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Masters Degrees in English Literature & Creative Writing

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Study a wide range of American fiction, poetry and drama from the second half of the twentieth century. Read more
Study a wide range of American fiction, poetry and drama from the second half of the twentieth century. A particularly innovative aspect of this MA is its focus on cultural difference, as seen, for example, in the option on ‘Ethnic American Literature and Cultural Memory’ which explores the writing of ‘ethnic’ and ‘minority’ groups. Other options are ‘Modern American Novels and Drama: an Introduction’, ‘Postmodern American Fiction’, and ‘The New Poetry and Prose’.

The Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies pathway in American Literature gives students the opportunity to interrogate the major preoccupations and cultural range of American writing. It also offers a firm grounding in the latest developments in literary criticism and analysis, and provides you with the key skills to undertake your own detailed research project successfully. Thus a special feature of the Aberystwyth MA in Literary Studies American Literature pathway is the combination of the study of imaginative writing alongside the development of key transferable skills. As a student on the MA in Literary Studies, pathway in American Literature at Aberystwyth, you will have free access to both the University’s superb library and information technology resources and to the unrivalled collections of the National Library of Wales.

Overview

You will study two core modules together with two optional modules. A specialist module in American literature provides a rigorous and detailed engagement with particular aspects of the literature of America. The course covers a range of research preparation skills including exploiting library resources, using electronic journals and other IT skills, building a bibliography, researching and writing a proposal, structuring a Dissertation, developing and sustaining an argument, footnotes and referencing, and oral presentation skills. The course will also illustrate and interrogate the different kinds of 'textuality', or aspects of the literary text, that need to be taken into account in the study of literature at postgraduate level.

An important part of the course is the writing of a 15,000-word Dissertation in a field of American Literature that is of particular interest to you. Aberystwyth University takes great care in assigning students a supervisor whose interests will be matched as closely as possible to your own.

Application Details

In addition to completing the standard University application package (How to apply), candidates are asked by the Department to supply the following supplementary documents:

1. A letter of application (1 side of A4) that explains why you want to enrol on the Literary Studies (or the particular Literary Studies pathway) MA. It should include a brief account of your academic study to date, touching on relevant literary/critical issues as appropriate – you might mention, for example, the authors to whose work you are particularly drawn, the topics and ideas that are of special significance to you, and the methodologies you have found particularly valuable in your encounter with literary works. The account will be important in helping us to arrive at a decision about your general suitability for the programme.

2. A representative sample of critical work, written during the past three years, of no more than 3000 words. You are allowed to send work submitted as part of a previous degree.

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Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. Read more
Develop your knowledge across a range of fields including urban studies, gender studies, race studies, travel writing, postcolonial writing, autobiographical and epistolary studies. You’ll cover contemporary and recent American fiction and the way ‘real history’ appears in the texts. You are also able to take modules in American history offered by the History Department. If you intend to continue to PhD study, you’ll get essential research training.

Modules

The course explores contemporary American fiction and the way ‘real history’ appears in the texts.
There are modules on urban and postmodern writing, the cold war, race and gender. You can also take classes in American history that will inform your literary studies.

Funding

There are a number of studentships and fee bursaries available, funded by the University. Deadlines for funding applications are usually in winter/early spring. For details, see our website.

Research training for PhD

If you intend to progress to a PhD, your course can be tailored to include essential research training. The same applies to students on the online course.

Part-time study

Part-time students usually take one taught module in each semester. In the second year, you’ll also take a dissertation module. For most courses, you’ll need to come in for one half-day per week. The MA Creative Writing is taught in the evening. Some modules, such as Theatre and Performance, may require greater time commitment. We try to be as flexible as possible to accommodate the different needs of our students.

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This MA in Ancient Narrative Literature focuses on the narratives of the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians, both fictional and factual, in a variety of literary forms, including the novel, epic poetry, mythology, historiography and biography. Read more
This MA in Ancient Narrative Literature focuses on the narratives of the ancient Greeks, Romans and Egyptians, both fictional and factual, in a variety of literary forms, including the novel, epic poetry, mythology, historiography and biography.

The MA in Ancient Narrative Literature introduces students to the key concepts of literary and cultural theory connected with narrative and encourages them to explore new ways of reading ancient texts. As well as some of the classics of ancient literature, the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature also examines some less familiar texts that articulate the stories of sections of the ancient population marginalised by gender and social status.

Modules on the MA in Ancient Narrative Literature typically include:

• Narrative Theory and Genres
• Ancient Greek or Latin language
• Being Greek Under Rome: Greek Literature and Culture in the Imperial Period
• Romance Refracted and Novels Renewed
• Greek and Roman Magic:Exploring the Sources
• Reading Academic German
• Explorers, Travel and Geography
• Saints and Sinners in Christian Late Antiquity

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The School of English at Nottingham has long been at the forefront of research and teaching in the area of applied linguistics. This web-based MA provides an exciting opportunity to work with several leading world figures and to investigate English language in applied contexts. Read more
The School of English at Nottingham has long been at the forefront of research and teaching in the area of applied linguistics.

This web-based MA provides an exciting opportunity to work with several leading world figures and to investigate English language in applied contexts.

You will be introduced to the key ideas and concepts in applied linguistics and provided with thorough training in relevant research methods. This MA is particularly suitable if you wish to pursue a PhD programme after completion of the MA.

The principle of language study that we have established at Nottingham combines theoretical and ideological dimensions with practical applications; we aim to be rigorous and principled while offering an approach to language study that is fundamentally humane.

The MA has intakes in September and February.

Key facts

- The MA courses by web-based distance learning build on the international reputation of the School of English at Nottingham as one of the foremost centres for English Language research in the world.

- We are ranked 7th for English in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015, in the world top 50 for English Literature, Language and Linguistics (QS World University Rankings 2014) and 9th in the UK for 'research power' (REF 2014).

- The course is taught using a course tool software called Moodle. It is also supported by extensive online resources, course materials and teaching.

- The programme offers an excellent route towards pursuing a PhD.

- This MA is convened in the Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics and is among the most popular postgraduate courses of its kind in the UK.

- As well as completing this course at a pace that suits you and your other commitments, you have the flexibility to study towards a Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits), Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) or an MA (180 credits, including dissertation). Please note that if you wish to study for a Postgraduate Certificate or Postgraduate Diploma you still need to apply for the full MA; you would then elect to leave the course with the alternative award (in Modern English Language) once studying.

- The MA Applied Linguistics is also available as an on-site taught full- or part-time course within the University.

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The School of English at Nottingham has long been at the forefront of research and teaching in the area of applied linguistics. This MA provides an exciting opportunity to work with leading world figures in the subject and to investigate English language in applied contexts. Read more
The School of English at Nottingham has long been at the forefront of research and teaching in the area of applied linguistics.

This MA provides an exciting opportunity to work with leading world figures in the subject and to investigate English language in applied contexts.

You will be introduced to the key ideas and concepts in applied linguistics and provided with thorough training in relevant research methods. This MA provides an excellent route into PhD study after completion of the MA.

The principle of language study that we have established at Nottingham combines theoretical and ideological dimensions with practical applications; with a rigorous and principled approach.

The key features of this course include: a theoretical grounding in research methodology and linguistic description, one-to-one tuition with expert members of staff, teaching informed by active leading-edge researchers in the field, innovative and engaging teaching methods, and access to many online resources and flexibility in course content.

Key facts

- This MA is convened in the Centre for Research in Applied Linguistics and is among the most popular postgraduate courses of its kind in the UK
- The School was ranked 7th for English in The Times and Sunday Times Good University Guide 2015
In the world top 50 for English Literature, Language and Linguistics (QS World University Rankings by Subject 2014)
9th in the UK for 'research power' (REF 2014)
- The programme offers an excellent route towards pursuing a PhD
-- Students who wish to apply for an ESRC PhD scholarship can follow the ESRC strand within the programme

The MA in Applied Linguistics is also available as a web-based distance learning course

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The MA/Diploma in Applied Linguistics is a full time programme with modules taught over two semesters (leading to the PG Diploma or Stage 1 of the MA), followed by a supervised dissertation of between 14,000 and 20,000 words between May and September (for Stage 2 of the MA). Read more
The MA/Diploma in Applied Linguistics is a full time programme with modules taught over two semesters (leading to the PG Diploma or Stage 1 of the MA), followed by a supervised dissertation of between 14,000 and 20,000 words between May and September (for Stage 2 of the MA). Assessment of the taught component is by coursework only. The part-time modular programme involves following the same modules over two years and four months.

The modular programme incorporates three broad areas of study: research methodology; language description and comparison; and specialised topics in language and social life, foreign language teaching and multimodality. Students may select from the range of options, as specified below, after consultation with tutors. In certain cases, students may be asked to take a particular module, in the light of their previous academic background and experience and in view of their future careers.
There are three compulsory modules in the MA/Diploma programmes (Research Foundations, Language Description and Phonology) and students select three further modules from the a pool which currently includes those listed below:

• Discourse and Social Interaction
• Forensic Linguistics
• Current Issues in Sociolinguistics
• Lexis
• Qualitative Research Methods
• Multimodality
• Quantitative Research Methods
• Second Language and Pedagogy
• Language, Genre and Ideology
• Text and Social Context

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The MA Applied Linguistics for TESOL programme is for experienced teachers of English as a second or foreign language. The programme offers a broad introduction to many of the key concepts and theories which underpin language teaching. Read more
The MA Applied Linguistics for TESOL programme is for experienced teachers of English as a second or foreign language. The programme offers a broad introduction to many of the key concepts and theories which underpin language teaching. It develops knowledge of language and language study, and also examines theories which might lie behind teaching practices. Applications are welcomed from both home and international students who have a minimum of two years full-time teaching experience.

The MA Applied Linguistics for TESOL draws upon an extensive range of staff expertise and also upon the professional experience which students bring to their studies. The programme can also serve as an introduction to work at PhD level. Throughout the programme, students are encouraged to reflect upon the relationship between theory and practice in their own professional context. The programme will also help students to become aware of the personal, social, and political consequences of their work as an English language teacher in their home country

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This MA builds on the expertise of staff in the School who are leading authorities in Applied Linguistics. Students are introduced to the key ideas in linguistics and trained in research techniques. Read more
This MA builds on the expertise of staff in the School who are leading authorities in Applied Linguistics. Students are introduced to the key ideas in linguistics and trained in research techniques. You then go on to choose from a wide range of optional modules, covering the areas of text and discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, vocabulary and teaching, the study of spoken and written language, as well as related options in world Englishes, literary linguistics, language and culture. You complete the course with a supervised dissertation. Entry dates: September and February.

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This programme supports original research projects across different disciplines, media, or practice-based research, encouraging new ways of thinking on how to historicise, bridge and transcend disciplines. Read more
This programme supports original research projects across different disciplines, media, or practice-based research, encouraging new ways of thinking on how to historicise, bridge and transcend disciplines. Working under the supervision of 2 scholars from different departments in the School of Arts, you will join a unique and innovative interdisciplinary graduate community working in literatures, languages, media and art historical studies, where new kinds of scholarship take their place in a larger academic conversation about cross-cultural transfer, cultural comparison and interdisciplinary interpretation. Current supervisors on this programme include Silke Arnold-de-Simine, Andrew Asibong, Luisa Calè, Ben Cranfield, Patrizia Di Bello, Professor Esther Leslie, Ana Parejo Vadillo, Leslie Topp and Jo Winning. Further potential supervisors can be found via each department's pages.

This programme supports PhDs in comparative studies (e.g. French and English literatures, Japanese and American film), multidisciplinary studies (e.g. English film and literature; photography and book history), theoretical approaches that cut across disciplines (e.g. cultural studies) and practice-based research. If your thesis involves studio-based, audio-visual or technological research, it may include a portfolio, exhibition or other audio-visual display. This must be original work, exemplifying and locating the ideas that are developed in conjunction with the written part of the thesis. In addition to supervision, we support students’ work through a programme of critical theory seminars, and research skills and methodologies classes.

In your first year you are encouraged to think about how to frame research questions, what happens when research subverts disciplinary boundaries, and how these might be seen differently through alternative or historical divisions of knowledge. From the second year, you will take part in research-in-progress workshops and a range of other activities, including conferences, student-led seminars and reading groups. Throughout, your work will be enhanced by and contribute to the School’s vibrant research culture and research centres.

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Summary Description. The MA course in Arthurian Literature is an exciting, long-standing, and successful academic course that benefits from the expertise of world-class academics, outstanding library resources, and a unique location with medieval roots in the legend. Read more
Summary Description

The MA course in Arthurian Literature is an exciting, long-standing, and successful academic course that benefits from the expertise of world-class academics, outstanding library resources, and a unique location with medieval roots in the legend. A good first degree in English or relevant area is required. Research skills taught during the first semester will enable students to engage with a variety of interdisciplinary approaches and sources, ranging from theoretical, historical and cultural aspects of the Arthurian myth.
Background

Arthurian Literature is an established area of expertise in the School of English at Bangor University and has been taught here for over three decades. A long-standing record of teaching, research and publication attests to its vitality; the main specialists in the field are Dr Raluca Radulescu, whose work has focused on Malory, Arthurian romances and chronicles, especially through a cultural approach, and Professor PJC Field, currently President of the International Arthurian Society, and world-renowned for his work on the Arthurian legend through the centuries. However the course also draws upon the expertise available in other periods of literature within the School of English and other schools in the College of Arts and Humanities, ranging from post-medieval approaches in the School of English, or medieval Welsh, History and Archaeology, and Music. Staff in these areas contribute regularly to the teaching of Arthurian topics ranging from the medieval period to the present, including music and modern film adaptations.
Why Bangor for Arthurian Studies?

The attractiveness of the MA in Arthurian Literature at Bangor lies in its flexible, though comprehensive, approach to the study of this area. Students may choose to specialise in either the medieval or the post-medieval period but they will be required to take both modules with these titles in order to benefit from the wide coverage of the Arthurian legend they provide. At the same time they can enjoy all the benefits of one-to-one supervision in the Open Essay options, while also developing their research skills in the Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research Module (shared with the MA in English). Moreover, in-depth introductions to the study of medieval palaeography and codicology are available by collaboration with other relevant schools and disciplines, as a preparation to PhD level (see collaborative doctoral training scheme in palaeography and codicology organised by Dr Raluca Radulescu).
Structure

The MA in Arthurian Literature course consists of two parts. Part One may be organised as a combination of the core Introduction to Literary Theory, Scholarship and Research Module with one Open Essay, and the modules titled Medieval Arthur and Post-Medieval Arthur. Subject to availability, students may choose relevant modules in medieval Welsh literature/Welsh Arthurian literature offered in the School of Welsh.

Part One must be successfully completed before proceeding to the second part, the dissertation. In certain circumstances, you may be eligible for a Diploma or Certificate if you are unable to proceed to part two. The dissertation is a substantial piece of scholarly research, on a subject of your own choice, chosen and discussed in detail with a chosen supervisor.
Other Related Activities

Students who have completed, or are in the course of studying for an MA, usually participate in the activities of the Centre for Medieval Studies, including the medieval research seminar (where they are invited to present their research) and the annual international postgraduate conference, ‘Medievalism Transformed’, now in its fourth year.
Careers

Current and past research students have engaged in higher degrees, teaching, research and librarianship in higher education (UK, US, Japan, and elsewhere), publishing, and a range of related activities. Kevin Whetter is now Associate Professor at Acadia University, Canada, and has co-edited Re-Viewing Le Morte Darthur (Cambridge: DS Brewer, 2005); Dr Takako Kato is Research Associate at the Centre for Textual Scholarship, De Montfort University, and her study Caxton's 'Morte Darthur': The Printing Process and the Authenticity of the Text, was published at Oxford in the Medium Aevum monograph series, in 2002; Professor Yuri Fuwa teaches at Keio University, Japan; Dr Michael Cichon is Professor at the University of Saskatchewan, Dr John Joseph Doherty works in a US university library, and Dr Mark Adderley is Professor of English at Missouri Valley College.

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This new and unique Masters importantly addresses black writing as a continuum. Its heritage in British culture is considered along a trajectory marked by historical presences as connecting with migratory, indigenous and global perspectives. Read more
This new and unique Masters importantly addresses black writing as a continuum. Its heritage in British culture is considered along a trajectory marked by historical presences as connecting with migratory, indigenous and global perspectives.

The MA is:

World first. Nowhere else in the world can you study this field in such a richly, referenced way - in the actual country where the writing is produced.

Cross-disciplinary in teaching, studies, research. Writing as perceived in its broadest form on and off the page and screen.

Collaborative. It will be taught by Professor Joan Anim-Addo and Dr Deirdre Osborne, who share its vision and will co-teach the modules.

Inclusive. We welcome applications from a broad spectrum of people – those seeking academic careers, professionals who are returning to learning, artists who wish to develop their analytic and critical thinking skills.

Connected to local, national and international research streams. Both tutors have well-established research profiles with publications, and track records in convening public events in the field.

What you study

The MA draws upon the expertise of literary, drama and theatre specialists from the Departments of Theatre and Performance and the Centre for Caribbean Studies. The degree is made up of: (I) two compulsory core modules, (II) two options, which you're expected to choose, and (III) a dissertation.

Full-time students study both compulsory modules and two options and write their dissertation across one year of study.

Part-time students select one compulsory module and one option per year across two years and write their dissertation in their second year of study.

Careers

The MA’s design allows for a diverse range of applications of its contents to careers including education, counselling, community arts, arts practice, social services, cultural organisations, or towards research degrees (MPhil; PhD).

Our courses consolidate the influential presence of contemporary Black British writing. It is recognised as both intrinsic to conceptions of British cultural heritage but also distinctive within the body of British writing.

Skills

You will develop transferable writing and oral skills at a high academic level, demonstrating the ability to think and work in an interdisciplinary manner using a range of methodologies. Your ability to work collaboratively and to facilitate and participate in group discussions will be enhanced. You will also develop skills in identifying the socio-cultural, historical, political and literary issues that shape and impact upon contemporary literary and performance texts.

We are oriented towards serving your individual goals and aspirations for self-development; it will generate an articulable body of transferable knowledge and skills.

Besides developing your knowledge of best current research methods and of facts and concepts specific to the featured field of study, the proposed programme will offer training in: discerning vital literary and dramatic roots; recognising how the dynamics of creative

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Children's literature is recognised as a remarkable and dynamic part of literary and social culture. This course, the first full-time one year taught Masters programme in an Irish university, offers graduates in English or related disciplines the opportunity to study a broad range of children's literature in English. Read more
Children's literature is recognised as a remarkable and dynamic part of literary and social culture. This course, the first full-time one year taught Masters programme in an Irish university, offers graduates in English or related disciplines the opportunity to study a broad range of children's literature in English. It addresses chronologies, genres, modes of criticism, publishing trends and the full apparatus of literary investigation across four centuries, while addressing the unique power dynamics that arise from adult authors writing for child readers. It is particularly concerned with multidisciplinary study because of the unique integration of words and images through the medium of picture books and graphic novels, and because its readership is more likely than any other to be 'technological natives' to have grown up taking multimedia approaches to texts for granted. Complete in itself, the course may also serve as preparation for those intending to proceed to further research in the field. Unique opportunities exist to work with the Pollard Collection, the bequest of more than 10,000 children's books left to the College by Mary 'Paul' Pollard, one time keeper of Early Printed Books, in 2005.

Course Content:

There are three elements:

i) Perspectives and case studies in children's literature (core module),

ii) Optional modules:
The child and Victorian literature,
Tolkien: books for children and children's literature,
Historical novels,
Young Adult fiction,
'Be Merry and Wise': the rise of children's literature.

Students choose one optional module in Michaelmas term and a second in Hilary term. Some of the options are shared with the MPhil in Popular Literature.

iii) Dissertation

Assessment is through four 5,000-7,000 word essays and a 15,000 word dissertation.

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The University of British Columbia offers a Master of Arts in Children’s Literature (MACL) program, jointly offered by the Departments of English and Language and Literacy Education, the Creative Writing Program, and the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies. Read more
The University of British Columbia offers a Master of Arts in Children’s Literature (MACL) program, jointly offered by the Departments of English and Language and Literacy Education, the Creative Writing Program, and the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies. The Program Chair and administrative support of the MACL program are housed at the School of Library, Archival & Information Studies.

MACL Overview

The MACL program provides specialized education for graduate students in the study of children’s and young adult literature and media using a multi-disciplinary approach. It provides each student with the opportunity to study the creative writing and publishing of this literature, to examine models of sharing its rich heritage with the young, and also to facilitate the literary, social, historic, and psychological analyses of children’s literature as literature. This multi-disciplinary approach exposes students to many schools of literary criticism, educational theory, and professional and creative practice. It acquaints students with the broad literary canon of children’s literature across a spectrum of languages and cultures, and with a variety of critical perspectives and professional application. Across various disciplines, departments, and faculties, a broad range of courses provide disciplined, academic study of children’s and young adult literature and media.

The MACL Program is the only one of its kind in the world offered from such a broad, multidisciplinary perspective and the only Master’s program in children’s literature in Canada. The program is unique in that the two faculties and the four academic units jointly provide faculty, courses, thesis supervision and committee support to give the graduate academic study of children’s literature a perspective on the full life cycle of the literature – the creation of the literature (through Creative Writing), its critical analysis (through English) and pedagogical approaches to the literature in interaction with children in schools, homes and libraries (Language and Literacy Education; School of Library, Archival & Information Studies).

Faculty in these departments are authors of both acclaimed children’s books and scholarly guides to the literature. They serve on national and international children’s book juries, lead national research studies, and have received awards for scholarship, service, and teaching.

The University Library's collections in historical and contemporary children’s books and the critical study of children’s literature are considered among the strongest such collections in an academic library in Canada, including some 4,000 early and rare children’s books and some 50,000 modern children’s books. As well, the Library maintains a large collection of research materials on children’s literature, including histories, criticisms, bibliographies, catalogues, and biographies.

Students in the MACL Program have come from China, England, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the United States, and from across Canada. The program provides specialized study of children’s books to those who are, or who intend to be, involved in teaching, school and public library services, writing, editing/publishing, theatre/film, storytelling, or affiliated fields.

The Master of Arts in Children’s Literature Program extends beyond its four departments and two faculties in a strong outreach to the community across and outside the University. Members of all departments involved in the program sit on the Steering Committee of the Vancouver Children’s Literature Roundtable which plans a series of annual events and conferences to bring award-winning authors, illustrators, editors and publishers such as Philip Pullman, Gregory Maguire, Shaun Tan, Katherine Paterson, and Lois Lowry to speak with students and Vancouver’s dynamic children’s literature community.

Quick Facts

- Degree: Master of Arts
- Specialization: Children's Literature
- Subject: Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
- Mode of delivery: On campus
- Program components: Coursework + Thesis required
- Faculty: Faculty of Arts
- School: School of Library, Archival and Information Studies

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This new MA offers students the opportunity to study in both the Department of Educational Studies and the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Goldsmiths. Read more
This new MA offers students the opportunity to study in both the Department of Educational Studies and the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Goldsmiths.

It's designed for those who have an interest in the academic study of children’s literature and/or work in education such as teachers or librarians, those in publishing and children’s media and authors and artists who want to create texts for children.

What you study

You will deepen your familiarity with the range and diversity of genres for children from ‘classic’ works to contemporary texts and develop detailed knowledge and critical understanding of issues and debates in the field. Studying children’s literature at Goldsmiths will also involve examining how texts for children reflect contested constructions of childhood.

If you choose to, you can select modules that will support creative writing practices and enable you to work with practising and published creative writing lecturers and education lecturers to study and explore the nature of writing for children.

Goldsmiths MA in Children’s Literature is unique in its focus on inclusive practices and social justice. We will question the sociopolitical contexts in which texts are produced and interpreted and you will be encouraged to explore how texts for children can challenge or reinforce dominant ideological constructions. We interrogate the power relations that determine what is published, distributed and selected to be read by children in schools.

You will explore the relationship between reader, writer, text and context, and consider the processes that underpin those interactions. We will also examine the inherent paradox that studying children’s literature will involve adults writing, selecting and responding to texts that are normally intended for children.

Assessment

Coursework, essays, project, dissertation, creative writing (optional).

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This MA offers students the opportunity to study in both the Department of Educational Studies and the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Goldsmiths. Read more
This MA offers students the opportunity to study in both the Department of Educational Studies and the Department of English and Comparative Literature at Goldsmiths.

It's designed for those who have an interest in the academic study of children’s literature and/or work in education such as teachers or librarians, those in publishing and children’s media and authors and artists who want to create texts for children.

What you study

You will deepen your familiarity with the range and diversity of genres for children from ‘classic’ works to contemporary texts and develop detailed knowledge and critical understanding of issues and debates in the field. Studying children’s literature at Goldsmiths will also involve examining how texts for children reflect contested constructions of childhood.

If you choose to, you can select modules that will support creative writing practices and enable you to work with practising and published creative writing lecturers and education lecturers to study and explore the nature of writing for children.

Goldsmiths MA in Children’s Literature is unique in its focus on inclusive practices and social justice. We will question the sociopolitical contexts in which texts are produced and interpreted and you will be encouraged to explore how texts for children can challenge or reinforce dominant ideological constructions. We interrogate the power relations that determine what is published, distributed and selected to be read by children in schools.

You will explore the relationship between reader, writer, text and context, and consider the processes that underpin those interactions. We will also examine the inherent paradox that studying children’s literature will involve adults writing, selecting and responding to texts that are normally intended for children.

Assessment

Coursework, essays, project, dissertation, creative writing (optional).

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