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Research training opportunity based on a single project in molecular, environmental or medical microbiology. Note. Financial support/funding for your training may be available - please see below. Read more
Research training opportunity based on a single project in molecular, environmental or medical microbiology.

Note: Financial support/funding for your training may be available - please see below.

For further details please go to http://www.kingston.ac.uk/research/research-degrees/fees/

The project can start at any time. Training duration (full time) - 1 year.

The candidates will be able to select a title from the list below, or suggest their own project relevant to research conducted in the host laboratory. Our priority areas of studies are: molectual mechanisms of interaction between pathogenic bacteria and host cells, virulence factors, mechanisms of bacterial stress response, molecular genetics and genomics with a focus on Campylobacter jejuni and other bacterial pathogens.

Examples of potential research projects:

(1) Investigation of host-pathogen interaction (e.g. to study of adhesins of Campylobacter jejuni and cognate host cell receptors)

(2) Application of IonTorrent Next Generation Sequencing for comparative analysis of bacterial pathogens (e.g. to study genetic mechanisms responsible for structural variation of a capsular polysaccharide of Campylobacter jejuni)

The research will employ a wide range of state of the art microbiological and molecular biology techniques, and a successful candidate will receive extensive training and support from an experienced supervisor.

It is expected that the student will actively participate in scientific meetings and writing research articles with a possibility to progress to a PhD, and a postdoctoral post in future (depending on performance).
Personal requirements:
- enthusiastic and eager to learn;
- keen on research in molecular microbiology in general, and in investigation of bacterial pathogens in particular.
- some basic skills in bench work would be beneficial.

To apply:

Please fill-in the application form available at

http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate/apply-now/documents/ku_postgrad_application_and_reference_form.pdf

Email this along with evidence of educational qualification and any other supporting documents (e.g. University Certificates and exam transcripts, English Language test Certificate if applicatble, etc) to Prof. A. Karlyshev -

Please also ask two referees who are familiar with your academic ability (or any relevant work experience) to email references to Prof. A. Karlyshev -

Financial support

You may be eligible to apply for a studentship/bursary to support your training, and may find useful the following links and contact details:

Funding opportunities listed at Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing
http://sec.kingston.ac.uk/applicants/pg-scholarships/

General info and links
http://www.kingston.ac.uk/international/fees-and-funding/scholarships/

Loyalty bursaries for alumni and families
http://www.kingston.ac.uk/international/fees-and-funding/scholarships/loyalty-bursaries/#alumni

Postgraduate scholarships
http://www.kingston.ac.uk/international/fees-and-funding/scholarships/international-scholarships/postgraduate-scholarships/

Annual Fund scholarships
http://www.kingston.ac.uk/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/funding-your-course/scholarships/annual-fund-scholarship/

Funding/Financial support enquiries:

Postgraduate Admissions Office
Faculty of Science, Engineering and Computing
Accessible via Switchboard tel. +44 (0)20 8417 9000

Scholarships Department
Tel: +44(0)20 8417 3221
Email:

Development Office
Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 3112
Email:

Development Office
Tel: +44 (0)20 8417 3112
Email:

Note: any further enquiries regarding these training opportunities (not related to funding) should be addressed to Prof. A. Karlyshev

Supervisor profile:

http://sec.kingston.ac.uk/about-SEC/people/academic/view_profile.php?id=80

Selected publications:

1.Karlyshev A. V., et al. (2008) Campylobacter jejuni Capsular Polysaccharide. In: Campylobacter 3rd Edition, Edited by: I. Nachamkin C. M. Szymanski and M. J. Blaser.
2.Karlyshev A. V. and Wren B. W. (2005) Development and application of an insertional system for gene delivery and expression in Campylobacter. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 71:4004-13.
3.Karlyshev A. V., et al. (2005) The Campylobacter glycome. FEMS Reviews, 29:377-390.
4.Karlyshev A. V., et al. (2005) Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni capsular loci reveals multiple mechanisms for the generation of structural diversity and the ability to form complex heptoses. Molecular Microbiology, 55:90-103.
5. Karlyshev, A. V., et al. (2005) The polysaccharide capsule of Campylobacter jejuni. In: Campylobacter: Molecular and Cellular Biology: 249-258 (Horizon Bioscience).
6.Karlyshev A. V., et al. (2004) The Campylobacter jejuni general glycosylation system is important for attachment to human epithelial cells and in the colonization of chicks. Microbiology 150:1957-64.
7.Karlyshev A. V., et al. (2003) Further strategies for signature-tagged mutagenesis and the application of oligonucleotide microarrays for the quantitation of DNA-tagged strains. In: Methods in Microbiology: Functional Microbial Genomics, 33: 167-184 (Elsevier Science).
8.Karlyshev A. V., et al. (2002) Multiple paralogous genes of C. jejuni essential for flagella biosynthesis and phase variation. Microbiology, 148:473-480.
9.Karlyshev A. V., et al. (2001) Application of High-Density Array-Based Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis To Discover Novel Yersinia Virulence-Associated Genes. Infection and Immunity, 69:7810–7819.

Visit the MSc by Research in Molecular Microbiology page on the Kingston University website for more details! https://www.findamasters.com/common/clickCount.aspx?theid=41120&type=25&did=2455&url=http%253a%252f%252fhttp%3a%2f%2fwww.kingston.ac.uk%252fresearch%252fresearch-degrees%252favailable-degrees%252fma-and-msc-by-research%252f

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This programme is offered in partnership with the Institute of International Education in London. Students are given an academically rigorous programme that explores linguistics issues relating to the Japanese language. Read more
This programme is offered in partnership with the Institute of International Education in London. Students are given an academically rigorous programme that explores linguistics issues relating to the Japanese language. It also analyses research in applied linguistics, particularly research activities and themes that impinge on the language learning environment, such as second language acquisition, language testing, communicative language learning and classroom-based research.

The programme also explores the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment, with an emphasis on the teaching of Japanese, and evaluates the role and future of information technology within a resource-based language-learning framework.

The aims of the programme are:

- To explore linguistics issues in the Japanese language

- To analyse the research in applied linguistics, in particular the research activities and themes that impinge on the language learning environment such as second language acquisition, language testing, communicative language learning and classroom-based research

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment with an emphasis on the teaching of Japanese

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology within source-based language learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom teaching) methods of language learning.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lljap

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Japanese Teaching Methodology (15 credits)
Japanese Language & Analysis (15 credits)
Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:

- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students will be assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates may consider a role as a language teacher in schools, colleges or universities.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643759

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. Read more
The programme is organised by the Centre of Language Studies. Within this research institute, language and communication specialists from Radboud University and the University of Tilburg work closely together. You will also be able to follow a number of lectures in Tilburg. Our programme is known to be challenging, but it also offers students a very large degree of choice.

Real language in real-life situations

Whenever we use language we are involved in communicating. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme. It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observation skills to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Challenging research environment

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in topics such as language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language

Why study Language and Communication (Research) at Radboud University?

- The Research Master's program in Language and Communication is a two-year course of study offered jointly by Radboud University Nijmegen and Tilburg University. Both universities combine leading-edge research with excellent education. This program, with its strong emphasis on empirical study, is unique in the Netherlands.
- In this programme, students explore language and communication as an integrated whole. Communication in face-to-face and multi-modal interactions at work is a central theme. Other topics include understanding how the use of language shapes institutional, cross-cultural, and international interaction.
- The current partnership between the Faculties of Arts at Nijmegen and Tilburg intensifies fifteen years of collaboration in the Centre for Language Studies (CLS), which is closely linked to the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Baby Research Centre. Students can profit from these partnerships with state-of-the-art education and individual research opportunities.

General requirements:

- Bachelor's degree
The graduation date of the last attained BA/BSc degree relevant for this programme must be within five years of applying to the programme.

- English skills
The Cognitive Neuroscience Master's programme (MSc CNS) is an English programme: all courses and examinations are taught in English. For the general language requirements of the Radboud University click here. Foreign students please note that the MSc CNS programme requires the following minimum scores: TOEFL: 600 (paper-based test), 250 (computer-based test), 100 (internet-based test); IELTS 7.0 or higher.

- Mathematics & Physics
Students who did not follow physics in their high school curriculum and/or who have not been trained in mathematics at level B (including concepts such as matrix algebra, differentiation, integration, complex numbers), are advised before the start of the programme to work on the assignment in Chapters 1, 2, 7, 8 and 11 (three chapters on physics and two on mathematics) of R.K. Hobbie: "Intermediate Physics for Medicine and Biology", Springer Verlag, New York, 1997; third edition, ISBN 1-56396-458-9).

Career prospects

The primary goal of the programme is academic training, which makes it ideal for those wishing to embark on a research career, for example by taking a PhD. But it also caters for the growing demand from the public and private sectors for people with academic insight and research skills. Many graduates will join research groups in the public and private sector. These may address a wide range of topics such as advanced Internet and enhancing professional communication in an international context.

Our approach to this field

Whenever we use language we are involved in communication with others - to persuade, to inform and to exchange ideas. How does this work and why is there miscommunication? How does language fit together in spoken language and non-verbal cues such as eye-contact or facial expression and how do we learn to understand each other's language? This is the central theme of this unique programme.

It is unique because language and communication are treated as a single unit with each field complementing the other. The programme is also special because it focuses strongly on empirical research. We invite you to discover exciting new areas of research, where language and communication are illuminated by developments in information and communication technology. You will be studying real language in real-life situations and you will use your observations to develop possible theories. Later, you will test these theories against everyday reality. In this way you will discover the richness of both language and communication.

Our research in this field

As a Master’s student in Language and Communication you will find yourself in a challenging research environment. The university has experts in language variation and language diversity, language technology, sign language, intercultural communication, persuasive communication, optimal communication and the ways in which language can be processed. These specialists work closely with colleagues in the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics (MPI) and the Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour (FI BCB). As a result, Nijmegen can provide you with an exceptional opportunity to explore new avenues of knowledge and the chance to work alongside specialists who are leaders in their field internationally.

See the website http://www.ru.nl/masters/language

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The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa is in the first place a rewarding cultural and human experience. It is designed both as an end qualification in itself and as a platform preparing students for more advanced graduate work.

It typically suits students falling into one of the following three categories:

- students planning to pursue further research, which may involve at a subsequent stage the acquisition of a doctoral degree and a career in higher education;

- students willing to pursue a career or professional activity, for which advanced knowledge of the religions of Asia and Africa and of the theoretical and practical issues involved in their study is essential: arts, media, teaching, NGOs and charities, interfaith dialogue, consultancy for governmental agencies or the private sector, religious institutions, museums, and more.

- students who wish to pursue the academic study of religions as a complement to their personal experience and commitments: religious ministers and clerics from all confessions, believers, yoga and meditation practitioners; anyone interested in specific religious traditions or in religion as an essential dimension of life, and in the critical and experiential enhancement that their academic study may offer.

The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language course will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

The MA Religions of Asia and Africa at SOAS is the premier postgraduate curriculum in the U.K. for the study of the religions of Asia and Africa. It covers a wider range of religious traditions than most comparable programmes, whether in the U.K. or abroad: Buddhism in nearly all its doctrinal and regional varieties, Asian and African Christianities, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Shinto, Taoism, Zoroastrianism as well as the local religious cultures of Asia and Africa. It is strongly interdisciplinary and methodologically diverse, offering advanced learning in the theory of religion as well as in historical, anthropological, philosophical, sociological and textual approaches to the study of particular religious traditions.

It provides a unique opportunity to tap cutting-edge academic expertise and library facilities on Asian and African religions as part of a spirited, cosmopolitan student community and within the intense religious and cultural scene of London.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

For the Japanese pathway please see the webpage for the Japanese pathway of the programme and contact the MA convenor of that pathway for further information on the language component. Further information on entry level language requirements can be found on the programme page at: http://www.soas.ac.uk/japankorea/programmes/ma-and-intensive-language-japanese/

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Email:

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/

Structure

Students are generally required to follow taught units to the equivalent of three full courses (which may include one language course), and to submit a dissertation of 10,000 words.

In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and one discipline unit in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two discipline units.

Programme Specification

MA Religions of Asia and Africa and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 300kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/religions-and-philosophies/programmes/ma-religions-of-asia-and-africa-and-intensive-language/file93574.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:

- Advanced knowledge and understanding of selected approaches, methods and theories in the study of religions, with particular reference to the religious traditions of Asia and Africa.

- Advanced skills in researching and writing about topics in religious studies, also as a platform for further research at doctoral level.

- Advanced skills in presentation or communication of knowledge and understanding of topics in religious studies.

- Specialisation in one area from among those covered by the units listed in the programme structure.

- In the two-year pathway, the student will also be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will learn how to assess data and evidence critically, locate and synthesise source materials, critically evaluate conflicting interpretations and sources, use research resources (library catalogues, journal databases, citation indices) and other relevant traditional sources.

- Subject specific skills, such as manuscript transcription, textual bibliography, the editing of texts; familiarity with the study of religions as an academic field of study and its varieties.

- Aspects of literature in the Study of Religions, philosophy, learning, iconography and history, the impact of religion on society.

- Acquisition of language skills.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students should become precise and cautious in their assessment of evidence, and to understand through practice what documents can and cannot tell us.

- Students will develop the capacity to discuss theoretical and epistemological issues in an articulate, informed, and intellectual manner.

- Students will learn to become precise and critical in their assessment of scholarly arguments and to question interpretations, however authoritative, in order to reassess evidence for themselves.

- Students will learn to present complex theoretical arguments clearly and creatively.

- Those students who take a language option should be able to assess primary sources in foreign languages and critically evaluate interpretations proposed by different scholars.

- Students will acquire both theoretical and regional expertise in order to develop and apply self-reflexive approaches to the issues raised by the cross-cultural study of religions.

Subject-based practical skills:
The programme aims to help students with the following practical skills:

- Academic writing.

- IT-based information retrieval and processing.

- Presentational skills.

- Examination techniques.

- Independent study skills and research techniques.

- Reflexive learning.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language

Transferable skills:
The programme will encourage students to:

- Write concisely and with clarity.

- Effectively structure and communicate ideas (oral and written).

- Explore and assess a variety of sources for research purposes.

- Work to deadlines and high academic standards.

- Assess the validity and cogency of arguments.

- Make judgements involving complex factors.

- Develop self-reflexivity.

- Develop an awareness of the ethical complexity of representational practices.

- Question the nature of social and cultural constructs.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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The M.A. Read more

Program Overview

The M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at the American Graduate School in Paris is a two-year program qualifying you for a broad range of careers in international affairs, from local governance to foreign affairs, to international development, human rights advocacy, global communications, international business, and many other areas involving interaction with different countries and cultures.


:A US-accredited Program in France:

The M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS combines the wide recognition of an American degree with the unique experience of a Paris-based program. It is accredited in the US as an affiliated program of Arcadia University (Pennsylvania) and taught at the American Graduate School in Paris, a private nonprofit institution of higher education recognized by the French Ministry of Higher Education.

Classes are taught in the heart of Paris. The French capital – which is also one of Europe’s capitals and an international hub – is an ideal location for the study of international affairs. The program takes full advantage of this through guest speakers, site visits, and networking events. These all represent opportunities to get exposed to the international scene and make connections with the many diplomatic missions, intergovernmental organizations, and NGOs that the city hosts.

The language of instruction is English; no knowledge of French is required to enroll. You have the opportunity to learn French through AGS’s partner institution Alliance Française Paris-Ile de France.


:Expertise in International Affairs:

The program draws on AGS’s specific expertise in the field of international relations, in which the school has specialized since it was founded in 1994. At the core of this expertise, the faculty of the program is comprised of both accomplished scholars conducting research at the forefront of their discipline, and practitioners sharing their knowledge and professional experience, such as retired Ambassadors or government officials.

See AGS faculty - http://www.ags.edu/about-ags/faculty

The curriculum strikes a careful balance between academic thoroughness and practice-oriented approaches to fully prepare you for the professional arena. It examines the interaction between State and non-State actors at an international level through a multi-disciplinary scope covering political as well as cultural, historical, economic, geographical, social, legal, and humanitarian aspects, all updated to include the most current international issues.

Required courses cover the core subjects of international relations theory, economic policy, international public law, foreign policy formulation, and methodology. A broad rage of electives is available to explore other areas of international affairs such as NGO management, environment policy, gender issues, geopolitics, conflict resolution, and area studies.

See course catalog - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/graduate-course-catalog


:A Multicultural Learning Environment:

A unique aspect of the program is the diversity of perspectives infused in the classroom, with students as well as faculty coming from many different national origins. This combined with the American-style interactive teaching methods, makes for an enriching and mind-opening class experience.


:Master’s thesis:

The program culminates in the completion of a Master’s thesis. Through the in-depth research and writing involved in the thesis process you will form a specialization in an area of your interest, as well as strengthen your ability to plan and complete a substantial project.

The thesis topic is elaborated in coordination with the Academic Committee and faculty advisors based on your area of interest and professional objectives.


:Foreign Policy component:

You may choose to include a foreign policy component in your thesis. This exercise will offer you the opportunity to apply the international relation theories and methods learned to construct new solutions to current international problems, thus leading to concrete solutions supported by solid academic research.

Degree Requirements

In order to obtain the degree of Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy, you must meet the following conditions:

- Successful completion of the curriculum (42 credits) with a minimum GPA of 3.0 (See curriculum details - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/curriculum)
- Pre-intermediate level of French language by graduation (1 on the ALTE scale, A2 on the CEF scale French Language Proficiency Level Scale - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/master-in-international-relations/798-french-language-proficiency-level-scale).
- Note : to help you meet this requirement, AGS offers optional French language courses with its partner institution Alliance Française Paris-Ile de France (more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/optional-french-language-courses).
- Research and writing of a 25,000 to 35,000-word thesis complying with the academic standards set forth by the school.

Program options

A range of options allows you to tailor the program around your particular interests and career objectives.


:Internship:

While in the Master’s program, you have the opportunity to perform an internship in a Paris-based organization: diplomatic/consular mission, intergovernmental organization, NGO, multinational corporation news media outlet or another type of relevant international institution.

Internships are optional and can be pursued either for credit (then counting as a an elective course in the curriculum) or not-for-credit. In all cases, you may benefit from AGS’s guidance and support for internship placement. (Note that in all cases, the student is ultimately responsible for finding his/her internship.)


:Area concentrations:

You may specialize in a particular sector of international affairs and obtain, in addition to your M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy, a Certificate of Concentration in your area of specialization. The requirements for this option consist of elective courses in the said area, directed readings, comprehensive exams, and an area-focused thesis.

Area Concentrations Available include:

- African Studies
- Asian Studies
- Middle Eastern Studies


:Dual degree options:

A number of dual program options with partner universities allow you to earn a second degree in a complementary discipline in addition to your US-accredited M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy:

- European accredited Master in Diplomacy and Strategic Negotiation (with Université Paris-Sud, Sceaux, France): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/dual-program-in-international-relations-diplomacy-and-strategic-negotiation

- European accredited LL.M. in French and European Union Law and Business Ethics (with Université de Cergy-Pontoise, France): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/dual-program-in-international-relations-and-international-law

US-accredited M.A. in Peace and Conflict Resolution (with Arcadia University, USA): more information here - http://www.ags.edu/dual-programs/international-relations-and-diplomacy-international-peace-and-conflict-resolution


:International opportunities:

You may spend one of the semesters of the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy program abroad, studying at one of AGS's partner institutions while earning credits toward your AGS degree. Options include the United States (Arcadia University) and Italy (University of Siena). You may also spend the summer at UC Berkeley Extension, completing an additional module in leadership and management.

See more information - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/international-opportunities


:Combined M.A.-Ph.D. program:

AGS offers a combined M.A.-Ph.D. program per the American model. The combined M.A.-Ph.D. program allows you to credit the required courses toward both degrees simultaneously. Ph.D. candidates having successfully completed their M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS would therefore be exempt from taking the required courses, and would only have to take seven elective courses for the Ph.D. program. Note that admission into the Ph.D. program is not automatic after obtaining the M.A.

Timeframe options

Full-time two-year track: the program is designed to be completed in two years on a full-time basis, involving nine to twelve hours of classes per week in addition to readings, assignments, and the research and writing of the thesis.

Accelerated 18-month intensive track: You have the option to complete the program in three semesters instead of four. You would then be required to take twelve to fifteen hours of classes per week.

Part-time track: EU students and other students who do not need to be enrolled on a full-time basis for visa purposes may undertake the program over a longer period of time on a part-time basis. This allows working professionals and other interested candidates to combine the program with other activities.

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This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. Read more
This programme is designed for both graduates with teaching experience and practising language teachers and trainers who wish to build a career in modern languages and English as a foreign language. It enables students to make an effective contribution to language learning in their organisation through research, development and the application of newly acquired knowledge, and enhance career prospects in further and higher education.

Students are introduced to a wide range of research in applied languages, in particular those research activities and themes that affect the language-learning environment, including second language acquisition and communicative language teaching.

Students also explore research in language learning in relation to the practical learning environment. They acquire the skills to write and use computer-aided language learning tools and conduct a research project in language learning and language teaching.

The aims of the programme are:

- To analyse theory and research in applied languages, particularly the research activities and theoretical frameworks that impinge on language learning and language teaching and testing

- To explore the interface between research in language learning and the practical learning environment

- To evaluate the role and future of information technology with a resource-based language-learning framework

- To develop an awareness of non-traditional (i.e. non-classroom-based) methods of language learning

- To provide the research skills and knowledge of research methods in language learning to enable the student to conduct their own project.

Visit the website http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/courses/pg/lang/lang

Language

With special emphasis on building communication skills and developing cultural awareness, our programmes will enable you to become more effective in your chosen career.

What you'll study

Full time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Part time
- Year 1:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Key Issues in Second Language Teaching (30 credits)
Second Language Acquisition (30 credits) (30 credits)

- Year 2:
Students are required to study the following compulsory courses.

Reseach Methods in Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
The Use of Information Communication Technology (ICT) in Second Language Learning (30 credits) (30 credits)
Research Project (MAMLL/LL&JLT)(60 credits) (60 credits)

Fees and finance

Your time at university should be enjoyable and rewarding, and it is important that it is not spoilt by unnecessary financial worries. We recommend that you spend time planning your finances, both before coming to university and while you are here. We can offer advice on living costs and budgeting, as well as on awards, allowances and loans.

Find out more about our fees and the support available to you at our:
- Postgraduate finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/pg)
- International students' finance pages (http://www.gre.ac.uk/finance/international)

Assessment

Students are assessed through essays and a dissertation.

Career options

Graduates can become teachers of languages in schools, colleges or universities, or manage a department of languages.

Careers and employability

FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE, COMPUTING & HUMANITIES
Our programmes develop the essential skills of communication, self-discipline, independent research and teamwork - all qualities increasingly valued by employers in many fields. A wide range of career opportunities are open to our graduates, ranging from education, publishing and advertising to public administration, speech therapy and IT. We ensure there is a good balance between theory and practice in all our programmes, developing academic and intellectual skills in tandem with practical application.

We work with employers to ensure our degrees provide students with the skills and knowledge they need in the world of work.

Students from the majority of our programmes have the opportunity to undertake work placements in business or the wider community, as a part of their degree. These range from full-year placements to practical course options to work experience opportunities. Students receive advice and mentoring from successful professionals, and to plan their futures from an informed and supported position giving them the best chance of success in the world of work.

Staff will work with students to help find suitable opportunities that will develop the students understanding of their subject and help increase their overall skills and experience, as well as develop an insight into a possible future career. We have good relationships with a wide range of employers but are always keen to help students find new placements that reflect their goals and ambitions. Our network of national and international employers supports the three-way relationship between the student, the employer and the faculty.

The university also provides many opportunities for students to gain work experience and enhance career prospects. The Employability and Careers Service (ECS) offers a range of options, including JobShop, mentoring, volunteering and the student ambassador scheme.

Find out about the teaching and learning outcomes here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/?a=643756

Find out how to apply here - http://www2.gre.ac.uk/study/apply

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An American M.A. and a European LL.M. in three years. Read more
An American M.A. and a European LL.M. in three years

Thanks to a partnership between AGS and the Law School of Université de Cergy-Pontoise in France, students enrolled in the Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy program at AGS may choose a dual-degree option whereby they earn two Master's degrees over the course of three years:

- A U.S.-accredited M.A. (Master of Arts) in International Relations and Diplomacy
- A Europe-accredited LL.M. (Master of Laws) in French & European Union Law and Business Ethics

In addition, students in this program earn a Certificate in Anglo-Saxon Law from AGS.
This dual program takes place entirely in France, in the Paris area. All courses are instructed in English; additional French language and culture courses are offered to non-French speakers.

Detailed description of the program

:M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy at AGS:

All information about the Master of Arts in International Relations and Diplomacy program at AGS can be found here - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/master-in-international-relations


:Preparatory courses in Law:

In order to be eligible for the LL.M. program, students who do not have a legal background are required to take four preparatory courses while pursuing their M.A. at AGS:

- Introduction to Common Law
- American Tort Law
- American Contract Law
- American Criminal Law

Students who successfully complete the four preparatory courses earn a Certificate in Anglo-Saxon Law from AGS. Near completion of these preparatory courses and the AGS degree, qualified students may apply to the LL.M. program at Cergy (see below for details).


:LL.M. in French & European Union Law and Business Ethics at Université de Cergy Pontoise (UCP):

The LL.M. program is a one-year full time program. Courses are taught in English. They take place in the greater Paris area, on the campus of Université de Cergy-Pontoise, accessible by public transportation (RER) from the center city.

The LL.M. in French & European Union Law and Business Ethics at Université de Cergy-Pontoise provides specialized knowledge in French, European Union and International Law for students preparing to work for or in relation with Intergovernmental Organizations, NGOs, European institutions, and International Corporations.

The faculty in the LL.M. program is composed of both academics and lawyers or other professionals. In some cases, seminars are taught by and within international law firms based in Paris. Through this setting, the program provides its students with a network of contacts among the international legal community in Paris.

In addition to the optional French language courses offered at AGS along with the M.A., students follow a course in French Language and Culture at UCP along with the LL.M. courses in the last year. This course is specifically designed to allow foreign students to develop their communication skills in French and learn about French culture - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/degree-programs/optional-french-language-courses

More about the LL.M. program - http://www.droitucp.fr/formations/master/m2-recherche/droit-llm.php

The UCP Law School ranks among the top five law schools in France (see SMBG and Juristudiant rankings).
http://www.meilleures-licences.com/licence-droit-anglais/universite-de-cergy-pontoise-faculte-de-droit-licence-en-droit-parcours-droit-anglo-americain.html?PHPSESSID=90fbf46e5db8dfa20aae8b3a7724a9f8
http://www.juristudiant.com/forum/sujet.php?id_sujet=253&PAGE=3

Université de Cergy Pontoise is a leading center of education and research in France and internationally. It is a young dynamic university with an international scope. There is a student body of 20,000, including 3,000 in the law School. The faculty is composed of 1,000 members. UCP offers all levels of undergraduate and post-graduate studies in various disciplines around five major poles: law, languages, literature and social sciences, economy and management, science and technology.

More about Université de Cergy-Pontoise - https://www.u-cergy.fr/en/index.html

Steps of the Dual Program

1. In their first two years, students complete the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy, as well as - for those who do not already have a legal background - four preparatory Law courses at AGS.

Note: although the application process for the LL.M. part of the dual program does not start until the fourth semester, students are strongly encouraged to express their interest in pursuing this dual option as early on as possible so as to schedule the preparatory Law courses as evenly as possible over the four semesters of the International Relations program.

2. In their fourth semester at AGS, students apply to the LL.M. program at UCP.

Thanks to AGS-UCP partnership, students who do not have a legal background are eligible for this program as long as they successfully complete the M.A. in International Relations and Diplomacy as well as the four preparatory courses in Law. However, admission is not automatic; students have to apply directly to UCP (see UCP website.) AGS provides consultation on the application process. - http://www.droitucp.fr/formations/master/m2-recherche/droit-llm.php

3. In their third year, students follow the LL.M. in French & European Union Law and Business Ethics program at Université de Cergy-Pontoise.

More

Tuition - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/admissions/tuition/double-degree-programs

Applying - http://www.ags.edu/international-relations/admissions/applying/double-degree-programs

Note: AGS offers this dual program in partnership with Université de Cergy-Pontoise. AGS is not responsible for the operations and contents of the LL.M. part of this dual program, which remain under the sole responsibility of the partner institution.

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- Intercalating medical students, or students intending to pursue a medical degree. - Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of medical anthropology with reference to Asia or Africa, but also including other parts of the world. Read more

Who is this programme for?:

- Intercalating medical students, or students intending to pursue a medical degree.

- Students with a degree in the social sciences or humanities wishing to acquire a broad understanding of medical anthropology with reference to Asia or Africa, but also including other parts of the world

- People with professional experience in medical practice who have an interest in cross-cultural understandings of health and illness.

- Students with a degree in social anthropology wishing to pursue more specialist topics in the anthropology of medicine.

- Students without a previous degree in Anthropology looking for an MA conversion degree to serve as a qualification for pursuing a further research degree in anthropology

- The two-year intensive language pathway is directed at students who want to engage with a country in a professional as well as academic way, as the intensive language courses will enable them to reach a near proficient knowledge of the language.

As one might expect of study at SOAS, our programme is unique in that we take a cultural and phenomenological approach to the anthropology of medicine. That is, we stress a truly cross-cultural method, one which unites all medical systems in a unified comparative perspective. This allows students to grasp the underlying principles and questions common to all therapeutic systems. Given the diversity of the School’s courses, students may choose options which strengthen either the humanities or the development studies aspects of their interests.

It can also be taken with an intensive language pathway over two years, therefore making this programme unique in Europe.

The Japanese pathway is available for students who have an intermediate level of Japanese. Students will be required to take a placement exam in the week before classes begin in order to determine if their level is suitable. Please contact Professor Drew Gerstle () for further information.

The Korean pathway is designed for beginner learners of Korean. Students with prior knowledge of Korean are advised to contact the programme convenor, Dr Anders Karlsson (). Students will take four course units in the Korean language, one of them at a Korean university during the summer after year 1.

The Arabic pathway is designed for beginner learners of Arabic. Students will take four units of Arabic, one of them at the Qasid Institute in Jordan or another partner institution during the summer after year 1. Programme convenor: Dr Mustafa Shah ()

Visit the website http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-medical-anthropology-and-intensive-language/

Structure

- Core course: Cultural Understandings of Health - 15PANC093 (1.0 unit).

- Dissertation in Anthropology and Sociology - 15PANC999 (1.0 unit). This is a 10,000 word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Programme Convenor of the MA Medical Anthropology and the candidate’s supervisor.

- In addition, all MA Anthropology students 'audit' the course Ethnographic Research Methods during term 1 - this will not count towards your 4 units.

- Students without previous experience of anthropology must take the foundation course, Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology - 15PANC008 (1.0 unit).

Option Courses - Group A and Group B:

Students then choose TWO 0.5 unit courses from the Group A and B lists.

- AT LEAST ONE of the two 0.5 unit courses normally must come from Group A
- Students not taking Theoretical Approaches to Social Anthropology may then select their fourth unit (either a single 1.0 unit course or two 0.5 unit courses) from the Option Courses list.
- Alternatively, one language course may be taken from the Faculty of Languages and Cultures
- In the two-year language pathway, students take 2 intensive language units and Cultural Understandings of Health (1 unit) in their first year. During the summer, they will participate in a summer school abroad (location dependant on language). Upon their return, they will take one intensive language unit in their second year and two optional anthropology units. In the intensive-language pathway, the same rules apply as for the usual MA.

Programme Specification

MA Medical Anthropology and Intensive Language Programme Specification (pdf; 230kb) - http://www.soas.ac.uk/anthropology/programmes/ma-medical-anthropology-and-intensive-language/file93566.pdf

Teaching & Learning

Aims and Outcomes:
- All students are introduced to the types of problem and areas of questioning which are fundamental to the anthropology of medicine.

- Students new to the discipline are given knowledge of the general principles of anthropological enquiry

- All students develop advanced knowledge and understanding of the theoretical approaches which help form an anthropological perspective.

- All students gain an understanding of the practical methods by which this perspective is applied in field research.
All students will be provided with a near proficient ability in a language.

Knowledge:

- Students will be familiar with the foundational literature on the basis of which medical anthropology is linked to and emerges from broader disciplinary concerns.

- Students will have knowledge of the intersections linking medical anthropology to related fields, such as social studies of science, studies in bioethics, and critical approaches to public health

- Students will be familiar with the numerous ethnographic studies of health and illness.

Intellectual (thinking) skills:

- Students will learn to deploy an ethnographic kind of questioning – one directed toward teasing out of complex situations the sets of particular norms or principles which condition or shape them.

- As anthropologists, they will be trained to look for the specifically social in everything (even & especially in the “natural”)

- Students will learn how to form an anthropological problem – that is to distinguish an anthropological problem from a mere topic or area of interest.

Subject-based practical skills:

- Personal drive: Students are expected to take responsibility for their own learning

- Students will develop research skills: including location and adjustment to differing types of library collection, as well as locating organizations and people who hold significant information

- Listening & understanding: Students will be able to assimilate complex arguments quickly on the basis of listening – and to discuss or disagree constructively with points made by others.

- Planning and problem solving: students will be able to set targets and achieve them, and will be able to work well to deadlines.

- Working in a group: students will learn to lead by contributing to the development of consensus.

- In the two year intensive language pathway, to acquire/develop skills in a language to Effective Operational Proficiency level, i.e., being able to communicate in written and spoken medium in a contemporary language.

Transferable skills:

- Students will develop an ability to begin from a general question or issue and develop an appropriate research model and method.
- Ability to clearly represent a concise understanding of a project/problem and its solution.
- An ability to recognize and appreciate for what it is an unconventional approach or an unfamiliar idea
- An ability creatively to resolve conflict while working in a team; being able to see the other person’s point of view
- An ability to work and feel at ease in multicultural or cross cultural environments.

Find out how to apply here - http://www.soas.ac.uk/admissions/pg/howtoapply/

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Modern civil engineering professionals often require an extensive understanding of construction management due to the strategic benefits it can bring to both individuals and project teams. Read more

Overview

Modern civil engineering professionals often require an extensive understanding of construction management due to the strategic benefits it can bring to both individuals and project teams.

As the industry becomes more competitive, organisations and their clients are increasingly demanding the combined time, cost and quality assurances that good project management practice provides. Furthermore, the industry now recognises that there is a need for engineers to gain specialist technical knowledge which compliments their academic and professional background.

These observations form the basis of the MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Civil Engineering and Construction Management (See http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-civil-engineering-and-construction-management/ ); an essential core of construction management material augmented by a broad range of specialist civil engineering options.

Our students and graduates

Our students are recruited mainly from the civil engineering profession and are typically looking to broaden their knowledge base, extend their technical expertise or gain further learning to meet the needs of the professional institutions. Applicants from other backgrounds planning to develop a career in civil engineering and construction management will also be considered. Graduates of this programme are much sought after by employers, working in areas such as transport, water and wastewater engineering and the energy sector.

The Institute for Infrastructure and Environment (IIE)

This programme is delivered by Heriot Watt University’s Institute for Infrastructure and Environment (http://www.sbe.hw.ac.uk/research/institute-infrastructure-environment.htm) . As a Civil Engineering and Construction Management postgraduate student you will be part of the Institute’s Graduate School, connecting you with staff, research associates and fellow students engaging in cutting-edge research in areas such as water management, ultra-speed railways, construction materials, geomechanics and more.

Professional Recognition

This MSc degree is accredited as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for a Chartered Engineer (CEng) for candidates who have already acquired an Accredited CEng (Partial) BEng(Hons) or an Accredited IEng (Full) BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree. See http://www.jbm.org.uk for further information.

Industry links

This programme is supported by our Civil Engineering Industry Advisory Committee, which includes representatives from major multi-national employers AECOM, Arup, Atkins, Balfour Beatty, Halcrow, Jacobs and WSP Group. This committee convenes regularly and advises on the programme content and structure, ensuring quality, up-to-date content and relevance to industry needs.

Teaching and research excellence

Our teaching staff is engaged in a wide range of research within the field of civil engineering and construction management, with at least 90% of our overall research activity in General Engineering confirmed as world-leading or internationally excellent in the UK's Research Excellence Framework (REF) of 2014. Our track record in teaching civil engineering is strong, with our undergraduate programme ranked 1st in Scotland in the 2014 National Student Survey. Over half of our teaching staff are chartered engineers.

With a history dating back to 1821, Heriot-Watt is one of the UK’s leading universities, and Scotland’s most international. Find out more about Heriot-Watt University’s reputation, rankings and international profile http://www.hw.ac.uk/about/reputation/key-facts.htm .

Programme content

The MSc / Postgraduate Diploma in Civil Engineering and Construction Management provides students with a combination of courses designed to improve their knowledge and understanding of advanced civil engineering and modern construction management theory and practice. The programme structure consists of four mandatory construction management courses (CM) which all students must complete. Students must also choose four civil engineering courses (CE) from a list of specialist topics as detailed below. MSc students also complete two research projects.

Course Choice Semester 1
· Project Management: Theory & Practice (CM) - Mandatory
· Value & Risk Management (CM) – Mandatory
· Indeterminate Structures (CE) - Optional
· Sustainability in Civil Engineering (CE) - Optional
· Ground Engineering (CE) - Optional
· Environmental Geotechnics (CE) - Optional

Course Choice Semester 2
· Project Management: Strategic Issues (CM) – Mandatory
· Construction Financial Management (CM) – Mandatory
· Safety, Risk & Reliability (CE) - Optional
· Foundation Engineering (CE) - Optional
· Water and Waste Water Treatment (CE) - Optional
· Urban Drainage Design and Analysis (CE) - Optional
· Earthquake Engineering (CE) - Optional

Find out more about programme content here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-civil-engineering-and-construction-management/

Career opportunities

This programme uses experience from an internally recognised postgraduate qualification, (MSc Construction Management from Heriot-Watt University) and combines it with the high profile Heriot-Watt University Civil Engineering Postgraduate Programme to provide an internationally acclaimed Masters programme.

Recent graduates have been employed by a variety of national and international employers.

English language requirements

If English is not the applicant’s first language a minimum of IELTS 6.5 or equivalent is required with all elements passed at 6.0 or above.

Applicants who have previously successfully completed programmes delivered in the medium of English language may be considered and will be required to provide documentary evidence of this. Examples would be secondary school education or undergraduate degree programme. A minimum of at least one year of full time study (or equivalent) in the medium of English language will be required.

We offer a range of English language courses (See http://www.hw.ac.uk/study/english.htm ) to help you meet the English language requirement prior to starting your masters programme:
- 14 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with no more than one skill at 4.5);
- 10 weeks English (for IELTS of 5.5 with minimum of 5.0 in all skills);
- 6 weeks English (for IELTS 5.5 with minimum of 5.5 in reading & writing and minimum of 5.0 in speaking & listening)

Find information on Fees and Scholarships here http://www.postgraduate.hw.ac.uk/prog/msc-civil-engineering-and-construction-management/

Scholarships available

We have a number of fully funded Scottish Funding Council (SFC) scholarships available for students resident in Scotland applying for Civil Engineering and Construction Management. Find out more about this scholarship and how to apply http://www.hw.ac.uk/student-life/scholarships/postgraduate-funded-places.htm .

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