June (60 ECTS, 611 h)
• Data exploration
• Inferential Statistics (3 ECTS, 30h, 1 S*)
• Data Analysis (2 ECTS, 2h, 1 S)
• Mathematics for Computer science
• Partial Differential Equations and Finite Differences (3 ECTS, 30h, 1 S)
• Operational Research: Linear Optimization (2 ECTS, 20h, 1 S)
• Combinatory Optimization (2 ECTS, 18h, 1 S)
• Complexity theory (1 ECTS, 9h, 1 S)
• Simulation and Stochastic Process (3 ECTS, 30h, 2 S**)
• Introduction to Predictive Modelling (2ECTS, 21h, 2 S)
• Deterministic and Stochastic Optimization (3 ECTS, 30h, 2 S)
• Introduction to Data Mining (2 ECTS, 21h, 2 S)
• Software and Architecture
• Object-Oriented Modelling (OOM) with UML (3 ECTS, 30h, 1 S)
• Object-Oriented Design and Programming with Java (2 ECTS, 30h, 1 S)
• Relational Database: Modelling and Design (3ECTS, 30h, 1 S)
• PLSQL (2 ECTS, 21h, 2 S)
• Architecture and Network Programming (3 ECTS, 30h, 2 S)
• Parallel Programming (3 ECTS, 30h, 2 S)
• Engineering Science
• Signal and System (3 ECTS, 21 h, 1 S)
• Signal processing (3 ECTS, 30h, 1 S)

• Research Initiation
• Scientific Paper review (1 ECTS, 9h, 1 S)
• Final research project on BIG DATA (5 ECTS, 50h, 2 S)
• Project Management
• AGIL Methods & Transverse Project (2 ECTS, 21h, 2 S)
• Languages and workshops
• French and Foreign languages (6 ECTS, 61h, 1&2 S)
• Personal and Professional Project (1 ECTS, 15, 1 S)
*1 S= 1st semester, ** 2 S= 2nd semester

M2 Program: from September to September (60 ECTS, 641h)
M2 level is a collection of modules, giving in total 60 ECTS (42 ECTS for the modules taught from September to April, plus 9 ECTS for the internship and 9 ECTS for the Master thesis).

Computer technologies
• Web Services (3 ECTS, 24h, 1 S)
• NOSQL (2 ECTS, 20h, 1 S)
• Java EE (3 ECTS, 24, 1S)
Data exploration
• Semantic web and Ontology (2 ECTS, 20h, 1 S)
• Data mining: application (2 ECTS, 20h, 1S)
• Social Network Analysis (2ECTS, 18h, 1S)
• Collective intelligence: Web Mining and Multimedia indexation (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
• Enterprise Miner SAS (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
• Text Mining and natural language (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
Operations Research
• Thorough operational research: modelling and business application (2 ECTS, 21h, 1 S)
• Game theory (1 ECTS, 10h, 1 S)
• Forecasting models (2 ECTS, 20h, 1 S)
• Constraint programming (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
• Multi-objective and multi-criteria optimisation (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
• SAS OR (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
Research Initiation Initiative
• Scientific Paper review (1 ECTS, 10h, 1 S)
• Final research project on BIG DATA (2 ECTS, 39, 2 S)
BI Architecture
• BI Theory (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
• BI Practice (2 ECTS, 20h, 2 S)
Languages and workshops (4 ECTS, 105h, 1&2 S)
• French as a Foreign language
• CV workshop
• Personal and Professional Project
Internship
• Internship (9 ECTS, 22 weeks minimum)
Thesis
• Master thesis (9 ECTS, 150h)

Teaching

Fourteen external teachers (lecturers from universities, teacher-researchers, professors etc.), supported by a piloting committee, will bring together the training given in Cergy.

All the classes will be taught in English, with the exception of:
• The class of FLE (French as a foreign language), where the objective is to teach the students how to understand and express themselves in French.
• Cultural Openness, where the objective is to enrich the students’ knowledge of French culture.
The EISTI offers an e-learning site to all its students, which complements everything the students will learn through their presence and participation in class:
• class documents, practical work and tutorials online
• questions and discussions between teachers and students, and among students
• a possibility of handing work in online

All Master’s students are equipped with a laptop for the duration of the program that remains the property of the EISTI.

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules.

A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject. Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawdevgov/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or for years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Development and Governance specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAC177 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law- 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
- Water Law and Development: Conflicts, Governance and Justice - 15PLAD177 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law. A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity. Read more
The SOAS LLM degree is a postgraduate qualification for those who hold an undergraduate degree in law.

A specialist LLM in International Economic Law will be of interest to those who wish to focus on legal aspects of international economic activity.

Students following the SOAS International Economic Law LLM are immersed in one of the youngest and most dynamic fields of international legal theory and practice.

The questions they confront are difficult, urgent and compelling:
- When we regulate international trade, do we sometimes do more harm than good?
- What impact do bureaucracy and corruption have on foreign investment levels?
- What might international institutions do to prevent a future global economic crisis?
- What changes are China and India bringing to international economic law?
- What is the impact of economic liberalization on labour law and social welfare ?

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llminteconlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three of fours years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Economic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a course offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the course will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each course may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintcompcomlaw/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International and Comparative Commercial Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Banking Law - 15PLAC105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAC106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAC175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAC116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAC120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAC135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
EU Law in Global Context - 15PLAH051 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

Banking Law - 15PLAD105 (1 Unit)
Chinese Commercial Law - 15PLAD106 (1 Unit)
Comparative Commercial Law - 15PLAD175 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
International and Comparative Corporate Law - 15PLAD116 (1 Unit)
International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Trade Law - 15PLAD120 (1 Unit)
Law of International Finance - 15PLAD135 (1 Unit)
Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmintlaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the International Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAC154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAC153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAC118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAC126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAC140 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Colonialism, Empire and International Law - 15PLAH025 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Corporate Law - 15PLAH059 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
- International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
- Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
- The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Climate Change Law and Policy - 15PLAD154 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
- International Commercial and Investment Arbitration - 15PLAD153 (1 Unit)
- International Environmental Law - 15PLAD118 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD167 (1 Unit)
- International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
- Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
- Law and Natural Resources - 15PLAD126 (1 Unit)
- Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)
- Multinational Enterprises and the Law - 15PLAD140 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Admission to this program is a competitive process, with candidates (students) admitted in cohorts. Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/elpts/edle/ma/. Read more
Admission to this program is a competitive process, with candidates (students) admitted in cohorts.

Visit the website http://education.ua.edu/academics/elpts/edle/ma/

Application Process

Visit the UA Graduate School website where you will:

- Complete the online application http://graduate.ua.edu/application.

- Submit official GRE or MAT scores.

- Submit official transcripts from all previous post-secondary institutions attended.

- Submit a statement of purpose.

- Submit 3 letters of recommendation (one from your principal or supervisor).

Due Date for Applications

Applications for admission will be due in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy & Technology Studies by April 1 for entry into a cohort that will begin the program in the subsequent summer. All applications for entry into a cohort that will begin in the spring are due November 1, and all applications for entry into a cohort that will begin the subsequent fall will be due in the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy & Technology Studies by July 1. All applicants for this program must provide a Supplemental EXP completed by their current and/or previous school system(s) verifying at least three full years of full-time, acceptable professional educational experience including at least one full year of full–time P-12 teaching experience. The original notarized form(s) should be sent to:

Dawn Bryant
Student Services & Certification
College of Education
The University of Alabama
Box 870321
Tuscaloosa, Al, 35487-0231

Portfolio

In addition to the general application materials required by the University of Alabama Graduate School and the Department of Educational Leadership, Policy & Technology Studies, applicants must construct an application portfolio, as required by Ala. Admin. Code §290-3-3-.48(1)(b). For entry into a cohort beginning in the Summer Term, the application portfolio is due in the Department by April 1. For entry into a cohort beginning in the Spring Term, the application portfolio is due in the Department by November 1. For entry into a cohort beginning in the Fall Term, the application portfolio is due in the Department by July 1.

The application portfolio must contain the following items:

- Three letters of recommendation, including one from the applicant’s principal or supervisor;

- Completed copy (all forms) of most recent performance appraisal to include the professional development component if available;

- Evidence of ability to improve student achievement;

- Evidence of leadership and management potential including evidence of most recent accomplishments in the area of educational leadership;

- Summary statement of applicant’s reasons for pursuing instructional leadership certification;

- Summary statement of what the applicant expects from the program; and,

- The applicant’s vitae.

Items should be placed in a large envelope in the order of the above list, have divider pages between items, and mailed to Vanessa Williams, The University of Alabama, Box 870302, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487-0302 or hand-delivered to 301 Graves Hall (main campus) or to the UA Gadsden Center.

Assessment Center

The purpose of the Assessment Center is to first fulfill the regulatory requirement of a face-to-face interview with each applicant. The Assessment Center will also include other activities designed to provide additional information, particularly with respect to candidate dispositions and candidate writing skills, to adequately assess candidate aptitude for instructional leadership.

Scheduled Assessment Centers appear below. Candidates electing to participate in an Assessment Center at the Gadsden Center should contact Dr. Brenda Mendiola ().

Cohort Numbers

Cohorts will be limited to twenty-five participants at two locations: Tuscaloosa (main campus) and at the UA Gadsden Center. Additional cohorts will be admitted at either location, if there are sufficient eligible candidates and available faculty members.

Program of Study

The program of study for the Master of Arts Degree in Educational Leadership, leading to initial certification in Alabama for Instructional Leadership, will be composed of thirty (30) semester hours of coursework, including the following courses:

AEL 520: Leadership for Communities and Stakeholders (3 semester hours)
AEL 521: Leadership for Continuous Improvement (3 semester hours)
AEL 522: Leadership for Teaching and Learning (3 semester hours)
AEL 523: Human Resource Development (3 semester hours)
AEL 524: Ethics and Law (3 semester hours)
AEL 525: Management of Learning Organizations (3 semester hours)
AEL 526: Data-Informed Decision-Making (3 semester hours)
AEL 527: Internship in Instructional Leadership (3 semester hours)
BER 540: Quantitative Research; Statistics (3 semester hours)
BEF graduate-level Foundations Course from approved list (3 semester hours)
Total: 30 semester hours for Masters Degree in Educational Leadership

*Note: To receive certification at the “A” level, students are also required to have taken a special education survey course (SPE 300 or SPE 500 or the equivalent). If students have taken a special education survey course as part of the requirements for an earlier certificate, it will not have to be taken again. If students have not taken a special education survey course for an earlier certificate, SPE 500 must be taken in addition to the 30 semester hours detailed above.

Field experience objectives, including progression from observation through participation to leading behaviors, will be embedded in each course and assessed by the faculty member of record for each course. Throughout this program, instructional activities are aligned with instructional objectives. The faculty member of record has the responsibility of assigning the LiveText assessment (1, 2, 3, 4) for each objective, and instructional activities will also generate documentation for the electronic portfolio aspect of LiveText, which will append to the assessment ratings.

Find out how to apply here - http://graduate.ua.edu/prospects/application/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission by during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed. It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law.

It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmlawcultsoc/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Law, Culture and Society specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAC155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAC115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAC134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAC139 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Chinese Constitutionalism - 15PLAH043 (0.5 Unit)
- Comparative Constitutional Law - 15PLAH046 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Unit)
- Law & Critique - 15PLAH053 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Postcolonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
- Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
- Migration, Gender and the Law in South East Asia and Beyond - 15PLAH023 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
- Childhood, Politics and Law - 15PPOH037 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below. You will need to attend the teaching on the module and then submit a dissertation in place of the module method of assessment.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Feminist Legal Theory - 15PLAD155 (1 Unit)
- International and Comparative Copyright Law: Copyright in the global village - 15PLAD115 (1 Unit)
- International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit)
- Law and in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)
- Law, Institutions and Political Economy of Transition - 15PLAD134 (1 Unit)
- Modern Chinese Law and Institutions - 15PLAD139 (1 Unit)

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

Read less
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. the assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision.

With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmhrconfjust/

Duration: One calendar year (full-time)
Two, three or four years (part-time, daytime only)
We recommend that part-time students have between two-and-a-half and three days a week free to pursue their course of study.

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Human Rights, Conflict and Justice specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAC111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAC112 (1 Unit)
International Human Rights Clinic - 15PLAC145 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAC169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAC119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAC123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAC131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAC133 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Units)
Foundations of International Law - 15PLAH021 (0.5 Units)
International Criminal Law - 15PLAH055 (0.5 Unit)
International Refugee and Migration Law - 15PLAH057 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Human Rights in China - 15PLAH054 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Policy of International Courts and Tribunals - 15PLAH026 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Post-Colonial Theory - 15PLAH050 (0.5 Unit)
Law and Society in Southeast Asia - 15PLAH049 (0.5 Unit)
Law, Rights and Society in Taiwan - 15PLAH058 (0.5 Unit)
The Law of Armed Conflict - 15PLAH022 (0.5 Unit)

Examples of non-Law module options:
Gender, Armed Conflict and International Law - 15PGNH005 (0.5 Units)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
Human Rights in the Developing World - 15PLAD111 (1 Unit)
Human Rights of Women - 15PLAD112 (1 Unit)
International Labour Law and Equality Rights - 15PLAD169 (1 Unit)
International Protection of Human Rights - 15PLAD119 (1 Unit)
Justice, Reconciliation and Reconstruction in Post Conflict Societies - 15PLAD123 (1 Unit)
Law and International Inequality: Critical legal analysis of political economy from colonialism to globalisation - 15PLAD131 (1 Unit)
Law, Human Rights and Peace-building: the Israeli-Palestinian case - 15PLAD133 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The programme is tailored for students who wish to proceed to further research on the doctoral level on a topic related to the history of the Near and Middle East, South Asia, South East Asia, East Asia and Africa, but it also makes sense as a stand-alone programme for those who wish to explore a specific topic or question within a shorter period of time.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course would enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

Career opportunities include:

- Further historical research (PhD)
- Research positions in government institutions, NGOs, journalism, etc.

This is the only Master-level programme in Historical Research Methods focusing on the study of Asia and Africa in the UK. It provides the unique opportunity to develop and carry out a research project under the guidance of regional specialists and thus an ideal preparation for a research degree. It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

Please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme, and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/history/programmes/ma-historial-research-methods-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students take 4 course units over the period of their programme of study (i.e. 2 or 4 years). This includes the core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit), which is taught on a one-to-one basis by the dissertation supervisor, the compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa (1 unit), a minor course or courses (to the value of 1 unit) from a list of approved options and/or a language course from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures, and a 10,000 word dissertation (1 unit).

In the intensive language pathways, students take 2 intensive language units and one history unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take 1 language unit and 2 history units and complete work on their dissertation (1 unit). For example, Year 1: 2 intensive language units + compulsory course Research Methods in History with Special Reference to Asia and Africa; Year 2: 1 intensive language unit + core course Sources and Research Design in Historical Research (1 unit) + minor courses to the value of 1 unit + dissertation.

Aims and Outcomes

- Knowledge of a variety of theoretical issues and methodological approaches relevant for the study of historical problems

- Practical research and writing skills, developed through the study of primary and secondary sources related to Asian and African history

- A sound grounding for further research, either in a doctoral programme or in a professional environment

- A near proficient ability in the a language.

Knowledge:
1. How to locate materials and use research resources (particularly research library catalogues, archival hand lists, and digital resources), assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts, printed, and digital sources, and solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations.

2. How to formulate and carry out a research project, based on a thorough knowledge and understanding of the particular field of study chosen by the student, the relevant literature and current debates.
3. Language skills appropriate to chosen region of study.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:
1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence and understand what the different types of historical sources can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, maintain an open-minded attitude to interpretations that challenge older interpretations, and reassess evidence for themselves.

3. Students should be able to think critically about the nature of the historical discipline, its methodology, historiography, and openness for interdisciplinary approaches.

4. Students should be able to reflect about the potential of historical research on non-Western societies and civilizations for the advancement of the historical discipline and human civilization in general.

Subject-based practical skills:
1. Effective writing and referencing skills, attention to detail and accuracy in presentation.

2. Effective oral presentation of seminar papers, articulation of ideas, and constructive participation in seminar discussions.

3. Ability to retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources, effective note-taking, record keeping and planning of projects.

4. Effective use of relevant professional databases.

5. In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
1. Critical thinking.

2. Ability to communicate effectively in oral and written forms.

3. Information gathering skills from conventional and electronic sources.

4. Effective time-management, writing to word limits, and meeting deadlines.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Train to become an outstanding Primary teacher at Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 with Liverpool John Moores University. Graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) and Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) for the 3-7 age range. Read more
Train to become an outstanding Primary teacher at Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 with Liverpool John Moores University. Graduate with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) and Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) for the 3-7 age range.

-Prepare for a career as an innovative and creative teacher of 3-7 year olds on a programme delivered in partnership with schools who are committed to ensuring your success
-Enjoy placements in nurseries, reception classes and Key Stage 1 settings
-Study over 10 months full time, with 120 days spent on school placement predominantly within a “Home School”
-Qualify with a Postgraduate Diploma in Education featuring 120 Masters-level credits (ours is one of the few ITT courses to offer this) and ---Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) for the same cost and length of study as a PGCE
-Discover why 94% of our Newly Qualified teachers rate our training as good/very good and employment rates are above the national average
-Go on to complete your MA in your first year of employment and look forward to excellent career development

This is an intensive, full time programme leading to Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) alongside your academic PGDE award. University-based study includes: a full time block of three weeks at the start of the course; one day per week until January; occasional week-long, full time study blocks between January and June and a number of conference days. A minimum of 120 days is spent in schools.
Placements are organised in our Partnership schools in the Greater Merseyside area. For the majority of the training you will gain your teaching experience in a “Home School” with a six week placement in an “alternative” school after Christmas. This innovative model ensures that you feel genuinely part of the staff whilst on school placement and can monitor and gain satisfaction from your impact on your pupils’ progress over time.

You will also be allocated a teacher mentor who will organise and supervise your school-based training. Your mentor will be supported by your LJMU tutor who will visit your school several times to monitor your progress. Additional professional development sessions are organised in school during placements.

Tutorial support is an important part of the LJMU learning process and you will receive a personalised service that will enable you to set targets and achieve your potential. Your personal tutor will support your academic and professional development and will meet with you formally during the year.

You will undertake a significant amount of independent study and preparation to support your course assignments and school-based work and should be prepared to work some evenings and weekends.

University-based training takes place at the IM Marsh campus just four miles from the city centre. Here you will find independent study spaces with IT facilities, a library, access to student welfare and support, a gym and other sports facilities plus a café and shop.

The IM Marsh Library houses the main collections linked to this course and is open from 8am until 11pm during term time. You will also have access to the 24 hour, city centre Aldham Robarts and Avril Robarts libraries.

The University element of the programme is based around six core modules focusing on:

-Professional Practice (a series of school-based investigations of current issues)
-Developing Reflective Professional Practice (enabling you to effectively evaluate your school-based practice)
-Pedagogy in the Early Years (in depth support and practical training in a specialist area, drawing on the latest research and classroom-based innovation)
-Pedagogy in Practice (focusing on the skills required for effective teaching and learning including medium-term planning and assessment)
-Learning Teaching and Assessment (developing your skills in school-based action research so that you can identify what works best for your learners)
-Inclusion (ensuring you are fully prepared to meet the diverse needs of your classes)

Further guidance

The information listed in the section entitled ‘What you will study’ is an overview of the academic content of the programme that will take the form of either core or option modules. Modules are designated as core or option in accordance with professional body requirements and internal Academic Framework review, so may be subject to change. Students will be required to undertake modules that the University designates as core and will have a choice of designated option modules. Additionally, option modules may be offered subject to meeting minimum student numbers.

Academic Framework reviews are conducted by LJMU from time to time to ensure that academic standards continue to be maintained. A review is currently in progress and will be operational for the academic year 2016/2017. Final details of this programme’s designated core and option modules will be made available on LJMU’s website as soon as possible and prior to formal enrolment for the academic year 2016/2017.

Please email if you require further guidance or clarification.

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Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

Students who wish to conduct doctoral-level research in Nepal, or in preparation for professional employment in e.g. a government agency or international NGO.

This is the only Masters-level programme offered anywhere in the world that provides students who intend to proceed to conduct anthropological research (broadly defined) in Nepal with the necessary skills (disciplinary, linguistic, methodological).

What will this programme give the student an opportunity to achieve?

- The ability to read, write, speak and understand Nepali to a level suitable for field research in Nepal
- A grounding in the scholarly literature on Nepali history, society and culture
- Expertise in anthropological theory and practice that will provide a basis for research in a Nepali context

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/

Structure

- Year 1
Students take a 1.0 unit Nepali language course (either Nepali Language 1 or Nepali Language 2); 1.0 unit Culture and Conflict in the Himalaya; 1.0 unit Theoretical Approaches in Social Anthropology (or other anthropology options, chosen in consultation with programme convenor, for students with equivalent anthropology training); 0.5 unit Media Production Skills; and 0.5 units of anthropology options.

- Summer break between years 1 and 2
Two weeks of intensive Nepali language tuition at SOAS after the June exams, followed by two months in Kathmandu, attached to the Nepā School of Social Sciences and Humanities and the Bishwo Bhasa Campus of Tribhuvan University. At the end of the summer students will be required to submit a 5000-word preliminary fieldwork report and research proposal, accompanied by a 500-word abstract written in Nepali.

- Year 2
Students take the following courses: 1.5 unit Nepali for researchers; 1.0 unit Anthropological Research Methods (0.5 units Ethnographic Research Methods in term 1 and 0.5 units in Introduction to Quantitative Methods in Social Research in term 2). They also attend the compulsory weekly MPhil Research Training Seminar in anthropology and write a 15,000 word MA Dissertation.

Language courses will be assessed though a mixture of written papers and oral examinations.

Non-language courses will be assessed on the basis of coursework essays and written papers.

Programme Specification (msword; 668kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-anthropology-research-methods-nepali/file68458.rtf

Teaching & Learning

What methods will be used to achieve the learning outcomes?

Knowledge:
1. How to assess data and evidence critically from manuscripts and digital sources, solve problems of conflicting sources and conflicting interpretations, locate materials, use research sources (particularly research library catalogues) and other relevant traditional sources.

2. The Research Methods course focuses on teaching the various research methods associated with anthropological fieldwork including: participant observation, historical research, qualitative interviewing, quantitative data collection, Rapid Participatory Assessment, how to design questionnaires and, especially, on how to formulate a research question and design a project and consider the ethical issues involved. The Statistics courseworks on how to compile statistics, and how to critically assess statistics.

3. The Research Training course, which is assessed by the Masters dissertation, works on students’ writing skills with an emphasis on thinking of the history of the discipline, writing to schedule, writing to requested word count, how to formulate a research question based on the material gathered, as well as how to do a presentation, how to comment on presentations and how to apply for funding. Term three looks at the strategies for working on the Masters’ dissertation and how to be upgraded at the start of the MPhil year.

4. A good grounding in the sociocultural and political history of and contemporary sociocultural and political issues in Nepal, and familiarity with the scholarly literature on these topics.

5. Proficiency in spoken and written Nepali sufficient for the purposes of anthropological field research: ability to conduct conversations and interviews, and read and synthesise information from Nepali written sources.

Intellectual (thinking) skills

1. Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

2. Students should question interpretations, however authoritative, and reassess evidence for themselves. They should be able to design a research project, set a timetable, understand the principles of fieldwork, and consider questions of ethics.

3. Students should learn to read each others’ work for both its strengths and weaknesses, develop their skills as public speakers, learn how to compose short abstracts of their project (for funding), be able to think critically and yet be open to being critiqued themselves.

Subject-based practical skills

The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

1. Communicate effectively in writing, in both English and (at a less advanced level) Nepali
2. Retrieve, sift and select information from a variety of sources in both English and Nepali.
3. Present seminar papers.
4. Listen to and discuss ideas introduced during seminars.
5. Practice research techniques in a variety of specialized research libraries and institutes.
6. Be prepared to do fieldwork for an anthropology PhD.

Transferable skills

The programme will encourage students to:

1. Write good essays and dissertations.
2. Structure and communicate ideas effectively both orally and in writing.
3. Understand unconventional ideas.
4. Present (non–assessed) material orally.
5. Function as a student and researcher in a radically different environment.
6. Be able to apply for funding to do a PhD.
7. Be prepared to enter an Anthropology PhD programme and to be upgraded from MPhil to PhD in the shortest possible time.

Destinations

Students who study MA Anthropological Research Methods and Nepali develop a wide range of transferable skills such as research, analysis, oral and written communication skills.

The communication skills of anthropologists transfer well to areas such as information and technology, the media and tourism. Other recent SOAS career choices have included commerce and banking, government service, the police and prison service, social services and health service administration. Opportunities for graduates with trained awareness of the socio-cultural norms of minority communities also arise in education, local government, libraries and museums.

For more information about Graduate Destinations from this department, please visit the Careers Service website (http://www.soas.ac.uk/careers/graduate-destinations/).

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Read more
The LLM programme is a single subject law programme that may be taken over a period of one year (full-time), or part-time over a period of two, three or four years. Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four full units. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (which must be from your chosen specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation.

The dissertation must be linked to a module offered at SOAS itself, and attendance on the module will be treated as being part of the process of supervision. With permission of the LLM tutor, students will be entitled to select one complementary subject or the equivalent from comparable Master’s module at SOAS including appropriate language modules. A complementary subject may be chosen in substitution for either a full or a half-subject.

Examinations for all taught modules will be held in May/June of each year and the dissertation will be due for submission during September of the final year of registration. The assessment for each module may vary according to the extent to which the research component of each module is to be stressed.

It is expected that all students will graduate with an LLM in law. It is possible, however, for students wishing to graduate with a ‘specialist’ degree, to do so by way of opting to take three or more modules from the relevant subject groupings below. In each case, the student must undertake a dissertation in that subject grouping.

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/llm/llmislamiclaw/

Structure

Every student will be required to take modules equivalent to four (4.0) full units. Students who wish to graduate with a specialised LLM are required to take at least three (3.0) of the four (4.0) units within their chosen specialism, including the dissertation. The assessment of one of the chosen full units (within the LLM specialism) will be by means of a 15,000 word dissertation. The fourth unit can be chosen from either the general Law Postgraduate Modules or the following modules associated with the Islamic Law specialisation:

Please note: Not all modules listed will be available every year. Please see the individual module page for information.

Full Module Units (1.0):
- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAC176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAC150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAC121 (1 Unit)
- Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAC159 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAC129 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAC130 (1 Unit)

Half Module Units (0.5):
- Foundations of Comparative Law - 15PLAH031 (0.5 Unit)
- Gender, Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAH056 (0.5 Unit)
- Religion & Comparative Constitutionalism - 15PLAH052 (0.5 Unit)

Dissertation (1.0):
The dissertation module unit forms part of the required three (3.0) units within the chosen LLM specialism. Please see the dissertation module units below.

- Critical Jurisprudence in Islamic Law and Society - 15PLAD176 (1 Unit)
- Human Rights and Islamic Law - 15PLAD150 (1 Unit)
- Islamic Law - 15PLAD121 (1 Unit)
- Law of Islamic Finance - 15PLAD159 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in South Asia - 15PLAD129 (1 Unit)
- Law and Society in the Middle East and North Africa - 15PLAD130 (1 Unit)

Faculty of Law and Social Sciences (L&SS)

Welcome to the Faculty of Law and Social Sciences at SOAS. The faculty is the largest in the School in terms of student and staff numbers and consists of the departments of Development Studies, Economics, Financial and Management Studies, Politics and International Studies and the School of Law, as well as the Asia-Pacific Centre for Social Sciences, the Centre for Gender Studies, the Centre for International Studies and Diplomacy, the Centre of Taiwan Studies and a number of department-specific centres. All five departments offer undergraduate programmes, and all but Finance and International Management offer joint undergraduate degrees which can be combined with other disciplines from across the School. Each department also offers a range of masters-level programmes with a regional or disciplinary specialism, as well as a postgraduate research programme. The range of course options and combinations is one of the most distinctive characteristics of studying at SOAS and all students are given the option of studying an Asian or African language, either as part of or on top of their degree.

Staff in the faculty come from all over the world and combine regional knowledge with disciplinary specialisms. Teaching draws heavily on academic staff’s individual research which allows the faculty to maintain a large portfolio of courses, often exploring cutting-edge issues. Many faculty members have played a significant part in public debates and policy-making in relation to Asia and Africa. Academics in the faculty are regularly consulted by governments, public bodies and multilateral organisations including the United Nations and the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, European Commission, DFID and other country-specific organisations and NGOs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Acupuncture is now well known as a system of medicine that involves the insertion of needles to specific points on the body. However, traditional practice also utilises other techniques such as moxibustion and cupping. Read more
Acupuncture is now well known as a system of medicine that involves the insertion of needles to specific points on the body. However, traditional practice also utilises other techniques such as moxibustion and cupping. The Chinese word for acupuncture is zhenjiu; literally needle and moxibustion. It originated In China around three thousand years ago and soon spread to other countries in Asia such as Japan and Korea. Acupuncture is now widely used around the world.

This course provides a strong foundation in the theory and application of acupuncture, as well as extensive clinical experience and a grounding in Chinese language and culture. Over the four year course, you'll also gain a thorough understanding of western bio-medical sciences and the skills to be a reflective and professional practitioner. Research will play an important role in the future development of the profession of acupuncture and this programme is designed to equip you with excellent research skills.

Modules covering Chinese medicine, language and culture will be taught by experienced lecturers from China. You'll benefit from this wealth of clinical experience and extensive knowledge of the various traditions and historical developments in Chinese medicine. You'll also learn from practitioners based in the UK to gain a more complete picture and understanding of the skills required to be a professional acupuncturist in the West.

Clinical experience is central to understanding and good practice of acupuncture. You'll train throughout the course at our teaching clinic. You'll also undertake an extended clinical placement in a Chinese hospital and study at our partner institution the Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine.

All this combined will help you to develop the skills to be a reflective and professional acupuncturist.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/chinese-medicine-acupuncture-masters-m-mac

Modules

Year 1:
- Chinese medicine 1: basic principles
- Concepts of inter-professional practice in health and social care
- Tuina and Jingluo 1
- Clinic 1: observation 1
- Chinese language 1
- Biomedicine 1: anatomy and physiology
- History of Chinese medicine
- Concepts of inter-professional practice in health and social care

Year 2:
- Tuina and Jingluo 2
- Clinic 2: observation 1
- Biomedicine 2: pathophysiology and pharmacology
- Sociology of health
- Chinese language 2
- Chinese medicine 2: pattern differentiation
- Running a practice

Year 3:
- Expertise, evidence and research: Informing clinical practice
- Clinic 3: Patient management 1
- Chinese medicine 3: integration
- Biomedicine 3: diagnosis and treatment
- Research in health and social care

Year 4:
- Clinic 4: Patient management 2

Dissertation:
Option 1: China trip
- Chinese hospital placement
- Chinese language 3
Option 2: Remain in the UK
- Chinese Medicine 4: Plurality and classics
- Chinese language 3

Employability

- Acupuncture as a career
With acupuncture becoming increasingly popular in the UK and western countries, there's a growing amount of opportunities available on graduation – whether you want to be an acupuncturist, or go into teaching, research or another side of healthcare. Our emphasis on a vocational approach to teaching and extensive clinical practice means that when you successfully graduate in Acupuncture you will be able to work as a professional acupuncturist and many recent graduates from this course have gone onto be professional clinical practitioners in acupuncture.

- Role and responsibilities
Acupuncturists spend much of their time working with clients: speaking to them, diagnosing and treating them. Usually working from a clinic, or at a client's home – sometimes on evenings and weekends, acupuncturists tend to be self-employed. This means a good understanding of business and marketing are key skills you would need to develop. A steady hand and empathetic attitude are also important qualities.

- Salary
Incomes vary considerably, however working full-time, acupuncturists may earn between £18,000 and £35,000 a year. (National Careers Service)

- Career progression
This course will enable you to work as a professional acupuncturist, and many recent graduates from this course have gone onto be professional clinical practitioners in acupuncture.

As a graduate from this course, you will be able to apply for further study at postgraduate level.

- LSBU Employability Services
LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

This course is accredited by the British Acupuncture Accreditation Board (BAAB). BAAB accredits courses on behalf of the British Acupuncture Council (BAcC).

This course is run in partnership with London South Bank University, the Confucius Institute at LSBU, Heilongjiang University of Chinese Medicine and Harbin Normal University. All students on the course are eligible to apply for scholarships through the Confucius Institute to undertake studies in Chinese medicine and language in China.

The British Acupuncture Accreditation Board (BAAB) is the Accreditation board for courses in acupuncture.

The BAAB fosters and monitors high quality educational standards to assure the general public that all new graduates from BAAB-accredited acupuncture programmes are knowledgeable, reflective, competent and safe practitioners.

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This popular and highly renowned course has been running for over thirty years. The course offers a rigorous and ethical professional practice course that is designed to be compatible with office working practice. Read more
This popular and highly renowned course has been running for over thirty years. The course offers a rigorous and ethical professional practice course that is designed to be compatible with office working practice.

The Course consists of a series of 18 evening lectures held weekly starting at 6.30 pm on Wednesdays. During the course students are tutored on a one to one basis in the preparation of their 10,000 word Case Study, their 2,000 word Career Evaluation and their PEDR, professional experience record, monitored by the Course Director.

The Part 3 Course is validated by RIBA and prescribed by the Architects Registration Board. Appropriately qualified candidates who pass the Part 3 Examination with two years professional experience are eligible to apply to the Architects Registration Board to register as Architects.

Candidates who do not have a recognised Part 2 in Architecture may wish to do the taught course as a CPD activity and to improve their knowledge of Professional Practice. In this instance they will not be eligible to apply for RIBA Part 3 examination.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/riba-professional-practice-part-3

Modules

The course starts with a eighteen week evening lecture course supplemented with tutorials, case-study seminars and study groups.

This course aims to prepare Architecture students who have RIBA Part 2 with adequate professional experience coming forward to the Part 3 Professional Practice examination. The Professional Practice course covers salient and significant areas of the Professional Practice syllabus as set out by RIBA including; current building legislation, planning, contract law, types of building contract, management of architecture, practice and construction, financial control, business management, professional liability and dispute resolution.

Four weeks before the written examinations there is an examination preparation seminar to guide students for the examination and by "playing the contract game" acquaint them with the workings of a JCT contract.

- Lecture series and exam
- Case study
- Career evaluation and professional interview

Employability

The Professional Practice course is suitable for candidates who wish to prepare for the RIBA Part 3 Examination or for those who wish to gain a greater understanding of professional practice as it relates to Architecture as part of a CPD Programme. Candidates who wish to undertake the course as a CPD activity will not be permitted to sit the Part 3 examination.

The following firms have recently sponsored their staff on this course:
Foster and Partners, EPR, Hamiltons, Hawkins/Brown, Squire and Partners, Allies and Morrison, Broadway Malyan, Sheppard Robson, Terry Farrell, Tangram, Porphyrios Associates, Grimshaw, Fletcher Priest Architects, and The Richard Rogers Partnership.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement from employers who come in to interview and talk to students
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search
- mentoring and work shadowing schemes.

Professional links

- Professional accreditation
Successful completion of the course and passing all parts of the Professional Practice Examination gives exemption from the RIBA Part 3 examination and enables candidates to register with the Architecture Registration Board (ARB) of the UK and also join RIBA as a corporate member. We are also accredited by the Architects Registration Board (ARB).

The members' organisation Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) champions better buildings, communities and the environment through architecture. They provide standards, training, support and recognition that put members around the world at the peak of their profession.

The Architects Registration Board (ARB) is the UK's statutory register of architects, ensuring that graduates from our courses are competent to practice.

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This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. It equips you to teach pupils from 3-7 years and covers all areas of the Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 curriculum, through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. Read more
This programme leads to Qualified Teacher Status. It equips you to teach pupils from 3-7 years and covers all areas of the Early Years Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1 curriculum, through lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. You'll gain 60 Masters level credits and be awarded with a Post-Graduate Certificate of Education.

The programme will give you an in-depth understanding of inclusive practice, equality and diversity to prepare you for a career in London schools. As a part of the programme you will experience different schools and also have an opportunity to work in an Alternative Education Setting. You will follow a specialist Masters level module focused on Early Years Education.

LSBU has a particular focus on social justice and equality that is well matched to the needs of schools in urban and multicultural areas. At LSBU we encourage creativity, reflective pedagogy and sensitivity to educational issues.

See the website http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/courses/course-finder/early-years-pgce

Why specialise in an Early Years PGCE?

The PGCE course qualifies you to teach any age group, but this pathway will allow you to experience the majority of your placements in Early Years Foundation Stage (nursery and reception) and Key Stage 1 (Year 1 or Year 2) and give you opportunities to develop your understanding of pedagogy with an early years focus.

Bursaries

The Government provides the following bursaries to be off-set against tuition fees, via the Training Agency. Tuition fees need to be paid by all students direct to LSBU. Students can use any bursary they receive from the Training Agency for this purpose.

As a primary teacher specialising in the early years, you could be eligible for a training bursary of £3,000 with a first, 2:1, Master’s or PhD.

You do not need to apply for bursaries. Once you have firmly accepted an unconditional offer of a place on a Teacher Training course (and supplied proof of your degree grade) the University will liaise with the Department for Education to put your bursary in place.

Modules

H Level Modules:
- Key Stage 1 core curriculum
This module covers all aspects of the English, mathematics, science and computing national curriculum at Key Stage 1.

- Professional studies
This module covers theories of learning, planning, teaching and assessment, classroom management and employment.

- Foundation subjects
This module covers the national curriculum foundation subjects including: history, geography, art and design, music, and design technology and links this to progression from the early years areas of learning and development.

- School experience
School experience begins in week four of the course. During your Reading Mentor placement you'll be placed in a local school three times a week, gaining experience in the teaching of reading. You'll have opportunities to work with a designated child to develop an in-depth understanding of how teaching relates to pupil learning and progress. Your first block school experience is eight weeks and culminates with you leading a class. School experience 2 is a nine week block, and by the end of this placement you will be expected to teach the whole class for up to three days a week.

- Alternative education setting
In term two you will arrange your own placement following your interests in an Alternative Education Setting. This placement is designed to give you a wider view of education and develop explicit skills that you will then be able to take into mainstream practice. For example you may choose to work in a Special Educational Needs setting or in a Pupil Referral Unit.

M Level Modules:
- Equality, inclusion and citizenship
This module will allow you to reflect on key issues such as equality, diversity and sustainability in the educational context. You'll undertake a small piece of classroom research.

- Early Years Education
This module provides you with the academic background that underpins key educational concepts and learning development theory in the Early Years. The module supports you in developing your understanding of how to plan and manage the curriculum across the Early Years phase and appropriately deploy resources and manage staff and home-school links.

Employability

The success of our PGCE courses has been recognised by Ofsted and we have been identified as a good provider of initial teacher training. Completion and employment rates for our PGCE are both above the sector norms (OFSTED 2014).

All students entering the course have the possibility of gaining up to 60 credits at Masters level, which can be used by students to count towards the award of full Masters qualifications (such as the LSBU MA in Education) gained via further study after graduation.

LSBU Employability Services

LSBU is committed to supporting you develop your employability and succeed in getting a job after you have graduated. Your qualification will certainly help, but in a competitive market you also need to work on your employability, and on your career search. Our Employability Service will support you in developing your skills, finding a job, interview techniques, work experience or an internship, and will help you assess what you need to do to get the job you want at the end of your course. LSBU offers a comprehensive Employability Service, with a range of initiatives to complement your studies, including:

- direct engagement in modules from employers
- Job Shop and on-campus recruitment agencies to help your job search

Professional links

Academics from other institutions and related industries are invited as guest speakers to form part of the Equality Inclusion and Citizenship module. The Alternative Educational Settings placement provides an opportunity for you to experience teaching and learning in a completely different environment, and is one of the unique aspects of our programme. This placement may be related to your choice of Masters Level option module.

Placements

During the course you'll spend 24 weeks on school placements which you'll undertake in at least two schools. There will be a specialised reading placement and a placement in an Alternative Educational Setting, allowing experience of working in the relevant age phases (Foundation Stage and Key Stage 1). Placement schools are chosen to provide different experiences including size, organisation and location.

Our partnership works with a wide range of nurseries and schools across London. Placements are allocated as best fit for each trainee, but if you live in outer London or beyond it may require careful planning by you so that you are able to work at assigned schools.

Teaching and learning

The university based sessions are taught through lectures, workshops, practical sessions, seminars and tutorials. The aim throughout is to encourage creativity, reflective pedagogy and sensitivity to educational issues, aims and objectives. We aim to provide a learning community that actively challenges inequality and injustice.

In particular, the module on Equality, Inclusion and Citizenship will allow you to reflect on key issues such as equality, diversity and sustainability in the educational context.

You will be encouraged to make links between the theoretical and practical elements of the course. We use an interactive model of teaching and learning and you will be encouraged to think critically about subjects to inform your understanding of effective methods of teaching and learning and how best to apply these in classroom situations.

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