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Message

Considering dropping out of engineering ms.c


User: Gilverx - 08 July 2017 13:19

Hi all,

So this is just my first semester into the course, 2 months to be exact, and I'm quite unhappy and lost already.

Firstly they advertised their course as modules consisting equal amount of German and English courses. Thinking that I'll be able to do the english modules first for the first semester while brushing up my German language.
But no, since I've registered for SS (Summer Semester), I'll only be able to take courses offered in that semester, which is 4 German modules and one english module.

Adding to the fact that I registered a tad later due to issues with my language certificate, I'm kind of the only guy doing his first semester in a class where everyone else is on their 2nd,3rd,4th semester.
And since the modules are only offered in each particular semester, a typical path would be WS,SS,WS,SS with the last SS being thesis. Now that I've registered for SS, which is the second semester, my path would be reversed. SS,WS,SS,WS, and failing any modules in this or the next semester will result in not enough credits for thesis and thus needing another additional year or so.

Secondly, I've actually no interest in pursing a research or academia career. Initially I plan to graduate here ( germany ) and getting a few years of experience. However, I think that industry would appreciate exp > msc even though I would start off at a lower pay.
Or I would risk being overqualified for some particular jobs as well.

Lastly, I expected a little more real world work/studies in the course. But for all of my modules, they are heavily maths orientated. Without having people to study with and not being able to follow lectures in German.
And looking at job requirements, needing gazillion software proficiency and work experience.

Will finishing a M.sc actually increase my job prospects compared to 3 years exp in the industry?
Or should I quit before I get too deep in?

User: TreeofLife - 11 July 2017 11:23

It's difficult to say what to suggest here. You could quit, but what would you do? And how much money would you lose?

Or can you stop now and rejoin at a different time that makes more sense with the rest of the cohort?

I expect a MSc my give you the edge over other applicants but it's difficult to say.

User: Tudor_Queen - 11 July 2017 12:49

If you think you will fail then you may as well quit. But if you are prepared to battle through and pass then staying sounds the best option - since you don't really have a Plan B at present. Maybe look into other options a bit more? Working and then coming back to do a Masters later is definitely an option. It all just depends on your specific circumstances and what you want.

User: tru - 11 July 2017 13:44

You have very low motivation in continuing with your msc and are very unhappy with the issues in your studies. And you mentioned that you have no interest in a research or academic career. In my opinion, you may wish to consider stopping now and reenrol at a later date.

In addition, if it is industry that you are ultimately aiming for, then job experience matters more than your MSc. You may wish to get a job and work your way up. You can always do a MSc later on. Get you foot in the door first.

User: Gilverx - 13 July 2017 20:03

Thank you for your replies. appreciate it.

Quote From TreeofLife:
It's difficult to say what to suggest here. You could quit, but what would you do? And how much money would you lose?

Or can you stop now and rejoin at a different time that makes more sense with the rest of the cohort?

I expect a MSc my give you the edge over other applicants but it's difficult to say.[/quote]

I won't be losing much as University in Germany doesn't cost that much. Couple of hundreds.
Yes, I will be able to stop now and join the rest of the cohort.
If i were to quit, would probably be going back to my country and get a job there, Mba might be an option after couple years of work.

[quote]Quote From Tudor_Queen:If you think you will fail then you may as well quit. But if you are prepared to battle through and pass then staying sounds the best option - since you don't really have a Plan B at present. Maybe look into other options a bit more? Working and then coming back to do a Masters later is definitely an option. It all just depends on your specific circumstances and what you want.

I will be able to battle through of course, however the question if it's worth the time invested. I've spoken to quite a few intl students. All of them have failed modules and quite abit of them are even on semester 4th, 6th and on their 3rd try of a particular exam and have at least 1 year or 1.5 year ahead, totaling to nearly 4 years plus. Even if it's 3 years, is it worth the time invested, going down a path that I would not be working in, just for a qualification.

User: Gilverx - 13 July 2017 20:08

Quote From tru:
You have very low motivation in continuing with your msc and are very unhappy with the issues in your studies. And you mentioned that you have no interest in a research or academic career. In my opinion, you may wish to consider stopping now and reenrol at a later date.

In addition, if it is industry that you are ultimately aiming for, then job experience matters more than your MSc. You may wish to get a job and work your way up. You can always do a MSc later on. Get you foot in the door first.

I've actually enrolled for the exams already, will probably just try to see how I actually fare before making any decisions.

However, if I do decide to withdraw from the course, will probably try to get an internship / job offer here if possible.

But thank you for the advice. :)




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